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MILLETT

OF BOSAVERN AND MARAZION

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES

Tony Millett

tony.millett@xtra.co.nz

2010

2

CONTENTS

Introduction 4

1. John Mylet (living 1435) 5

2. Henry Myllet (d. 1499/1500) 5

3. William Millett (or Militon) (about 1515-1570/71) 7

4. Peter Millett (d. 1615) 10

5. Emmanuel Millett 10

6. Leonard Millett (d. 1686) 11

7. James Millett (1647-1732) 12

8. Robert Millett (1665-1707) 13

9. William Millett (1690-1753) 13

10. James Millett (1692-1743) 14

11. Leonard Millett (1692-1740) 14

12. Robert Millett (1694/95-1731/32) 18

13. Ellianor Millett 19

14. Ann Millett (b. 1702) 19

15. Humphry Millett (d. 1704) 23

16. Grace Millett (1708-1757) 23

17. Humphry Millett (1723-1757) 27

18. Ann Millett (née Sandys) (1724-1806) 27

19. James Millett (b. about 1729) 28

20. Humphry Millett (1744/45-1774) 28

21. John Millett (1748/49-1815) 36

22. Richard Oke Millett (1749-1832) 37

23. Grace Millett (1750-1826) 37

24. Leonard Millett (1755-1841) 38

25. George Millett (1756-1816) 39

26. Martin Millett (b. about 1756) 41

27. William Millett (1759-1791) 41

28. John Curnow Millett (1771-1848) 42

29. Grace Millett (1772-1868) 43

30. Hannibal Curnow Millett (1776-1865) 43

31. Leonard Millett (1778-1798) 44

32. Robert Millett (1788-1844) 45

33. William Millett (1789-1841) 45

34. George Thomas Millett (1790-1824) 46

35. Richard Millett (1791-1828) 47

36. Charles Millett (1792-1873) 48

37. George Millett (1793-1850) 49

38. John Boulderson Millett (1795-1871) 49

39. Frederic Millett (1798-1856) 51

40. Edward Millett (1801-1821) 53

41. Louisa Millett (1801-1871) 53

42. Ann Emily Millett (née Michell) (1804-1886) 54

43. Matilda Millett (1805-1855) 54

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44. John Nicholas Richards Millett (1807-1885) 55

45. Richard Millett (1807-1865) 57

46. Honey Millett (1809-1847) 58

47. Nicholas Richards Broad Millett (1809-1859) 59

48. Leonard Millett (1811-1860) 60

49. Richard Oke Millett (1815-1897) 61

50. Hannibal Curnow Millett (1818-1881) 63

51. Humphry Davy Millett (1818-1867) 65

52. Caroline Millett (1820-1821) 66

53. Cecelia Millett (née Panormo) (b. 1823) 66

54. Leonard Millett (1823-1881) 67

55. Janet Millett (née Webster) 68

56. John George Mudge Millett (1825-1865) 68

57. Richard Oke Millett (1827-1897) 70

58. John Curnow Millett (1828-1870) 71

59. Arthur Hill Millett (1831-1879) 71

60. Fortescue William Millett (1833-1915) 75

61. Hugh Ley Millett (1833-1879) 78

62. Philip Richards Millett (1834-1871) 80

63. James Halse Millett (1835-1890) 80

64. Edwin Ley Millett (1836-1902) 82

65. Sydney Crohan Millett (1836-1879) 83

66. John Nicholas Millett (1837-1918) 85

67. Charles Frederic Millett (b. 1838) 86

68. Montague Millett (1839-1901) 87

69. Cecil George Millett (1840-1865) 88

70. Richard Tracey Millett (1840-1875) 89

71. Robert Edward Michell Millett (1840-1907) 90

72. William Halse Millett (1840-1877) 91

73. Arthur Fenning Millett (1841-1885) 96

74. Edward Waugh Millett (1842-1886) 97

75. George Bown Millett (1842-1896) 100

76. Claude Henry Millett (1846-1924) 103

77. Henry Halse Millett (1846-1877) 104

78. Kate Millett (née Leslie) (1851-1921) 105

79. Towers Trevorian Millett (1852-1882) 106

80. George Prideaux Millett (1863-1950) 110

81. John Lester Vivian Millett (1865-1943) 111

82. Ethel Maude Millett (1867-1920) 112

83. Henry Stansbury Millett (1867-1947) 116

84. Edwin Richard Collingwood Millett (1874-1949) 116

85. Hugh William Millett (1875-1967) 117

86. Maurice Palmer Millett (b. 1877) 117

87. Martin Leslie Millett (1878-1951) 118

88. George Nicholls Millett (1880-1962) 125

89. Isabella Robertson Millett (née Fletcher) (1881-1965) 132

90. Leopold Arthur Millett (b. 1882) 133

91. Nigel Stansbury Girtin Millett (1904-1946) 133

92. Mervyn Richard Oke Millett (1910-1988) 136

93. Margaret Vivian Millett (b. 1914) 137

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94. Millett Family 138

95. Milletts of Bosavern 140

96. Bosavern 141

97. Milletts in Marazion 143

98. Ennys 144

99. Gurlyn 145

100. Penpol House and Estate 146

Bibliography of Sources 148

Subject Index 156

INTRODUCTION

As a genealogist I am, of course, vitally interested in “hatched, matched and dispatched”

information. But as a family historian (albeit an amateur one) I am far more interested in the

lives of my forebears – who they were, what they did, and where they did it. I have therefore

spent considerable time researching my ancestors, in libraries, via the Internet, using

newspapers, books, journals and websites etc. All that I have found out has been entered into

my two family trees, Millett of Bosavern and Millett of Marazion, both in my own Family

Tree Maker files but also, more publicly, on Ancestry.com. However, this information is not

easily findable, as it usually requires knowledge of the name of the person to whom the

information or “story” has been attached.

This publication is intended to assist in making the information I have discovered more easily

accessible. The “stories” are still recorded under the names of the persons to whom they

relate, but a broad subject index has been provided to assist retrieval. The entries are

arranged chronologically by birth date.

All information is sourced, and a bibliography of the sources quoted is provided.

The Milletts included in this publications are, of course, only a tiny proportion of those listed

in my two family trees, being restricted to those about whom I have been able to discover

some interesting fact or account beyond birth, baptism, marriage, occupation, death and

burial data. The list will be added to as further information is found.

Tony Millett

10 O’Neills Avenue

Takapuna, Auckland

New Zealand 0622

Email: tony.millett@xtra.co.nz

Website: http://tonymillett.tripod.com

April 2010

5

1. JOHN MYLET (living 1435)

John Millett came to England in 1419 as ambassador and was a privy councillor in 1435.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 581.

John Mylet came to England in 1432 as an ambassador from John of Lancaster, First Duke of

Bedford (1389-1435), son of King Henry IV and Regent of France for his nephew King

Henry VI, who was technically also heir to the throne of France. It was agreed that 40 marks

should be paid to the ambassador from the Duke of Bedford. See Proceedings and

Ordinances of the Privy Council of England.

Sources:

Millett, George Bown. Genealogical Memoranda as to the Millett Family. Penzance,

March 1870 (manuscript), p. 1.

Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Lancaster,_1st_Duke_of_Bedford.

The first publicly recorded instance of the [Millett] name in England is that of John Mylet,

who came in 1432 as an ambassador from the regent of France, the Duke of Bedford, eldest

uncle of Henry Sixth. It is thought that he never returned to his native country.

Source: Stinchfield, John Clark. History of the town of Leeds, Androscoggin County,

Maine, from its settlement, June 10, 1780. Lewiston, Me, Press of Lewiston Journal,

1901, p. 42.

2. HENRY MYLLET (d. 1499/1500)

Henry Myllet was the son of John Mylet (living 1435). Henry lived at Perivale or Greenford

Parva, Middlesex. He married first Alice ?, and second Joanna ?. Henry died on 5

February 1499/1500 at Perivale, and was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church, Perivale.

Children

Henry Myllet had 3 sons and 6 daughters by his first wife Alice, and 3 sons and 3 daughters

by his second wife Johanna.

Source: Millett, George Bown. Genealogical Memoranda as to the Millett Family.

Penzance, March 1870 (manuscript), p. 1.

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Death

Henry Myllet, probably son of John Millett, died 1505 [i.e. 1500] and was buried Perivale,

Middlesex, leaving issue by 2 wives 15 children.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 581.

Memorial brasses

Some of the monuments in the church [at Perivale] have already been referred to, the most

ancient of these being the brasses to the memory of Henry Mylett, his two wives and fifteen

children; it bears the date a.d. 1500. There are in all five small brasses in good preservation.

The centre one is the figure of Mylett, with that of his wife, Alice, on one side and Joan on

the other; beneath which are the presentments, on separate brasses, of the three sons and six

daughters of the former, and the three sons and three daughters of the latter. The engraved

detail of all the figures is well preserved, and the costumes of the period (Henry VII.) are so

well shown as to render the monument of great interest. A brass plate is inserted between the

two groups of figures, which contains the following partly obliterated inscription : —

“Orate pro anibus Henrici Mylett ac Alicise et Johannse Uxor sua ; qui quidem Henricus obiit

V die Februar. Anno dom millia VO. quorum anibas [(?)] p.pioietur Deus — ame.”

The brasses are on the floor near the altar railing.

Source: Brown, John Allen. The chronicles of Greenford Parva; or, Perivale, past

and present. With divers historical, archæological, and other notes, traditions, etc.,

7

relating to the church and manor, and the Brent Valley. London, J. S. Virtue, 1890,

p. 78.

Descendants

Henry Millett was several times constable of Perivale (Greenford Parva). ... From Henry

Millett descended the family of Millett of Perivale, who seem to have come to an end with

Elizabeth Millett, of Perivale, who died 20 April, 1655, at Agmondisham, Bucks. She

married first Sir Thomas Knightley, and secondly John Lane, of the Inner Temple; and her

monument at Perivale shows the Millett arms: argent, a fess gules between three dragons

heads erased vert.

Now these very same arms had been granted in 1616 to John Millett, of Hayes Court, the

elder brother of Richard Millett, of Denham, Bucks., who died in 1638. So it seems probable

that the Millett of Hayes were a branch of the Perivale family, and descended from one of the

sons of Henry Millett, who died in 1500. One of these sons was probably John Millett, Clerk

of the King's Signet (see The Armorial, iii (1962) p. 160).

Source: Evans, Charles. Millett, of Hayes, Middlesex. Notes and Queries v. 208,

November 1963, p. 403.

3. WILLIAM MILLETT (or MILITON) (about 1515-1570/71)

Family tradition, and several sources, suggest that William Millett was Sheriff of Cornwall in

1566. However, a number of lists of sheriffs of Cornwall state that William Militon was

High Sheriff in 1566.

William Militon (the surname is also spelt Meliton, Melton, Milaton, Mileton, Millaton,

Milleton, Milliton, Milynton, Millyton and Myllyton) was the son of John (or Job) Myliton (or

Myllyton) (1483-1549) and Alice (or Avice) Dennis (or Dennys) (about 1493- 1551). William

was born about 1515 in Breage, Cornwall. He resided at Pengersick Castle, Breage. He

married Honor Godolphin (about 1518-1579) in 1535; they had 9 children – 8 girls and 1

boy. William was Captain of St Michael’s Mount, and High Sheriff of Cornwall in 1566. He

died on 18 March 1570/71 at Breage aged 56, and was buried there on 20 March 1570/71.

William’s only son, William, was born about 1554. He died, unmarried, at sea on 31 May

1571 aged 17, and was buried on 1 June 1571 at Hartland, Devon. His father William,

therefore, was without male issue.

Sheriff of Cornwall

William Millett, Sheriff of Cornwall, eighth year of the Reign of Elizabeth, 1566.

Source: Millett, George Bown. Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished), p. 100.

8

William Millett was sheriff of Cornwall in 1566.

Source: Stinchfield, John Clark. History of the town of Leeds, Androscoggin County,

Maine, from its settlement, June 10, 1780. Lewiston, Me, Press of Lewiston Journal,

1901, p. 42.

One William Millett was Sheriff of the county in the reign of Elizabeth

Source: Gay, Susan Elizabeth. Old Falmouth: the story of the town from the days of

the Killigrews to the earliest part of the 19th century. London, Headley Bros, 1903,

p. 197.

It is said that a William Millett of Marazion was High Sheriff of Cornwall in 1566. He is

shown on Richard Oke Millett's family tree of 1888 with a date of 1558.

Source: Millett Roots: Cornwall. http://roots.milletts.net/cornwall.htm.

William Millett of Marazion was High Sheriff of Cornwall in 1566.

Source: Millett, Iain. Millett of Penpol and Marazion.

http://www.iain.millett.btinternet.co.uk/millett_Story.htm.

William Militon, High Sheriff of Cornwall 1566.

Source: High Sheriffs of Cornwall 1139-1899.

http://cornwallinscriptions.co.uk/html/high_sheriffs.html.

Millaton Family

Near Germoe, but nearer the sea, is the very fine remnant of a castle, Pengersick. It was

erected in the reign of Henry VIII by a certain man of the name of Millaton, probably of

Millaton in Bridestowe, Devon. He had committed a murder, and to escape justice he fled his

native county and concealed himself in the dip of the land facing the sea at Pengersick, where

he constructed a tower amply provided with means of defence. The basement is furnished

with loopholes for firing upon anyone approaching, and above the door is a shoot for melted

lead. The whole building is beautifully constructed.

Here Millaton remained in concealment till he died, never leaving his tower for more than a

brief stroll. The land had not been purchased in his own name, but in that of his son Job,

who, after his death, was made Governor of S. Michael’s Mount. Job had a son, William,

who was made Sheriff of Cornwall in 1565, and he married Honor, daughter of Sir William

Godolphin of Godolphin.

According to a local legend, William Millaton and his wife Honor lived a cat-and-dog life.

They hated each other with a deadly hate, and at length each severally resolved that this

incompatible union must come to an end.

William Millaton said to his wife, “Honor, we have lived in wretchedness too long. Let us

resolve on a reconciliation, forget the past, and begin a new life”.

9

“Most certainly do I agree thereto”, said she.

“And”, continued William, “as a pledge of our reunion, let us have a feast together to-night”.

So a banquet was spread in Pengersick Castle for them twain and none others.

And when they had well eaten, then William Millaton said, “Let us drink to our reunion”.

“I will drink if you will drink”, said she.

Then he drained his glass, and after that, she drained hers.

With a bitter laugh she said, “William, you have but three minutes to live. Your cup was

poisoned”.

“And you”, retorted he, “have but five, for yours is poisoned”.

“It is well,” said Honor; “I am content. I shall have two minutes in which to triumph over

your dead carcass, and to spurn it with my foot”.

On the death of this William, the estate passed to his six sisters, who married into the families

of Erisy, Lanyon, Trefusis, Arundell, Bonython, and Abbot of Hartland.

Source: Baring-Gould, Sabine. A Book of Cornwall. New edition. London,

Methuen, 1906, p. 289-291.

Pengersick Castle

The alliance between the Millitons and the Godolphins was cemented by the marriage of

William's daughter, Honor, to John's son and heir. Much refurbishment of Pengersick

appears to have taken place in celebration of the event, including elaborate decoration of the

panelling in the tower's main room, illustrating the two houses thus united. A copy was made

by Dr Borlase when he visited what remained of the castle in 1738. His original drawing still

hangs in the Marrab Library in Penzance. Unfortunately he didn't bother to copy the portraits

of William and Honor which were said to have hung above the fireplace.

John died in 1549 but his family continued to prosper. William succeeded his father as

Captain of the Mount. The Muster Roll for 1569 indicates that he must have taken

precedence over Francis Godolphin from the list of contributions which the size of his

property caused him to furnish:

“One gelding with his furniture for a light horseman, corslet, pike, haquebut, morion,

long bow and sheaf of arrows”.

However, material success did not lead to long term security. The only son of William and

Honor was lost at sea in 1571. His father died almost immediately afterwards. The property

was divided between the six surviving daughters and with none of them having sufficient of

the property to preserve it as a home, it fell into disuse and was dissipated amongst their

successors, finally reverting to the Godolphins.

10

Source: Evans, Angela. Pengersick Castle: a brief history. Praa Sands, Out of

Town Design and Print, 1998. Cited in Huntley, Dorothy Hosking. The Home Page

of Dorothy Hosking and Dan Huntley’s Families.

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/u/n/Dorothy-H-Huntley/WEBSITE-

0001/UHP-1074.html.

4. PETER MILLETT (d. 1615)

Peter Millett was possibly descended from William Millett who was High Sheriff of Cornwall

in 1566. Peter lived in Marazion, Cornwall. He married Elizabeth ?; they had 3 children,

Henry, Leonard and Robert. Peter died on 8 June 1615 at Madron, Cornwall.

Marazion Charter

Peter Millett was one of the 12 chief inhabitants of Marazion mentioned in the Charter of

1595. He is one of the first persons of the name of Millett found in Cornwall.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 581.

5. EMMANUEL MILLETT

Emmanuel Millett was a son of Christopher Millett (d. January 1718/19) and Honour

Angwin. He died without issue.

Bosavern

The family of Boson was established at Newlyn as early as 1584, when “Nicholas Bossen of

Newlin, husbandman” purchased some land at Keygwyn and Bojuian (Bojewyan) in St.

Yuste, from Thomas Keygwyn, of Plymouth, sailor, for £45.

In 1634 “William Bosen, merchant” and Nicholas, his son and heir, granted a lease of his

land to James Nycholas, “Tynner”. They sign their names “Boson”. In 1657 “Nicholas

Bosen of Newlvn, gentleman,” apparently the son of the last named Nicholas, having married

Elizabeth the daughter of John Webber, gentleman, deceased, made a jointure settlement on

her. Her marriage portion had been £300. In return for this, her husband appointed John

Oliver of Sithney, gent and Arthur Paynter of St. Erth, gent, as trustees to see that she

received £30 a year for life if she survived him. This annuity was to be raised from his lands

in Treungle and Hellwyn in Pawle, Keigwin and Bosèuian in St. Just, Brane in Sankrett,

11

Chirgwin and Raftra in St. Levan, Penzance, Mousehole, Newlyn and Brewinny in Paul. She

was to have the use of the mansion-house and gardens (in Newlyn) for her life.

This Nicholas Boson was evidently the student of Cornish. In 1663 he sold his lands in

Keigwin to Martyn Angwyn of St. Just, gent., and in 1664 we have a deed whereby he

conveys his two stitches of land (3/4 acre) in the close called Parke-an-Chappell in Bojewyan

alias Bosuyan in St. Just, to Richard Angwyn of St. Just, gentleman.

In a deed of 1670 “Richard Angwin of Bojewyan, gent.,” is described as son of one Martin

Angwin of Bojewyan, who was alive in 1605. In 1646 he married Grace the daughter of

Thomas Fleming of Landithy in Madron. ...

The original will of Richard Angwyn is dated October 4, 1671. ... The testator appears to

have had no children, but made his sister’s son Emanuell Millett his sole executor and

residuary legatee. ... To his nephew Emanuell Millett (son of his sister Honor by Christopher

Millett) he left all his house and lands in Bojewyan, where he lived, with the residue of his

property. ...

Source: Henderson, Charles. Nicholas Boson and Richard Angwyn. Cornish-L

Archives. http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/CORNISH/2001-01/0980902275.

6. LEONARD MILLETT (d. 1686)

Leonard Millett was the son of Leonard Millett (d. 1631). Leonard resided in Marazion,

Cornwall, and was Mayor of Marazion in 1675 and 1680, or possibly 1679 and 1683. He

had two sons, Robert Millett (1665?-1707) and Leonard Millett (d. 1716). Leonard died in

1686.

Wife and marriage

George Bown Millett, in his Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished) p. 100, gives the

name of Leonard Millett’s wife as ? Willmott.

Stephen Oram Fearon Millett, in his Modified Register for Peter Millett, 14 November 2005

(unpublished), p. 3, states that Leonard Millett married Mrs Wilmot Dunstan in 1663, and

cites Vincent Vivian Millett: "Wilmot (Unknown) widow of ... Dunstan who died ... ".

No marriage is recorded in the International Genealogical Index.

The date of marriage could perhaps be determined by the birth date of their son Robert

Millett. However, Millett Roots: Cornwall at http://roots.milletts.net/cornwall.htm gives this

date as 1650; Stephen Millett gives 1665; and the IGI gives both 1669 and 1685.

12

7. JAMES MILLETT (1647-1732)

James Millett was the 1st child of James Millett (1627-1688) and Ellinor Clies (d. 1687).

James was born in 1647, and educated at Trinity College Cambridge where he graduated

A.B. in 1670 and A.M. in 1678. He was a clergyman, Vicar of St Just-in-Penwith from 18

July 1678 to his death in April 1732 (54 years). His Patron was Charles II. James married

first Clarinda Treweeke (about 1651 to 1676) on 30 January 1672/73 at Camborne,

Cornwall; they had one child, Clarinda (about 1674-1753). James married second Loveday

Martin (about 1651-1698) on 27 July 1684 at Launcells, Cornwall; between 1685/86 and

1697 they had 6 children. James married third Thomasin Sanders (about 1651-1737) on 27

April 1703 at Sancreed, Cornwall; they had one child, Thomasin (b. about 1704). James

died in April 1732 at St Just-in-Penwith aged 85, and was buried there on 20 April 1732.

Wives

Rev James Millett is reported to have had four wives. It is also said that the posy on his last

wedding ring was “If I survive I will have five”.

Sources:

Millett, George Bown. Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished), p. 143.

Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and

topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro, Netherton and Worth,

1890, col. 575.

Wrecking

Rev James Millett is remarkable as being the parson who, on the news being brought into

church during service of a wreck (at a time when wrecking was notorious at St Just)

exclaimed “Hear but five words – let us all start fair”, and then hurrying down from the pulpit

he and his congregation left the church for the scene of the disaster.

Source: Millett, George Bown. Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished), p. 143.

Parish register

Mr. Millett wrote all the entries in the Register, in a good clear hand, to the close of 1731,

within a few months of his death, and showed but little marks of age.

Source: Buller, John. A statistical account of the Parish of Saint Just in Penwith in

the County of Cornwall, with some notice of its ecclesiastical and druidical

antiquities. Penzance, R. D. Rodda, 1842, p. 44 footnote.

13

8. ROBERT MILLETT (1665-1707)

Robert Millett was the first son of Leonard Millett (d. 1686) and Wilmot Dunstan (or ?

Willmott), who married in 1663. Robert was born in 1665. He married Margaret Oke (b.

1673); between 1692 and 1703 they had 3 children, Leonard, Robert and Jane. Robert was

Mayor of Marazion in 1694. He was probably the Secretary to Admiral Sir Cloudesley

Shovel (1650-1707). If so, he died on 22 October 1707 off the Isles of Scilly aged 42.

Death

Secretary to Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovel, and drowned with him in the wreck of H.M.S.

Association off the Isles of Scilly at 8.00 p.m. on 22 October 1707, along with 800 other men.

Sources:

Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and

topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro, Netherton and Worth,

1890, col. 568.

An account of the families of Boase or Bowes, originally residing at Paul and Madron

in Cornwall, & of other families connected with them by marriage. Truro, Netherton

and Worth for Charles William, George Clement and Frederic Boase, 1893, col. 110.

9. WILLIAM MILLETT (1690-1753)

William Millett was the 9th child of Martin Millett (about 1630-1722/23) and Ann Borlase

(1646-1729), who married on 29 April 1671 at Buryan, Cornwall. William was born on 1

October 1690 at St Just-in-Penwith, and baptised there on 18 October 1690. He married

Hannah Cornish (1696-1784) on 24 February 1716/17 at Sancreed, Cornwall, where they

lived. They had seven children. William died in February 1753 aged 63, and was buried on

7 February 1753 at St Hilary, Cornwall.

Tin bounds

In 1703 William Millett had a licence agreement on tin bounds at Gweals Vean at Treviscan,

Sennen, Cornwall. The bounds belonged to Henry Vingoe, and were let by him to William

Borlase, the son of Joseph Borlase of St Just-in-Penwith, William Millett, the son of Martin

Millett also of St Just-in-Penwith, and his own son Henry Vingoe Jnr. These bounds were

bordered on the four sides by Carn Colwidrocke, Sowen Peddenantes, Vaan Vrease and

Mean Sebmen.

Source: Pritchard, Sandra and Pritchard, George. Sennen OPC: Mining in Sennen.

http://sennenopc.vingoe.name/mining.htm.

14

10. JAMES MILLETT (1692-1743)

James Millett was the 4th child of James Millett (1647-1732) and Loveday Martin (about

1651-1698), who married on 27 July 1684 at Launcells, Cornwall. James was born on 6 July

1692 at St Just-in-Penwith, and baptised there on 6 August 1692. He was a merchant,

resident at Kelynack, Penzance, Cornwall. James married Elizabeth Angwin (b. about 1693)

on 9 September 1718 at St Levan, Cornwall; between 1721 and 1732 they had 5 children.

James died in 1743.

Bosavern

The manor of Kalinack or Killenick was formerly very extensive, embracing several of the

adjoining farms, viz: Bosavern, Hendra, Dowran, Letcha, Bosorn, and perhaps other

tenements. ...

In the beginning of the last century the manor of Collinack or Killinack was in possession of

John Nicholls, by whose trustees it was sold for the purposes mentioned in his will. Mr.

James Millett became purchaser of one part, by whom it was again sold to Mr. George

Blewett in 1742, and by whose descendants it was conveyed to the present highly esteemed

Proprietor, Joseph Carne, Esq., of Penzance, who has much improved the farm and the

village. To this gentleman I am indebted for this latter information. There is still one bed

room which had its ceiling a little ornamented, and over the chimney-piece are some

mutilated initials; an M is apparently that of a surname probably the James Millett mentioned

above: the date, 1691, is perfect. ...

Source: Buller, John. A statistical account of the Parish of Saint Just in Penwith in

the County of Cornwall, with some notice of its ecclesiastical and druidical

antiquities. Penzance, R. D. Rodda, 1842, p. 59-60.

11. LEONARD MILLETT (1692-1740)

Leonard Millett was the 1st child of Robert Millett (1665-1707) and Margaret Oke (b. 1673).

Leonard was born in 1692, and baptised on 7 May 1692 at St Hilary, Cornwall. He was a

merchant, residing in Marazion. Leonard was Mayor of Marazion in 1718 and 1719, and

possibly in 1721. He married first Jane Millett (1692-1731) on 23 June 1716 at St Hilary;

they had a number of children. He married second Grace Millett (1708-1757) on 8 June

1731 at St Just-in-Penwith; they did not have any children. Leonard died in December 1740

at Marazion aged 48, and was buried on 25 December 1740 at St Hilary.

Fishing dispute

Leonard Millett of Marazion owned both seines and drift nets and later stated that because he

and the others had been unwilling to contend any further with St. Aubyn they had agreed that

15

he should have a decree against them “for the recovery of the tithe and they had since paid

tithe for all pilchards taken in the codds and meased in the sleeves of the seines, also for

pilchards taken in drift nets and for all hook fish taken by them”.

Source: The Charter Town of Marazion. Edited by Christine North and June

Palmer. Marazion, Marazion Town Council, 1995, p. 114.

Number of children of Leonard and Jane Millett

George Bown Millett’s Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished) gives 4 children on page

100: Oke, John, Leonard and Jane; and states that they “had 6 sons living in 1743”. On

pages 104-105 he gives 8 children: Humphry, Robert, George, William, James, John,

Leonard and Jane.

George Clement Boase’s Collectanea Cornubiensia (1890) cols. 568-569 gives 8 children:

Humphry, Robert, George, William, James, John, Leonard, Jane.

Colin Kennedy’s FTM tree gives 12 children: Jane, Jane, Oke, John, Humphrey, Leonard,

James, Robert, William, George, John, Leonard.

Stephen Millett’s FTM tree gives 8 children: Oke, John, Jane, Humphrey, Robert, William,

George, James.

Will

The Will of Leonard Millett written 15th July 1738, and proved 19th February 1740

In the name of God Amen. I Leonard Millett of the Town of Marazion in ye County of

Cornwall Mercht being in pritty good health of body, & of sound mind, memory, &

understanding, (praise be to God for the same) considdering ye frailty & uncertainty of this

mortal life, do make & ordain this my last Will & Testament in manner & form following.

Impr : I commend my Soul into ye hand of Allmighty God my Creator, hoping for a full &

free pardon of all my sins through ye merits & mediation of my blessed Saviour & redeemer

Jesus Christ, & my body I commit to ye earth to be decently buried at ye discretion of my

Executrs herein after named, & as touching ye disposition of all my temporal estate wherewth

it hath pleased God to bless me wth, I give & dispose thereof, as followeth.

Item : My will & desire is yt all my just Debts & funeral charges be paid as soon as

conveniently may be after my Death.

Item : My will & desire is yt my Executrs hereafter named & herein mentioned do pay

immediately after my Death ye summ of Thirty Pounds unto my dearly beloved wife Grace

Millett in lieu of her first years annuity, made due & payable to her in & by my Marriage

Articles wth her, & I do hereby order, direct, & appoint yt (as a farther & better Security of

ye Payment of ye sd Annuity settled upon her in & by my Marriage Articles wth her) my

Premises called the new Premesis, ? , the Barn, Stable & ? , adjoining to my garden Situate

lying & being in Marazion aforesaid do stand & be subject & lyable to ye Payment of ye sd

Annuity in such manner & form as is mentioned in & by ye sd Articles, any thing contained

to ye contrary hereof in & by ye Marriage Articles in any wise not wthstanding & be lyable to

entry & distress from time to time for non payment in ye like manner as my other Lands in ye

sd Articles mentioned are subject to for payment thereof, & I do hereby order & direct yt my

sd Executrs do at ye end of Twelve months hence next after my Death pay unto my sd wife

ye Summ of one Hundred Pounds the delivering up to them one Bond or penal Bill bearing

date on or abt ye 10th day of 9br 1731, entred into by me unto Tobias Harry of ye Parish of

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Ludgven Gentleman for the same in trust for her, my said wife to have all my ? , my best Tea

Kettle, and also ye side or dressing table wth the Glass belonging, & new Chest of Drawers,

all wth stands in my own Lodging Chamber a silver Ladel & sauce pan her own, the Sum of

Fifteen pounds to buy her a mourning suit, I give her likewise during her life the best fire

things, ye Tea Chest, ye best Diaper Table Cloth, one dozen and half of ye London Pewter

Plates & the four London Pewter dishes, I give her also in case she will live in it & no longer

the House wherein my Sister in Law Ann Pascoe widdow now lives in, in Marazion aforesd,

after ye death of ye sd Ann Pascoe during ye life time of my sd wife (she living in it as

aforesd, & not otherwise) in case my Estate & Term (?) therein shall so long continue, the

repairing of ye same & paying a proportionable part of ye Lords Rents, dues, Taxes & out

goings to be paid for the same.

Item : I give & bequeath unto my Sons, Humphry, William, George & James, the Summ of

Two Hundred & Eighty Pounds each, to be paid to them respectively as they shall

respectively attain ye age of twenty one years, & if any or either of yin happen to die before

they come to yt age of twenty one years, or if my Daughter Jane die before she attain yt age

of twenty one years, or be married, then & in such case, the legacy of such of them so dying

shall go & be distributed among ye Survivours of them & my sd daughter Jane & son Robert,

share & share alike, & my Will is yt they be maintained all ye six of them & educated at ye

charge of my Executrs until they come to age according to ye directions & discretion of my

Trustees herein after named.

Item : I give unto my Daughter Jane ye Summ of Three Hundred Pounds to be paid her

when she shall attain to ye age of twenty one, but in case she marries wth Walter Thomas of

Scilly who served his time wth John Hill carpenter, I only give her then five pounds & ye

other Two Hundred & ninety five pounds I give to be divided equally between my Son Oke

Millett & his younger brothers, share & share alike.

Item : I give unto my Son Robert, one Hundred & Eighty pounds of lawfull mony of Great

Brittain, to be paid him when & as soon as he shall attain ye age of twenty one years & to be

maintained & educated at ye charge of my Executor until he comes to ye age of one & twenty

years, & I do hereby give devise & bequeath unto my Said Son Robert all ye dwelling

houses, messuages, Fields, Closes, & stitches aparcel of land wth the appurtances called ye

Millways, wth in as large & ample manner as ye same is granted by ye Lease, I lately took to

Lease from Lord Godolphin to hold to him during my Esate (?) & Tearm (?) therein after he

shall attain ye age of one & Twenty years, after ye death of my Sister in law Ann Pascoe

(excepting only ye House where in my Sister in law Ann Pascoe now lives) during ye life

time of my sd wife she living in it, & in case my son Robert die before he attaind ye age of

Twenty one years when ye sd Hundred & Eighty Pounds herein & before given shall be

divided between ye rest of my younger children who shall be then living share & share alike.

Item : I give to ye poor of ye Town of Marazion Fifty shillings to be paid them immediately

after my death.

Item : All yerest of my Goods, Chattels, Lands, Tenements, Hereditaments & premises

wtsoever & wheresoever, I do hereby give devise & bequeath unto my Eldest Son Oke

Millett, he paying my Debts & Legacies thereout, & I do hereby nominate constitute &

appoint my beloved friends Humphry Millett of Ennis Gentl, James Millett of Penzance

Mercht, Tobias Harry of ye Parish of Ludgvan Gentl & George Blewett of Relubbas Mercht,

Trustees & Executrs of this my last Will & Testament in Trust for my Son Oke Millett &

yerest of my Children & I do desire my said executors to bind out my younger Children to

such Trades & employments as they shall think most convenient, ye charge of binding out my

sd Children to be educated & taken out of their respective Legacies, & my will & mind is yt

if my said son Oke shall happen to die before he shall attain ye age of Twenty one years, yt

then all my Lands, Tenements, Goods, Chattels, & effects, he shall die ? of as executr of this

17

my will, shall descend & fall to my son Humphry if he be living, & if he shall happen to die,

then to my third son Robert, & if he shall happen to die, then to my fourth son William & so

on to each of my Sons, as they shall be in seniority of age & priority of birth yt the same may

not be divided among my younger children.

Item : I give to each of my sd Executrs one guinea to buy a mourning ring, & I do hereby

revoke, disa??, & make void all former wills by me, at any time heretofore made, In witness

hereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal this 15th day of July in ye yr of our Lord God one

Thousand Seven hundred thirty Eight. being writ on two sheets of paper annexd to each

other.

Signed, Sealed, published & declared by ye Testator in our presence & we have hereunto

subscribed our names as witnesses hereunto in presence of ye Testator.

Codicil to the Will of Leonard Millett

The Twenty Third Day of December 1740.

I Leonard Millett of the Town of Marazion in the County of Cornwall Merchant being weak

and sick in body but of sound & disposing mind memory and understanding do hereby make

this as a Codicill to my Last Will and Testament.

Impr : That who was my Daughter Jane is very lately deceased (?) to whom I bequeathed

two hundred pounds now I do hereby give bequeath the said two hundred pounds to my son

Humphry Millett to be paid when the Legacy given him by my will shall become due and that

my said Son Humphry be bound out an apprentice to an apothecary.

Item : That my wife shall have the house I now live in in Marazion during her life and tis

my desire that my son Oak (sic) Millett after his apprenticeship is expired shod move home

and live in friendship with his mother and live with her therein.

Item : I desire that eight pounds be given to the poor of Marazion with Forty shillings to be

paid immediately at my death and forty shillings quarterly until the full sum be paid.

Witness my hand and seal this day and year abovementioned

Signed sealed published and delivered as a codicill to the last Will and Testament of the said

Leonard Millett in presence of [signatures].

Notes

The original will was written on 15th July 1738. The codicil was dated 23rd December

1740. The will was proved on 19th February 1740, however in the probate document

reference is made to the fourteenth year of the reign of King George the Second (1727 + 14 =

1741?) as well as the conventional form 1740, otherwise the error would be in the date of the

codicil which perhaps should be 1739.

It must have slipped Leonard’s mind that in his original will he gave £300 to his daughter

Jane, not the £200 he mentioned in the codicil.

In the handwritten text a character similar to y is used for the sound th, so ye means the.

Other strange spellings and grammar are as in the original. Some words not decipherable are

replaced or indicated by a ?.

Source:

Bequests

Leonard was described as a merchant. His status can be clearly seen for he was able in his

will to leave his six sons well provided for: four of them were left £280 each, Robert was left

18

£180 together with some land, and the residue of the estate was left to his eldest son, Oke.

His daughter Jane was to have £300 but “in case she marries Walter Thomas of Scilly who

served his time with John Hill carpenter, I only give her £5”. This provision was never

queried for Jane died after the will was written but before her father.

His widow, Grace, died twelve years after her husband. She, as many others in Marazion,

left some money to charity, in her case £16 to poor widows in the town, as well as other

charitable bequests. The possessions mentioned in the wills of both Leonard and Grace,

including a best tea kettle, a dressing table with glass, a diamond ring, a silver ladle, a swing

looking glass and a silver snuff box, her clothes and books suggest a family living in some

style.

Source: The Charter Town of Marazion. Edited by Christine North and June

Palmer. Marazion, Marazion Town Council, 1995, p. 27-28.

12. ROBERT MILLETT (1694/95-1731/32)

Robert Millett was the 5th child of James Millett (1647-1732) and Loveday Martin (about

1651-1698), who married on 27 July 1684 at Launcells, Cornwall. Robert was born on 7

January 1694/95 at St Just-in-Penwith, Cornwall, and was baptised there on 22 January

1694/95. He graduated A.B. from Pembroke College Cambridge in 1716. He was a

clergyman, Vicar of St Stythian’s Church, Stithians, Cornwall. Robert married Isabella ?

about 1721 at Saltash, Cornwall; between 1721 and 1731 they had 5 children. Robert died

in March 1731/32 aged 37, and was buried on 1 April 1732 at St Stythians.

Life and death

Robert Millett was born at St. Just on 7 January 1695; matriculated at Pembroke College,

Cambridge in 1713; B.A. 1716/7; curate at St. Just 1718, (perpetual curate 9 June 1718); at

Saltash 1724; at Perranarworthal & Stithians 1726-1732, (perpetual curate of Stithians 14

Sept. 1728); and for some time in 1730 also curate at Falmouth. ... “Mr. Robert Mellat” was

buried at Stithians on 1 April 1732, aged only 37. There is little doubt that the news of his

early demise came as a very heavy blow to his old father at St. Just, who may well have been

hoping for his son in due course to “step into his shoes”. As it was he followed him only

nineteen days later. Isabella was appointed administrator of Robert’s goods, being bound in

the sum of £300 together with his elder brother, James Millett of St. Just, gent., and Hugh

Busvargus of St. Just, who was Robert’s half-sister Clarinda’s husband.

Under their grandfather’s will, Thomasine received 40/-, and James 20/-. Their mother

received nothing. Robert was to have received a half-share of the residue of his father’s

estate; but due to his dying first, the whole of this may have remained to James Millett’s

third wife, Thomasin (nee Sanders), who was childless. ...

Source: Millett, Vincent Vivian. A Hampshire sailor in Devonport. Devon and

Cornwall Notes and Queries vol. 29, 1962-64, p. 227-230.

19

13. ELLIANOR MILLETT

Ellianor Millett was the daughter of Richard Millett (b. about 1658) and Honor Trenhayle (b.

about 1662), who married on 27 January 1682/83 at St Hilary, Cornwall.

The will of Ann Pascoe (née Millett), written in July 1740, refers to “Ellianor Millitt, dau. of

late uncle Richd Millett”.

Source: Millett, Stephen Oram Fearon. Modified register for Peter Millett, 14

November 2005 (unpublished), p. 11.

14. ANN MILLETT (b. 1702)

Ann Millett was the 8th child of John Millett (about 1666-1744) and Joan Davies (about

1670-1731), who married on 17 December 1691 at St Hilary, Cornwall. Ann was born in

1702, and baptised on 26 December 1702 at St Hilary. She married William Rogers (about

1698-1734) on 8 January 1722/23 at St Hilary.

Inheritance of house at Skewis

An event occurred at Skewis in 1734, that should not pass unnoticed. Skewis had been for a

long time the freehold patrimony of a succession of proprietors of the name of Rogers.

About this time there were two brothers; the elder married and lived on the farm, but without

a family; the younger brother, Henry Rogers, married and had children. He carried on the

trade of a pewterer in Helston. He has not been represented as having been a bad man, but as

one little in the habit of restraining his passions, of great bodily strength, and of a wilful

disposition ; and his prejudices were probably supported by an opinion, generally prevalent,

that freehold lands, which have once descended to an heir, cannot be alienated without the

concurrence of the next heir.

The elder brother died, and by his will gave the whole of his freehold property to his widow,

whose maiden name was Millett. Under the impression that the will was spurious, and

despising legal remedies, he waited for an opportunity when his sister-in-law was from home,

turned the servants out of the house, and took forcible possession. The widow appealed to

the law, with the voice of the whole country, however, against her; and it is universally

reported that Sir John St. Aubyn would have supported Rogers, in a legal proceeding.

However that may be he prepared for violence, and refused to yield up possession when

judgement was given against him; so that the sheriff was at last directed to eject him by

force. But Rogers got several persons to remain with him in the house, which had been

barricaded for defence, and great numbers of people, partly from curiosity, but in part also to

countenance his resistance, having assembled on the spot, the civil power was completely

resisted, and two men killed by shots from the house; the under sheriff himself having

20

narrowly escaped, the discharge of a gun from the house having burnt his wig and singed his

face. This occurred on the 8th of June, 1734.

On the following day the under sheriff came back assisted by some soldiers, who were fired

on, and one killed. They returned the fire, but without effect. And then, strange as it may

appear, Rogers was allowed to remain undisturbed till March of the following year, when he

was again blockaded by soldiers; and the siege continued for some days with the loss of two

more men, when at last cannon were brought from Pendennis Castle. On the night following

their arrival, Rogers effected his escape. He travelled on foot as far as Salisbury, with the

intention, as he stated, of making his case known to the King.

Sir John St. Aubyn now took an active part in endeavouring to secure the fugitive, and being

through his marriage, connected with the Earls of Pembroke, who resided in the

neighbourhood of Salisbury, handbills descriptive of Rogers were circulated round that town.

It was said that a post boy, driving homewards a return chaise, was accosted by a stout man

walking with a gun in his hand, requesting to ride. The post boy drove him to the inn, where

he procured a bed; but the circumstances and deseription had excited strong suspicion, and he

was secured in his sleep. He was at once removed to Cornwall. At the time of his escape he

had on a drab fustian frock, with bastard pearl buttons, and a blue riding coat. A reward of

£350 was offered for his capture.

At the assizes at Launceston, August 1st, 1735, came on before Lord Chief Justice Hardwick,

the trials of Henry Rogers, and John Street, one of his assistants, for the murder of William

Carpenter, George Woolston alias Wilson, and Andrew Willis, alias Tubby. They were both

found guilty, and sentenced to death. After conviction they appeared to be very penitent,

particularly Rogers, who did not care for any sustenance but bread and water. He said he was

guilty of one of the murders, but knew nothing of the other, yet had it been in his power, he

would have killed as many more, and thought he committed no crime. Street, who was his

servant, had little to say, but that what he did was to defend his master, and he was willing to

die, for by the course of nature he could not live much longer, and he hoped God would

receive his poor soul. They were executed on the 6th August, 1735.

Although no one attempted to justify the violence, and especially the murders committed by

Rogers, yet long after the occurence a strong feeling of compassion was entertained for him.

The marks of the bullets are still to be seen in the house at Skewis; and there is a popular

notion in the neighbourhood that none of the subsequent proprietors have prospered in its

possession. The property is still in the family of Millett.

Sources:

Polsue, Joseph. A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall, compiled

from the best authorities and corrected and improved from actual survey. Truro,

William Lake, 1867-1872. 4 v. Vol. 1, p. 269-270.

See also Gilbert, Davies. The parochial history of Cornwall, founded on the

manuscript histories of Mr. Hals and Mr. Tonkin; with additions and various

appendices. Vol. 1. London, J. B. Nichols and Son, 1838, p. 267ff.

21

Another account

A strange circumstance occurred in 1734 at Skewis, close to the line from Gwinear Road

Station to Helston.

Skewis had been for many generations the freehold patrimony of a yeoman family of the

name of Rogers. There were two brothers. The elder married and lived on the farm, but

without a family. The younger brother, Henry Rogers, was married and had several children.

He carried on for several years in Helston the trade of a pewterer, then of considerable

importance in Cornwall, although it is now at an end. A large portion of the tin raised was

mixed with lead and exported in the form of pewter made into dishes, plates, etc., now

superseded by earthenware. At the first introduction of earthenware, called cloam, in the

West of England, a strong prejudice existed against it as liable to damage the tin trade, and it

was a popular cry to destroy all cloam, so as to bring back the use of pewter.

The elder Rogers died, and bequeathed the house of Skewis and the farm and everything

thereon to his wife Anne. Henry was indignant. He believed in the inalienability of “heir

land”. He was suspicious that Anne Rogers would make over Skewis to her own relatives,

of the name of Millett. Henry waited his opportunity, when his sister-in-law was out of the

house, to enter it and bring in his wife and children and servants. He turned out the domestics

of Anne, and occupied the whole house.

The widow appealed to law, but the voice of the whole county was against her, and the

general opinion was that the will had been extorted from her husband. Even Sir John St

Aubyn, living at Clowance, hard by, favoured him, and had Henry Rogers acted in a

reasonable manner would have backed him up. But Rogers took the law into his own hands,

and when a judgment was given against him, he still refused to surrender.

The Sheriff of Cornwall accordingly was directed to eject him by force. Rogers, however,

barricaded the house, and prepared to defend it. He supplied himself with gunpowder and

slugs, and cut loopholes in his doors and shutters from which to fire at the assailants.

On June 18th, 1734, the Under-Sheriff and posse went to Skewis and demanded the surrender

of the house. From two to three hundred people attended, for the most part sympathisers with

Rogers, but not willing to render him effectual assistance.

As the Under-Sheriff, Stephen Tillie, persisted in his demands, and threatened to break into

the house, Rogers fired. The bullet passed through Tillie’s wig, singed it, and greatly

frightened him, especially as with the next discharge one of his officers fell at his side, shot

through the head.

Several guns were fired, and then the Under-Sheriff deemed it advisable to withdraw and

send for soldiers.

On the arrival of a captain with some regulars, Tillie again approached, when Rogers

continued firing, and killed a bailiff and shot a soldier in the groin. Two more men were

wounded, and then the military fired at the windows, but did no harm. Mrs. Rogers stood by

her husband, loading and handing him his gun.

22

The whole attacking party now considering that discretion constituted the best part of valour,

withdrew, and Rogers was allowed to remain in possession till March in the following year,

that is to say, for nine months. Then he was again blockaded by soldiers, and the siege

continued for several days, with the loss of two more men, when at last cannon were brought

from Pendennis Castle.

Many years after, one of Rogers’ sons gave the following account of his reminiscences of the

siege : —

“He recollected that his father was fired at, and had a snuff-box and powder-horn broken in

his pocket by a ball. He recollected that whilst he himself (then a child) was in the bed

several balls came in through the window of the room, and after striking against the wall

rolled about on the floor. One brother and sister who were in the house went out to inquire

what was wanted of their father, and they were not permitted to return. On the last night no

one remained in the house but his father, himself, and the servant-maid. In the middle of the

night they all went out, and got some distance from the house. In crossing a field, however,

they were met by two soldiers, who asked them their business. The maid answered that they

were looking for a cow, when they were permitted to proceed. The soldiers had their arms,

and his father had his gun. The maid and himself were left at a farmhouse in the

neighbourhood”.

Henry Rogers, whom the soldiers had not recognised in the darkness, managed to escape, and

pushed on in the direction of London, resolving to lay his grievances before the king. He was

dressed in a whitish fustian frock, with imitation pearl buttons, and a blue riding-coat over it.

As soon as it was discovered that he had decamped, a reward of £350 was offered for his

apprehension. He had already shot and killed five men, and had wounded seven. He was

not, however, taken till he reached Salisbury Plain, where he hailed a postboy, who was

returning with an empty chaise, and asked for a lift. He was still carrying his gun. The boy

drove him to the inn, where he procured a bed; but the circumstances, and the description,

had excited suspicion; he was secured in his sleep, and was removed to Cornwall, to be tried

for murder at Launceston along with his servingman, John Street.

His trial took place on August 1st, 1735, before Lord Chief Justice Hardwicke. Rogers was

arraigned upon five indictments, and Street upon two. Both received sentence of death, and

were executed on August 6th.

The house at Skewis has been recently in part rebuilt, when a bag of the slugs used by poor

Rogers was found.

It is in Crowan parish.

Source: Baring-Gould, Sabine. A Book of Cornwall. New ed. London, Methuen,

1906, p. 292-296.

Henry Rogers (d. 6 August 1735) was the brother of Ann Millett’s husband, William Rogers

(about 1698-1734).

23

15. HUMPHRY MILLETT (d. 1704)

Humphry Millett was the son of William Millett. He lived at Ennys, Enys or Ninnis, St

Hilary, Cornwall. Humphry married Margaret Rogers (d. 1712); they had 3 children, John,

Elizabeth and Margaret. Humphry died on 19 May 1704.

Humphry Millett is believed to have built Ennys in 1688. The house still exists in 2002, and

has an inscription on the lintel “16 H + M 88”.

Source: Millett, Stephen Oram Fearon. Modified register for Peter Millett, 14

November 2005 (unpublished), p. 4.

16. GRACE MILLETT (1708-1757)

Grace Millett was the 7th child of Robert Millett (about 1651-1728) and Honor Trefuses

(about 1670-1735), who married in 1691 at Manaccan, Cornwall. Grace was born in 1708.

She married Leonard Millett (1692-1740) on 8 June 1731 at St Just-in-Penwith, Cornwall.

Grace died in 1757 without issue aged 49.

Bequests

Grace died twelve years after her husband. She, as many others in Marazion, left some

money to charity, in her case £16 to poor widows in the town, as well as other charitable

bequests. The possessions mentioned in the wills of both Leonard and Grace, including a

best tea kettle, a dressing table with glass, a diamond ring, a silver ladle, a swing looking

glass and a silver snuff box, her clothes and books suggest a family living in some style.

Source: The Charter Town of Marazion. Edited by Christine North and June

Palmer. Marazion, Marazion Town Council, 1995, p. 27-28.

Will

The will of Grace Millett, second wife of Leonard Millett of Marazion, who died in 1760.

The will was proved on 12th May 1760.

In the Name of God Amen I Grace Millett of the Town of Marazion in the

County of Cornwall Widow being of a sound and disposing Mind Memory and

Understanding (Praise be to God for the Same) altho weak in Body duly considering the

frailty and uncertainty of this Mortal Life do make and ordain this to be my last Will and

Testament in manner following that is to say

24

First and principally I resign my Soul unto God my Gracious Creator who gave it me utterly

disdaining all hope or belief in the efficacy of my own merits, but entirely trusting in the Sole

merits of my Blessed Saviour & Redeemer Jesus Christ for a perfect forgiveness of all my

Sins & a joyfull Resurrection to Life Eternal.

Secondly I request my Executor herein after named to cause my Body to be buried in a

decent and Christian Like manner and as near the Body of my late Husband as conveniently

may be, and my debts and funeral Charges to be paid as soon after my Death as conveniently

may be done by them.

And as to those worldly Goods Chattles and Effects wheresowith it hath pleased God of his

Goodness to bless me in order to prevent any Dispute which may arise after my Death

concerning the same, I do hereby give bequeath and direct them to be distributed in Manner

following that is to say

Impr I give and bequeath unto the Mayor Alderman Chapple Wardens and Overseers of the

poor of the Town of Marazion aforesaid for the Time being, and to the Vicar of the parish of

St Hillary for the time being Sixteen pounds to be paid them by my Executor herein after

named at the End of One Year next after my Decease, which said Sum I do desire and direct

may be by them lent or placed out at Interest on good Security, and the annual Interest thereof

laid out in Beef and distributed annually on Christmas Eve to such poor widows of Marazion

aforesaid as shall receive no Relief from the poor rates of the said Town, and in such manner

as the said Mayor Alderman Chaplewardens and Overseers shall think most proper.

Item I give and bequeath to such Poor Widows aforementioned & described fifty shillings

to be distributed among them by my Executor herein after named imediately after my Death

in such Manner as they shall think most proper.

Item I give and bequeath to such poor widows of the parish of Illogan in the said County as

receive no Benefit or Relief from the poor rates of the said parish five pounds to be paid to

the Churchwardens and Overseers of the poor of the said parish some or one of them

immediately after my Death, and to be by them distributed in Such Manner as they shall think

most proper.

Item I give and bequeath to such poor Widows of the parish of St Hillary aforesd as

receive no Relief from the poor rates of the said parish fifty shillings to be paid to the Church

wardens & Overseers of the poor of the said parish some or one of them immediately after

my Death, and to be by them distributed in such manner as they shall think most proper.

Item I give and bequeath to the Mayor Aldermen and Chapelwarden of Marazion aforesaid

for the time being Seven pounds for the use of the Chaplain or Lectivror (?) of Marazion

aforesaid, to be paid him seven equall payments of twenty shillings each annually at Easter,

the said seven pounds to be paid to the said Mayor Aldermen and Chaplewardens at the End

of One Year next after my Decease.

Item I give and bequeath unto Leonard Son of my Son in Law Mr Oke Millett of Marazion

aforesaid ten pounds, and to Elizabeth and Jane his Daughters five pounds each, and to his

wife five pounds to be paid the said Oke Millett for their use at the end of one year next after

my decease. I likewise give and bequeath to the said Oke Millett a folio Book called an

Exposition on the new Testament together with the swing looking glass, the Dressing table

and the tea chest which were given me by his late father. I likewise give to his wife my Chest

of Drawers and my black Paduasoye Gown to be delivered them immediately after my

decease.

Item I give and bequeath to my Son in Law Mr Humphrey Millett of Penzance twenty

pounds and to his Daughter Grace five pounds to be paid the said Humphrey Millett at the

End of one Year next after my Decease. I likewise give and bequeath to the said Humphrey

25

the Silver Snuff box which was given me by his late father I likewise give to his wife my

green paduasoye Gown, and to his daughter Jane my diamond ring, I also give to the said

Humphrey the two China Mugs which Mr Tyson gave me to be delivered them immediately

after my Decease.

Item I give and bequeath to my Son in Law Mr George Millett of Helstone, twenty pounds

to be paid him at the End of One Year next after my Decease, I likewise give him a Blew and

white China Bowl to be delivered him immediately after my Decease.

Item I give and Bequeath to my Son in Law Mr James Millett of Helstone twenty pounds,

and to his daughter Grace my Goddaughter five pounds to be paid him at the End on One

Year next after my Decease. I also give him one Dozen of Blew and white China plates to be

delivered to him immediately after my Decease.

Item I give and bequeath to my Son in Law Mr William Millett of Marazion twenty pounds

and to his wife five pounds to be paid him at the End on One year next after my Decease. I

also give him my China Caudle cup and my Book called Nelson’s Feasts and fasts to be

delivered him immediately after my Decease.

Item I give and bequeath all my best Lace between the wives of the aforementioned William

Millett George Millett and James Millett to be equally divided between them.

Item I give and bequeath to Mr Humphrey Cole and to Mr William Thomson both of

Marazion aforesaid One Guinea each to be paid them at the End of one Year next after my

Decease.

Item I give and bequeath to Elizabeth Hugh Spinster who now lives with me, Daughter of

William Hugh of Marazion aforesaid Mason Thirty pounds to be paid her at the End of One

Year next after my Decease.

Item I give and bequeath to Mrs Sibella Fudge and to Mrs Mary Laity of Marazion

aforesaid widows One Guinea each and to Catharine Davy and to Honour the wife of John

Meyer of the same ten shillings and six pence each to be paid them respectively immediately

after my Decease.

Item I give and bequeath to Mrs Martha Thomas the Mourning Ring which I had for her

Aunt Mrs Elizabeth Ekinos.

Item I give and bequeath to my Sister Jane Millett twenty pounds I also give and bequeath

unto Ann the Daughter of the aforementioned William Hugh and Wife of James Millett of

Marazion aforesaid five pounds, to be paid them respectively at the End of One Year next

after my Decease.

Item I give and bequeath unto Eleanor Millett and Honour Millett of Marazion aforesaid

five pounds each to be paid them respectively at four equall quarterly payments of twenty

five Shillings each at Easter, Midsummer, Michaelmas and Christmas successively, the first

quarterly payment whereof to be made at the first of the said feasts which shall happen next

after my Decease.

Item I give and bequeath unto my sister Hannah Millett five pounds to be paid her at the end

on One Year next after my Decease, I likewise give her for her own use only during her life

time all my plate, and from and immediately after her Death I give and devise the same to

Leonard the Son of my Son in Law Robert Millett of Marazion aforesaid.

Item I give and bequeath unto Elizabeth the Daughter of Edward Mellen late of Marazion

aforesaid Taylor five pounds to be paid her at the End of One Year next after my Decease.

Item I give and bequeath unto Sarah the wife of Mr John Vigurs of Penzance and to

Loveday her Sister the wife of Mr John Maddern Junr of St Just to each a Gold Ring with a

Ruby Stone.

26

Item I give and bequeath unto the two Youngest Children of my Cosin Robert Millett of

Marazion aforesaid One Guinea each to be paid them immediately after my Decease.

Item I give and bequeath unto my Sister Elizabeth the Wife of the aforementioned William

Hugh my long hood and Cloak, my Scarlett cloak and Velvet Hood, four of my common

Shifts, two Holland Aprons, a Large Silk and Muslin Handkerchief and two inside petticoats,

And to my sister Jane aforenamed I give and bequeath my lustring Gown, and all the peires

belonging to it, two of my best Holland aprons A white Quilted outside petticoat my Striped

Muslin Cap and Ruffles, Two of my plain Cambrick half handkerchiefs and one of my best

inside quilted petticoats, also I give my said sister Jane, the Comon prayer book I use in the

Chaple together with my Book called the Imitation of Jesus Christ, To be delivered them

respectively, immediately after my Death. And all the rest of my Wearing Apparell of what

Kind or Quality Soever I give and bequeath unto Hannah the wife of the aforementioned

Robert Millett my Son in Law and to the aforenamed Elizabeth Hugh Spinster who now lives

with me, to be equally divided between them.

Item I give and bequeath unto my aforementioned Sister Elizabeth Hugh the Wife of the

said William Hugh an Annuity or Yearly Sum of four pounds to be paid her during her

natural Life at four equall quarterly payments of twenty shillings each at Easter Midsummer

Michaelmas and Christmas, the first of the said Quarterly payments to be made at the first of

the said feasts which shall happen next after my Decease And my will is that the said annuity

and the Several Quarterly payments thereof shall be paid Her independent of her said

Husband and be for her Sole and Separate Use and Benefitt and not lyable to any Debt or

Demands of her said Husband.

Item I give and bequeath unto Leonard the Son of my said Son in Law Robert Millett the

Sum of two Hundred pounds and to Robert the son of the said Robert twenty pounds to be

paid them respectively as and when they shall have attained the Age of twenty one Years

respectively In the mean time my Will is and I do hereby direct that the said several sums of

two hundred pounds and twenty pounds shall be laid out in the same publick Security by my

executor herein aforenamed as soon after my Death as he conveniently can, and from and out

of the yearly interest and produce thereof that my said Executor shall and do pay to my

aforenamed Sister Elizabeth Hugh the annuity of four pounds herein before mentioned in

such mannor as is hereinbefore specified concerning the same.

Item I give and bequeath unto Elizabeth Millett Daughter of Mr James Millett late of

Penzance deceased One Guinea to be paid her at the End of One Year next after my Decease.

Item I give and bequeath farther to Jane the Daughter of my aforementioned Son in Law

Humphrey Millett ten pounds to be paid at the End of one year next after my Decease.

Item I give and bequeath to Mrs Amy Mowgham of ... widow such of Dr ... Works as I

have and to Mrs Mary Clutterbuck Wife of Mr Thomas Clutterbuck of Marazion aforesaid

the book which Mrs Spry gave me being Archbishop Tillotson’s Works to be delivered them

immediately after my Death. All the Rest Residue Remainder of any Goods Chattles Rights

Credits and Effects whatsoever and wheresoever I give and bequeath unto my aforenamed

Son in Law Robert Millett of Marazion aforesaid, And I do hereby nominate and appoint my

said Son in Law Robert Millett to be whole and sole Executor of this my Last Will and

Testament, and my aforementioned Sons in Law William Millett and James Millett

adjudicators and Overseers of the same, to see my said Will duly performed and Executed.

And I do hereby revoke all former Wills by me at any time heretofore made, and do hereby

publish and declare this to be my last Will and Testament. In witness whereof I have hereto

set my hand and seal this thirteenth day of Aprill in the Year of our Lord One thousand Seven

Hundred and fifty Seven.

27

Signed Sealed published and declared

by the said Testatrix as and for her last Will and

Testament the day and year afore written (the same

being written on three sheets of paper) in Presence

of us

(Thos Clutterbuck

John Kier)

Source:

17. HUMPHRY MILLETT (1723-1757)

Humphry Millett was the 5th child of Leonard Millett (1692-1740) and Jane Millett (1692-

1731), who married on 23 June 1716 at St Hilary, Cornwall. Humphry was born in 1723,

and baptised on 13 October 1723 at St Hilary. He was a mercer. He lived in St Just-in-

Penwith. Humphry married Elizabeth Adams (about 1721-1757) on 20 February 1745/46 at

St Just-in-Penwith; they had 5 children. Humphry died on 3 June 1757 at Penzance aged

34.

Children

Humphry and Elizabeth both died of fever in June 1757. Mr John Tonkin, M.R.C.S., was

lodging in the house at the time of the early deaths of Mr and Mrs Millett, he took care of the

children and supplied the place of a father to them. The children were under the charge of a

cousin, Miss Peggy Williams, who also carried on the mercery business.

Sources:

An account of the families of Boase or Bowes, originally residing at Paul and Madron

in Cornwall, & of other families connected with them by marriage. Truro, Netherton

and Worth for Charles William, George Clement and Frederic Boase, 1893, col. 110.

Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and

topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro, Netherton and Worth,

1890, col. 568.

18. ANN MILLETT (née Sandys) (1724-1806)

Ann Sandys was the 5th child of Sampson Sandys (d. 1764) and Philippa Thomas (d. 1764).

Ann was born in 1724, and baptised on 22 June 1724 at Helston, Cornwall. She married

George Millett (1724-1781) on 4 February 1751/52 at Helston; between 1753 and 1764 they

28

had 10 children. Ann died on 26 March 1806 at Helston, and was buried there on 30 March

1806 aged 82.

Monument in Helston Church

Near this place are deposited the remains of Mrs. Ann Millett; whose unaffected piety,

meekness, and resignation, were equally conspicuous. After an inoffensive life of eighty-two

years she died with a composed spirit, and in a firm hope of redemption, on the 26th of

March, 1806; beloved, honoured, and lamented.

Source: Polsue, Joseph. A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall,

compiled from the best authorities and corrected and improved from actual survey.

Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872. 4 v. Vol. 2, p. 171.

19. JAMES MILLETT (b. about 1729)

James Millett was the fourth child of Robert Millett (1694/95-1731/32) and Isabella ?, who

married about 1721 at Saltash, Cornwall. James was born about 1729, and baptised on 9

August 1729 at Stithians, Cornwall.

Family

For possible marriage and descendants of James Millett, see Millett, Vincent Vivian. A

Hampshire sailor in Devonport. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries vol. 29, 1962-64, p.

227-230.

20. HUMPHRY MILLETT (1744/45-1774)

Humphry Millett was the first son of Humphry Millett (1694-1750) and Grace Polwhele (b.

about 1698), who married on 26 June 1740 at St Clement, Cornwall. Humphry was born on

1 March 1744/45, and baptised on 2 April 1745 at St Hilary, Cornwall. He matriculated

from Exeter College, University of Oxford on 11 March 1762. He was a clergyman. He

resided at Enys, St Hilary. Humphry married Mary Sandys (1742-1819) on 19 December

1765 at Helston, Cornwall; they had two children, Mary (1766-1813) and Grace (1772-

1868). Humphry died on 16 November 1774 at Enys, St Hilary aged 29, and was buried at St

Hilary.

Ennys

See 98. Ennys (below).

29

Legal action

Humphry Millett brought an action against John Blewett, the son of George Blewett, one of

his father’s executors, to recover some shares in the Great Work Mine near Helston, Cornwall

and the dividends on them. The case was tried in the Exchequer 17 December 1772 and

decided in his favour, and on an appeal to the House of Lords 28 February 1774 the

judgement was affirmed. Cf. Josiah Browne’s Cases in Parliament (1803) vii, 367-374.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 574.

Blewett v. Millett

Nothing is better established as a general proposition than that where a trustee for an infant

renews a lease in his own name, the renewed lease shall enure for the infant’s benefit. This is

a doctrine founded on general policy to prevent frauds, and has long been an established rule

in the Courts of Equity.

The present is a glaring instance of the apparent contradiction between the state of the case as

adopted by the original Editor, and the determination of the courts.

28th February 1774

John Blewett, Appellant

Humphry Millett, Respondent

HUMPHRY MILLETT, the respondent’s father, was in his lifetime a considerable adventurer

in mines; and his concerns therein were attended with that variety of success, which is usual

in all undertakings of so precarious a nature. Among other shares of mines which Mr. Millett

was entitled to at the time of his death, were seven thirty-second parts of a certain tin mine in

the parish of Breage, in the county of Cornwall, called the Western Great Work, and onetenth

part of an adjoining tin mine called the Eastern Great Work; both these mines having

been granted by the Earl of Godolphin, as the lord and owner of the soil, to one Stephen

Pearce and his co-adventurers, under a reservation of every sixth dish of fine ore, deliverable

on the grass, as the Lord’s Dole, according to the laws and customs of the stannaries.

Mr. Millett, sensible of the uncertainty of advantages arising from this species of property,

and of the many casualties to which it is liable, appeared very anxious, upon the final

disposition of his fortune, to guard as much as possible against them; and as his son, the

respondent, for whom the bulk of that fortune was intended, was then an infant, the most

probable method which suggested itself to him of effectuating this intention, was to invest his

executors with a discretionary power of carrying on or relinquishing his mine adventures, as

time, accident, or other circumstances, should render it most for his son’s benefit.

Accordingly on the 6th of April 1750, Mr. Millett made his will, and after giving several

legacies, he thereby disposed of the residue of his estate, in the following words : viz.

“Lastly all the rest, residue and remainder of my goods and chattels both real and personal,

“rights, credits, and effects whatsoever, I do hereby give, devise, and bequeath the same unto

“my son Humphry Millett; and I do hereby make, ordain, constitute, and appoint my

30

“well-beloved wife Grace Millett, Edward Collins, John Millett and George Blewett (the

“appellant’s father) executrix and executors of my last will and testament, in trust for my said

“son Humphry Millett; and to be guardians and trustees over my said children, until they

“shall respectively attain the age of 21 years: And I do hereby will and desire, direct,

“authorize, and empower my said executrix and executors from time to time, during the

“minority of my said son Humphry Millett, to carry on and adventure my several and

“respective parts and shares of adventure, in the several tin and copper mines, in which I shall

“adventure at the time of my death, for my said son Humphry Millett, and in trust for him, or

“to discontinue the same, or such of them as they in their discretion shall think fit: And

“moreover, for them my said executrix and executors to retain, deduct, and keep, out of my

“goods and chattels, all their charges and expences in adventuring as aforesaid, or otherwise

“relating to the trust I have hereby reposed in them.”

On the 13th of June 1750, the testator died, without altering or revoking his will; at which

time the respondent was an infant of about five years old; and soon afterwards the executrix

and executors duly proved the same, and acted in the execution thereof for the respondent’s

benefit, by carrying on the testator’s shares in such mines as were deemed profitable and

advantageous, and discontinuing his shares in such as were in a contrary situation.

Among the latter sort were the two mines abovementioned, called the Western Great Work

and the Eastern Great Work; for both of them having been wrought deep, and the charges of

working and drawing the water from the bottoms becoming consequently very great, they, in

a short time after the testator’s death, became losing and unprofitable adventures.

George Blewett the appellant’s father was a co-adventurer with the testator, and several other

persons in these two mines; he having one-eighth share in the Western Great Work, and onetenth

share in the Eastern Great Work.

About two years after the testator’s death, a meeting of the several persons interested in these

two mines was held, in order to consider and determine on what was most proper to be done

concerning them; when as well on account of the very unpromising condition thereof, as

because the Lord Godolphin had by his steward insisted, that the sets of the mines, and the

right of working the same, was become forfeited according to the Stannary Laws: It was

unanimously agreed, to discontinue working the mines and surrender the sets thereof; and

some of the old partners agreed to make an application to the Lord, to consolidate both the

mines into one, and to grant a new set thereof, when so consolidated, to such of the old

adventurers, and such other persons as should be willing to become partners, upon more

beneficial terms than before; and in pursuance of this agreement, the working of the mines

was accordingly discontinued, the sets surrendered, and the materials sold for the benefit of

the partners. But many of the old partners declined any concern with the new partnership,

which was formed and consisted of some of the old partners, and some new persons. The

mines were also consolidated, and called by the name of the Great Work.

On the 1st of May 1753, a new set thereof was granted to the said George Blewett, for the

benefit of himself and the new partners therein, under the reservation of every ninth, instead

of every sixth dish of the ore, deliverable on the grass, as the Lord’s dole.

It is usual for sets of mines, or tin works in the county of Cornwall, to be granted to one of

the adventurers only; who, though he is considered as a trustee for himself and his coadventurers,

yet he never makes any assignment of, or executes any declaration of trust

31

touching the respective shares of such co-adventurers, but only enters their names and shares

in a book called the Mine Book, which is deemed a sufficient evidence of their right and

property in the mine.

Accordingly, in the month of February 1754, the names and shares of the several coadventurers

in this consolidated mine, were entered and declared in the Mine Book as

follows: viz. John Rogers, one fourth; George Blewett, one eighth; the executors of

Humphry Millett, one eighth; William Tremayne and son, one eighth; Humphry Cole, one

sixteenth; the executors of John Millett, one sixteenth; Captain John Richards, one

sixteenth; Captain Hugh Roger, five ninety-sixths; Richard Jones, one thirty-second;

Captain Samuel Lemon, one forty-eighth; John Nancarrow, one forty-eighth; and the said

John Nancarrow was then appointed manager of the mine.

At the time of this transaction, Mr. Blewett, Mrs. Millett and Mr. Collins were the only

surviving executors of the testator’s will. It did not appear that either Mrs. Millett or Mr.

Collins was consulted upon the propriety of subscribing an eighth share in this new mine for

the infant’s benefit, and therefore it was presumed that Mr. Blewett subscribed this eighth part

for the infant’s benefit conditionally, if the other two executors should think proper to

confirm the act by their approbation; and this presumption was confirmed by Mr. Blewett’s

advancing to Mr. Nancarrow several considerable sums on account of this eighth part, to the

amount of £253 and upwards, without charging the same or any part thereof to the account of

the testator’s estate, until such approbation should be obtained.

Proper measures were soon afterwards taken for improving the mine, by erecting a fireengine,

driving adits, sinking shafts, and in other necessary works, at an expense of £7000

and upwards. But it was for a long time a matter of very great doubt, whether the mine

would ever turn up sufficient quantity of tin stuff to repay such expense, and satisfy the

current charges of working it.

The apprehension of loss arising from the state of the mine, occasioned Mr. Collins and Mrs.

Millett to express their uneasiness and dissatisfaction with Mr. Blewett’s conduct, in engaging

any share of it for the infant; they being apprehensive that the expense of working the mine

being very considerable, and the probability of profit very uncertain, it could not be for the

infant’s interest to continue his concern therein any longer; but they declined being explicit

on the occasion, and would not in positive terms either assent or dissent to the continuance of

such concern.

However, as the annual period of settling the accounts of the mine approached, and as Mr.

Blewett did by no means relish the conduct of his co-executors, or the equivocal situation in

which he stood with respect to them; he thought it absolutely necessary for his own safety

that they should come to a precise determination, whether the share which he had subscribed

for the benefit of the infant should be continued or not: For this purpose Mr. Blewett in the

beginning of October 1754, wrote the following letter to Mr. Collins: “I have again

“considered of what passed between us when I last saw you, relative to the carrying on the

“late Mr. Humphry Millett’s adventures, and more particularly that of the Great Work; and

“am still of the opinion it would be for the child’s benefit to adventure therein: However, as

“you were pleased to express yourself of a different opinion, and we are very soon to settle

“the accounts relating to that mine, I desire your’s and Mrs. Millett’s final resolution in

“answer, for my government therein.” To this letter Mr. Collins on the 9th of the same month

returned the following answer: “I am so much a stranger to the state of all Mr. Millett’s

32

“adventures, both in mine and at melting-house, that it is my final resolution not to engage in

“any of them as one of his son’s trustees, and therefore utterly decline being concerned in that

“particularly which you call the Great Work.”

This letter from Mr. Collins conveying only his own negative, Mr. Blewett thought it

necessary to obtain Mrs. Millett’s direct sentiments upon the matter; and accordingly, on the

20th of the said month of October 1754, he sent Mr. Collins’s letter to her by Mr. William

Cornish his clerk, requesting her final resolution on the subject of it: And after reading that

letter, and entering into some conversation with Mr. Cornish about the condition of the mine,

and the expenses likely to be incurred in adventuring the same, Mrs. Millett desired Cornish

to acquaint Mr. Blewett that she would concur in everything relative to her son’s affairs with

Mr. Collins, and that therefore she could by no means consent to the carrying on the oneeighth

part of the said adventure called the Great Work, on her son’s account.

Mr. Blewett, in consequence of these concurring sentiments of his co-executors, thought it

incumbent on him to get rid of the said one-eighth share which he had so subscribed in the

best manner he could. And as it is never customary in mine adventurers to expose any

relinquished share to a public or open sale, but to offer it to the other co-adventurers; Mr.

Blewett at a public meeting of such co-adventurers held in December 1754, for the purpose of

auditing and settling their annual accounts, informed them of what had passed between Mr.

Collins, Mrs. Millett and himself, respecting the share which he had originally subscribed in

the name of Humphry Millett’s executors; and offered the same to such of them as would

accept it, and in case of their refusal, proposed to carry on that share for his own benefit. But

none of the co-adventurers seeming inclined to increase their respective concerns in the mine,

by taking up such relinquished share, nor in any manner objecting to Mr. Blewett’s taking it

up on his own account, his name was accordingly at such meeting, and with the unanimous

consent of every person present, entered in the Mine Book for one-fourth part of the said

adventure, consisting of the one-eighth part which he had originally taken up for himself, and

the eighth part which had been entered for the infant’s benefit, but was afterward relinquished

in the manner above mentioned. And thereupon Mr. Blewett was charged therewith, and paid

one fourth part of the costs attending the said mine, from the time of the new grant, and

which included the before mentioned sum of £243 and upwards, which he had formerly paid

on account of the testator’s estate, but had never charged the same therewith, because the

object of such charge had not been approved of by his other co-executors.

In December 1765 Mr. Blewett died intestate, leaving the appellant his only son, who soon

afterwards obtained letters of administration to him, and thereby became his personal

representative.

On the 1st of March 1766 the respondent attained his age of 21; and soon afterwards thought

it proper to file his bill in the court of Exchequer against Mrs. Millett his mother, and against

the appellant as the personal representative of his late father, charging the whole of his said

father’s conduct respecting the mine to be fraudulent; and therefore praying that the

appellant might come to an account for the profits which had been received by Mr. Blewett in

his lifetime, or by the appellant since his death, for or in respect of the said one eighth share

of the mine, from the time that such share was changed into the name of Mr. Blewett as

aforesaid; that the appellant might pay the respondent what should appear due to him upon

the balance of such account with interest; and that the appellant might procure the

respondent to be entered in the Mine Book as an adventurer for the said one eighth share of

the mine, together with all the gains and profits thereof unreceived and unaccounted for.

33

To this bill the appellant put in an answer, and thereby, after stating the several facts before

set forth, he insisted that the respondent was not entitled to any share or interest in the mine,

whereon to ground the relief prayed by his bill; and that the whole of Mr. Blewett’s conduct,

as one of the respondent’s trustees under his late father’s will, was in every respect fair and

honest, and free from the least imputation of fraud.

The cause being at issue, and several witnesses examined on both sides, came on to be heard

before the Barons of the Exchequer on the 17th of December 1772, when the court was

pleased to declare, That the respondent was entitled to an eighth share of the said mine; and

to decree the appellant to account for the profits thereof received by the said George Blewett

in his life-time, and by the appellant since his death; and it was ordered that the appellant

should do all necessary acts in order to vest the interest of such share in the respondent, and

that the respondent should pay the defendant Grace Millett her costs to be taxed, and should

have the same over again, together with his own costs, against the appellant.

The appellant apprehending himself aggrieved by this decree, appealed from it: And on his

behalf it was contended that this case did not fall within the general rule, that no trustee shall

benefit himself out of his trust estate; for here the testator invested his executors with a

discretionary power to carry on or discontinue his mine adventures as they should see proper.

This power, with respect to the share of the mine in question, was actually and deliberately

executed by the major part of the surviving executors; and the share being thus relinquished,

became free for any person to take it up who should be inclined to do so. Besides, the ground

of that relinquishment plainly shewed in what light the object of it was then considered,

namely, as an unprofitable not a beneficial interest; and that therefore it was at the

respondent’s advantage to get rid of it. Mr. Blewett in this transaction must be considered as

acting in two different capacities: As a trustee, he recommended the continuance of the share

upon motives the most disinterested and conclusive with respect to himself, because he was

thereby determined to continue his own share; and as a trustee he was controlled by the joint

negative of the other two, and the share in question was consequently relinquished and given

up. Here then an end was put to Mr. Blewett’s conduct as a trustee, quoad this part of the

respondent’s property; and in everything that happened afterwards he acted in his own

private and personal capacity. If therefore the general rule could be extended to this case, it

must of necessity follow, that if any one of the other proprietors of the mine, or indeed any

other person, had taken up this relinquished share, he would have been considered as a trustee

thereof for the respondent’s benefit; which no one would contend.

It had been, and might again be urged on the part of the respondent, that upon the

relinquishment of the share in question, Mr. Blewett ought to have sold the same in an open

and public manner, and to the best advantage: But to this it was answered, and was in

evidence of the cause, that the mine was at that time in debt to the proprietors in upwards of

£6000 and that the prospect of its ever clearing itself of this debt was then very uncertain:

The relinquished share was not therefore a marketable commodity, being loaded with a

proportionable part of so heavy a debt. And with respect to the manner in which it was

transferred, the offering it to the several co-adventurers at a public meeting, and with the

most explicit declaration of the occasion of such offer, was actually exposing it to sale in the

most open and public manner that could be, and had all the effect which could be expected

from any other mode; inasmuch as the purchaser took it cum onere, and no claim was ever

made by him upon the respondent, or his estate, for any part of the expense which had been

previously incurred upon this share. Further : By this decree, the respondent was to pay Mrs.

Millett’s costs, and to recover them over again from the appellant, whereas it did not appear

34

that she was in any shape a necessary party to the suit, having no kind of interest in the matter

in question; but, on the contrary, had been examined as a witness for the respondent: His bill

therefore, as against her, ought to have been dismissed with costs; and those costs paid by

the respondent himself.

On behalf of the respondent it was said, that nothing is better established as a general

proposition, than that where a trustee for an infant renews a lease, the renewed lease shall

enure for the benefit of the infant. This is a doctrine founded on general policy to prevent

frauds; and the known case of Rumford market, has established it as a rule of equity. The

trustees situation in respect of the estate, gives him access to the landlord; and it would be

dangerous to permit him to make use of that access for his own benefit. In this case the new

grant which was obtained, was in the nature of a renewal; it came in the place of the old

adventures, which subsisted in the time of Humphry Millett. George Blewett understood it

so, and by the indorsement on the indenture, or the entry in the Mine Book, allotted one

eighth to Millett’s executors; and in consequence thereof, payments were made by the

executors, and they were debited in their capacity of executors.

But it is objected, that the executors had power to abandon any of the adventures that should

be thought fit to be abandoned; and in that moment when great expense was likely to be

incurred, Mr. Blewett was obliged to abandon the one eighth in dispute, as executor, because

Mrs. Millett and Mr. Collins refused to concur in carrying it on. It was conceived, however,

that the facts did not warrant the objection. Mr. Collins’s letter only imported, that he was a

stranger to the matter, and could not judge what was expedient to be done, and that therefore

he could not personally engage in any of the mine adventures. But it was not from thence to

be inferred, that all were to be abandoned; and it was plain, that this was the manner in

which Mr. Blewett understood Mr. Collins’s letter; for though Mr. Collins had declared he

would not engage in any of the mine adventures, yet, with Mr. Blewett’s approbation, many

other adventures were carried on, on account of the executorship. As to what passed between

Mr. Blewett and his agents and Mrs. Millett, it appeared by her evidence, that she left it to his

discretion, to carry on or sell the share belonging to the infant; but she did not appear to have

an idea that the share was to be wholly abandoned; she only desired that he would act for her

infant son, as he meant to act for himself. If the evidence of Cornish (examined on the part

of the appellant, and to whom George Blewett gave one 48th share of the adventure) was

attended to, it did not show that Mrs. Millett determined, on a clear and full state of facts, to

abandon the adventure: Cornish stated, that before Mrs. Millett signified her dissent, some

conversation passed between him and her about the state of the mine, the prospect it afforded,

and the charges likely to be incurred in carrying it on. What the conversation was, or what

account the witness (Mr. Blewett’s messenger and favourite clerk) gave to Mrs. Millett’s

enquiries, was not stated; but if she acted upon that conversation, it might be supposed, that

Cornish represented the adventure as not worth pursuing; and though Collins’s letter was

produced to her, yet she did not appear to have been at all apprised of the contents of

Blewett’s letter to Collins. Besides Mrs. Millett resided 20 miles from the mine; but Mr.

Blewett in the neighbourhood of it. What the general opinion of the neighbourhood in respect

to the mine was, could not be unknown to him, though it probably had not travelled 20 miles;

and many witnesses proved, that so early as May 1753, more than a year before the

application to Mrs. Millett, it was the general opinion, that the mine would turn out

advantageous. But none of the witnesses said, that this opinion was carried to Mrs. Millett;

and it was no unfair intendment to suppose, that Mr. Cornish’s conversation with her (which

he had thought proper to withhold) gave her a very different state of things. And that the

mine would probably prove a beneficial adventure at the time when Mrs. Millett was applied

35

to, and when it was admitted she enquired after the prospect of things, was proved decisively

against Mr. Blewett and Cornish, by their continuing adventurers in it.

After hearing council on this appeal it was ORDERED and ADJUDGED, that the same

should be dismissed, and the decree therein complained of, affirmed.

Source: Blewett v. Millett. In Brown, Josiah. Reports of cases upon appeals and

writs of error determined in the High Court of Parliament, 1702-1779. 2nd edition,

with notes and many additional cases, brought down to the year 1800, by T. E.

Tomlins. London, J. Butterworth, 1803, vol. 7, p. 367 ff.

Publications

John Blewitt v. H. Millett. An appeal to the House of Lords concerning the conduct of the

Executors of H. Millett. 1779. 2 pts.

Source: Boase, George Clement and Courtney, William Prideaux. Bibliotheca

Cornubiensis: a catalogue of the writings, both manuscript and printed, of

Cornishmen, and of works relating to the County of Cornwall, with biographical,

memoranda and copious literary references. London, Longmans, Green, Reader and

Dyer, 1874, vol. 1 p. 360.

Blewett, John. House of Lords. Between John Blewett, Esquire, the only son and

administrator of George Blewett, gentleman, deceased, appellant, and Humphry Millet, clerk,

the son and resididuary devisee of Humphry Millett, deceased, respondent. The appellant’s

case. London, 1774. 6 p. (Heard before the House of Lords, February 1774).

Millett, Humphry. John Blewett, Esq (administrator of George Blewett, Esq, deceased, who

was one of the surviving executors in trust of Humphrey Millett, Esq, deceased, during the

minority of Humphrey Millett, Esq, his son), appellant. And the said Humphrey Millett, Esq,

respondent. The respondent’s case. London, 1774. 3, 1 p. (Heard before the House of

Lords, February 1774).

Source: English short-title catalogue (http://estc.bl.uk/)

Monument in St Hilary Churchyard

Attached to a lofty stone obelisk are the family arms and the following inscription, sculptured

in marble:–

“In memory of Humphry Millett, of Enys, Esq., who died November XVI, MDCCLXXIV;

aged XXVIII years”.

Source: Polsue, Joseph. A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall.

Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872. 4 v. Vol. 2, p. 189.

36

21. JOHN MILLETT (1748/49-1815)

John Millett was the first child of John Millett (1724-1793) and Dorcas Trevorian (about

1724-1799), who married on 15 December 1748 at St Mary’s, Truro, Cornwall. John was

born in 1748/49, and baptised on 19 March 1748/49 at Ludgvan, Cornwall. He was a miner.

He married Eliza Smith (about 1756-1836) on 20 March 1777 at Mylor, Cornwall. Between

1778 and 1796 they had 13 children. They lived at Bosavern, St Just-in-Penwith. John died

on 29 September 1815 from the effects of a fall aged 66, and was buried on 4 October 1815

at St Just-in-Penwith.

Monuments

Monuments and tablets in the Church at St Just-in-Penwith bear the following inscriptions:-

Sacred to the memory of John Millett, Esqr. of Bosavern in this parish, who died Septr. 29th,

1815; aged 65.

Also to the memory of his sons.

Edward Millett, who died at Trinidad May 24th, 1803; aged 16.

Samuel Cornish Millett, who died March 15th, 1813; aged 18.

William Smith Millett, who died April 27th, 1814; aged 32.

And John Millett, who died May 4th, 1814; aged 33.

Their remains are deposited in the family vault beneath.

His widow who survives to deplore the loss of her affectionate husband and children, erects

this monument to their memory.

Source: Polsue, Joseph. A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall,

compiled from the best authorities and corrected and improved from actual survey.

Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872. 4 v. Vol. 2, p. 292.

37

22. RICHARD OKE MILLETT (1749-1832)

Richard Oke Millett was the 1st child of Oke Millett (1718-1777) and Mary Tyacke (about

1719-1782), who married on 2 April 1746 at St Germoe, Cornwall. Richard was born on 29

March 1749 at Marazion, and baptised on 18 April 1749 at St Hilary. He resided at Penpol,

Phillack, Cornwall. Richard married first Jane Curnow (1742-1806) on 3 April 1770 at St

Clement, Cornwall; between 1771 and 1784 they had 9 children. Richard married second

Elizabeth Richards (1772-1842) on 5 September 1807 at St Hilary; they had 1 child,

Caroline (1808-1817). Richard was a surgeon. He was Captain of one Corps of the

Copperhouse Company of Volunteers, and a Partner in the Deed of 25 October 1779 in the

Cornish Copper Company (with £1,000). Richard died on 3 September 1832 aged 83, and

was buried on 8 September 1832 at Phillack.

Cornish Copper Company

Richard Oke Millett was the son-in-law of John Curnow (1697-1780). Through his wife

Jane, one of the three co-heirs of John Curnow, and by an arrangement with the other coheirs,

he was able to lease the Penpol estate and move into the ancient Penpol house, where

his presence proved to be an asset for the Cornish Copper Company in what came to be

known as the “Thirty Years War” with rival company set up by John Harvey.

Richard was always “willing and ready to contest, on CCC’s behalf, the rights which John

Harvey was claiming to the waters of the Penpol River”. In January 1795, probably on a

suggestion from John Edwards (Manager of CCC from 1765-1807), Richard “withdrew the

permission given some time previously to Harvey to make a small leat [an open watercourse

conducting water to a mill] on the edge of the Penpol wastrel to carry off the water from the

working of a Boring Mill. This was followed by a threat to fill in the leat if Harvey’s men

did not stop using it. If this threat of force were carried into effect it would result in the

Boring Mill coming to a halt. In the event Harvey did fail to act and so John Edwards sent in

his men to fill in the leat”.

In February 1795 Richard Oke Millett, Captain Henry Prideaux with about 40 men “knocked

off the stocks a lighter being built by Harveys”; Harvey complained that “the timber was put

in a place where the tide flows and this morning [25 February 1795] the sea carried off a

great many pieces which is a great loss”.

Source: Pascoe, W. H. CCC: the history of the Cornish Copper Company. Redruth,

Dyllansow Truran, Cornish Publications, 1982, p. 39, 40, 59, 62-64, 78, 159.

23. GRACE MILLETT (1750-1826)

Grace Millett was the 4th child of Humphry Millett (1723-1757) and Elizabeth Adams (about

1721-1757), who married on 20 February 1745/46 at St Just-in-Penwith, Cornwall. Grace

was born in 1750 at St Just-in-Penwith, and baptised on 7 March 1751/52 at Penzance. She

38

married Robert Davy (1746-1794) on 16 September 1776 at Madron, Cornwall; they had 6

children, including Humphry Davy (1778-1829), later Sir Humphry Davy, chemist and

inventor. Grace died on 3 September 1826 at Penzance aged 76.

Death

[Robert Davy’s] wife, whose maiden name was Grace Millett, was remarkable for the

placidity of her temper, and for the amiable and benevolent tendency of her disposition: she

had been adopted and brought up, together with her two sisters, under circumstances of

affecting interest, by Mr. John Tonkin, an eminent surgeon and apothecary in Penzance; a

person of very considerable natural endowments, and whose Socratic sayings are, to this day,

proverbial with many of the older inhabitants. ...

The parents of these children, having been attacked by a fatal feaver, expired within a few

hours of each other: the dying agonies of the surviving mother were sharpened by her

reflecting on the forlorn condition in which her children would be left; for although the

Milletts were originally aristocratic and wealthy, the property had undergone so many

subdivisions, as to have left but a very slender provision for the member of the family to

whom she had united herself.

The affecting appeal which Mrs. Millett is said to have addressed to her sympathising friend,

and medical attendant, was not made in vain: on her decease, Mr. Tonkin immediately

removed the three children to his own house, and they continued under the guardianship of

their kind benefactor, until each, in succession, found a home by marriage.

The eldest sister, Jane, was married to Henry Sampson, a respectable watchmaker at

Penzance; the youngest, Elizabeth, to her cousin, Leonard Millett of Marazion; neither of

whom had any family. The second sister, Grace, was married to Robert Davy, from which

union sprang five children, two boys and three girls, the eldest being Humphry.

Source: Paris, John Ayrton. The life of Sir Humphry Davy, Bart. LL.D. London,

Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley, 1831. 2 v. Vol. 1, p. 3-4.

24. LEONARD MILLETT (1755-1841)

Leonard Millett was the 1st child of Robert Millett (1725-1809) and Anna Tresaddern (1728-

1793), who married on 31 July 1754 at St Hilary, Cornwall. Leonard was born on 2

November 1755 at Marazion, and baptised there on 7 November 1755. He resided in

Marazion, and was Mayor of Marazion in 1797, 1801, 1807, 1813, 1817, 1822 and 1826. He

was Dutch Consul for Penzance and St Ives. Leonard married Elizabeth Millett (1754-1820)

on 27 July 1796 at Madron; they probably did not have any children. Leonard died on 15

March 1841 at Marazion aged 86, and was buried at St Hilary.

39

Children

Query issue two children: a daughter who died in Penzance of a lingering illness in 1820,

and another daughter who died in Penzance in October 1821.

Source: An account of the families of Boase or Bowes, originally residing at Paul

and Madron in Cornwall, & of other families connected with them by marriage.

Truro, Netherton and Worth for Charles William, George Clement and Frederic

Boase, 1893, col. 110.

Bequests

Leonard Millett left charitable donations to his native town. There are memorial tablets in

Marazion and St Hilary churches.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 569.

Memorial in St Hilary Church

A tomb in the Church is inscribed:

Sacred to the memory of Leonard Millett, Gent. of Marazion, who died on the 15th of March,

1841; aged 86.

His bequests for charitable uses to his native town survive as a memorial of his benevolent

and amiable disposition.

Also to the memory of Elizabeth, his wife, who died on the 19th of December, 1820; aged

66. Blessed are they who die in the Lord.

Source: Polsue, Joseph. A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall,

compiled from the best authorities and corrected and improved from actual survey.

Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872. 4 v. Vol. 2, p. 189.

25. GEORGE MILLETT (1756-1816)

George Millett was the 3rd child of George Millett (1724-1781) and Ann Sandys (1724-1806),

who married on 4 February 1751/52 at Helston, Cornwall. George was born on 15 March

1756 at Helston. He joined the Honourable East India Company’s Maritime Service, and

was a director of the H.E.I.C. He married Elizabeth Coggan (1764-1823) on 21 October

1786 at St Andrew Undershaft, Leadenhall Street, London; between 1787 and 1801 they had

8 children. In 1790 his occupation was recorded as Master Mason. George died on 17

February 1816 at Walthamstow, Essex aged 60, and was buried at Wanstead, Essex in the

Coggan vault.

40

Maritime service

Born in England, seaman King George packet three voyages Falmouth to Lisbon;

midshipman Valentine (2) 1769/70; midshipman Royal Henry 1771/2; 2nd mate Molly to

America; 4th mate London (13) 1779/80 (approved 12 November 1779, aged 24); 2nd mate

Rodney (2) 1781/2; 1st mate Rodney (2) 1784/5; captain King George (4) 1786/7; captain

Princess Amelia (3) 1789/90, 1792/3 and 1794/5.

Source: Farrington, Anthony. A biographical index of East India Company

Maritime Service officers 1600-1834. London, British Library, 1999, p. 543.

Served in the Honourable East India Company’s navy and became Commodore of their fleet;

Colonel of the 2nd Regiment of the Royal East India Volunteers, raised amongst the

employees of the H.E.I. Company in Leadenhall Street, London, England 1809.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 569.

Commander of the ship King George, in the East-India-Company’s service.

Source: The Times Issue 563, 23 October 1786, p. 3 col. C.

On Friday last Capt George Millett was sworn in by the Court of Directors of the East India

Company, as Commander of the ship Princess Amelia, burthen 808 tons, bound to Bengal;

she will be dispatched about the 30th March 1790.

Source: London Chronicle Tuesday 20 October 1789.

Yesterday a Court of Directors was held at the East India House, when the following

Gentlemen attended, and were sworn into the command of their respective ships, viz. Captain

George Millett, Hindostan, 1248 tons, consigned to China direct ...

Source: Courier and Evening Gazette (London) Thursday 31 January 1799.

Yesterday a Court of Directors was held at the East India House, when Capt. George Millett

was sworn into the command of the Indostan, destined to Madras and China.

Source: Courier and Evening Gazette (London) Thursday 27 November 1800.

41

26. MARTIN MILLETT (b. about 1756)

Martin Millett was the 5th child of John Millett (1724-1793) and Dorcas Trevorian (about

1724-1799), who married on 15 December 1748 at St Mary’s, Truro, Cornwall. Martin was

born about 1756, and baptised on 14 November 1756 at Ludgvan, Cornwall. He lived in

London. Martin married Elizabeth Bunster (b. about 1759) on 4 March 1784 at Mylor,

Cornwall; they had 5 children. Martin was buried at St Pancras (old church), London.

Possible descendants

The following were possibly descendants of Martin and his 3 sons:–

H. R. Millett in business in Camomile st. and Bishopgate st. 1801-48;

James Millett of Drum lane, Brentford 1807;

Charles Millett, attorney 19 The Terrace, Gray’s inn 1807 and his son Charles Millett,

attorney 1817;

George Millett of High st. Fulham 1840;

Edwin Millett of 4 Little Chapel st. Westminster 1843;

Henry Millett of 34 Peel st. Church lane, Kensington 1850;

John Millett of 76 Brunswick st. Blackwall 1850;

William Millett of 5 Lion st. New Kent road 1850.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 576.

27. WILLIAM MILLETT (1759-1791)

William Millett was the 6th child of George Millett (1724-1781) and Ann Sandys (1724-1806),

who married on 4 February 1751/52 at Helston, Cornwall. William was born in July 1759,

and baptised on 30 July 1759 at Helston, Cornwall. He married Elizabeth Stidiford (1757-

1838) on 7 October 1784 at St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly, where they lived. They had four

children. William died at Scilly on 25 August 1791 aged 32, shot by James Dunkin, and was

buried at St Mary’s, Penzance.

Account of death

August 25th, 1791, Mr. Thomas Hall, Surveyor of the Customs at Scilly, having received

information of a smuggling vessel, called the Friendship, of Penzance, belonging to James

Dunkin, and commanded by George Bramwell, went out in his boat in search of her, and

about ten o’clock at night fell in with her, in Old Grimsby Harbour, near the island of Tresco;

on his rowing towards the said vessel for the purpose of boarding her, a person from the deck

42

hailed and asked, “What boat is that?” and upon the said Hall’s answering, “The custom

boat”, two muskets or blunderbusses were immediately fired by the said James Dunkin into

the said boat, by which William Millett and John Oliver, two of the boatmen, in the said

custom-house boat were killed, and John Jane, another of the boatmen, dangerously

wounded. The coroner’s inquest sat on the bodies of the said William Millet and John Oliver,

and brought in their verdict Wilful Murder, against the said James Dunkin, or others, on

whom he had vast influence.

His Majesty for the better discovering and bringing to justice the persons concerned in this

most atrocious offence, was pleased to promise his most gracious pardon to any one of the

said offenders, who shall discover his accomplice, or accomplices (except the said James

Dunkin, or any other person who actually fired), so that any one or more of them may be

apprehended and convicted of the offence.

And as a further encouragement, the Commissioners of his Majesty’s Customs, in order to

bring the said offenders to justice, promise a reward of five hundred pounds to any person or

persons who shall discover and apprehend, or cause to be discovered and apprehended, the

same James Dunkin; and a reward of two hundred pounds, for the discovery and

apprehending any one or more of the other persons concerned in these murders, to be paid by

the Receiver General of his Majesty’s Customs upon conviction.

Sources:

London Gazette 20 September 1791, p. 529-530.

Troutbeck, John. Survey of the ancient and present state of the Scilly Islands…

Sherborne, Printed and sold by Goadby and Lerpiniere, 1794, p. 233-234.

28. JOHN CURNOW MILLETT (1771-1848)

John Curnow Millett was the 1st child of Richard Oke Millett (1749-1832) and Jane Curnow

(1742-1806), who married on 3 April 1770 at St Clement, Cornwall. John was born on 5

January 1771 at Penpol, Cornwall, and was baptised on 9 January 1771 at Phillack. He was

educated at Pembroke College, University of Oxford, matriculating on 2 April 1789; he

graduated B.A. in 1793. He was a clergyman. John married first Mary Thomas (1769-

1801) on 16 November 1797 at Phillack; they had 2 children, John Thomas Millett (1798-

1873) and Mary Millett (1800-1887). John married second Mary Honey (1788-1859) on 5

February 1806 at Lansallos; between 1807 and 1826 they had 10 children. John lived at

Trewen in Lannarth and Penpol, Cornwall. He was a Partner in the Deed of 1828 in the

Cornish Copper Company. John died on 13 January 1848 at Penpol aged 77.

Dissolution of partnership

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the

undersigned, Ambrose Oxley, Leonard Millett, William Millett, John Curnow Millett, Daniel

Bamfield, William Richards, William Harris, Thomas Hichens, John Budge; Francis

Edmonds, John Polkinghorne, Francis Jenkyns, William Burgess, and William Hichens,

carrying on business as Tallow-Chandlers, in the Town of Marazion, in the County of

43

Cornwall, in the name or style of the Marazion Candle Concern, hath been this day dissolved

by mutual consent. All persons having any demand on the said concern are requested to

apply to Mr. William Hichens, of Saint Ives, in the said County, Attorney at Law, who is

appointed by us to arrange and settle the affairs thereof, and to whom all debts owing to the

said concern are to be forthwith paid. — Dated the 8th day of May 1835.

Source: London Gazette 12 June 1835, p. 1128.

Trewen

Trewen, for a considerable period the seat of the family of Dandy, has long been occupied as

a farm house. Over the chief entrance were placed the initials and date T. D., 1666, B. D.

From the Rev. John Curnow Millett, the late proprietor, the estate has passed to Mrs Mary

Anne Allpress and Dr. Millett.

Source: Polsue, Joseph. A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall,

compiled from the best authorities and corrected and improved from actual survey.

Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872. 4 v. Vol. 3, p. 37.

29. GRACE MILLETT (1772-1868)

Grace Millett was the 2nd child of Humphry Millett (1744/45-1774) and Mary Sandys (1742-

1819, who married on 19 December 1765 at Helston, Cornwall. Grace was born in 1772 at

Numis, St Hilary, Cornwall, and baptised on 23 July 1772 at St Hilary. She married Charles

Short (b. about 1765) on 6 September 1790 at Madron, Cornwall; they had 6 children.

Grace died on 5 December 1868 at Brighton, Sussex aged 96.

Trevarthian

Her life was put on Trevarthian estate in St Hilary in 1781.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 574.

30. HANNIBAL CURNOW MILLETT (1776-1865)

Hannibal Curnow Millett was the 4th child of Richard Oke Millett (1749-1832) and Jane

Curnow (1742-1806), who married on 3 April 1770 at St Clement, Cornwall. Hannibal was

born on 11 November 1776 at Bodriggy, Cornwall, and baptised on 10 June 1777 at

Phillack, Cornwall. He lived in Okehampton, Devon, and between 1821 and 1844 was 10

44

times Mayor of Okehampton. He was a Partner in the 1849 Deed in the Cornish Copper

Company, and for a time was a member of the CCC Committee. Hannibal died, unmarried,

on 3 May 1865 at Okehampton aged 89.

Dissolution of partnership

Notice is hereby given, that the Copartnership lately subsisting between Richard Oke Millett,

Hannibal Curnow Millett, John Prideaux, Margaret Banfield, (as Executrix of Richard

Banfield, deceased,) William Ninnis, Roger Vivian, and Francis Rawle, in the Trades or

Businesses of a Merchant and Cooper, and carried on in Bodriggy Cellars, at Hayle, in the

Parish of Phillack, in the County of Cornwall, under the Firm of John Prideaux and Co. was

on the 25th of December 1809, dissolved by mutual Consent.—All Debts owing to and from

the said late Partnership will respectively be received and paid by John Prideaux, at Hayle.

Witness our Hands this 5th Day of October 1810.

Source: London Gazette 6 November 1810, p. 1771.

31. LEONARD MILLETT (1778-1798)

Leonard Millett was the 5th child of Richard Oke Millett (1749-1832) and Jane Curnow

(1742-1806), who married on 3 April 1770 at St Clement, Cornwall. Leonard was born on 8

September 1778 at Bodriggy, Cornwall, and was baptised on 18 September 1778 at Phillack,

Cornwall. He died, unmarried, on 5 April 1798 aged 20, being drowned off Pigeon Island,

Malabar Coast, India.

Death

The Princess Amelia, Capt. John Ramsden was burnt by accident off Pigeon Island, on the

Malabar Coast, on the 5th of April, 1798, about 40 of the crew were unfortunately lost. ...

Those drowned: Mr. L. Millett, 5th Mate ...

Source: St James’s Chronicle, or, British Evening Post (London) 21 August 1798.

Painting

The British Library holds a painting by Leonard Millett, View of Bombay Fort from the

harbour, showing St Thomas’s church, the Custom House and flag staff, with shipping in the

foreground, painted c. 1797, which has inscribed on the reverse: “Drawn by Leonard Millett

the Son of Richard Oke Millett. Penpol Hayle. Leonard Millett was blown up and killed in

the Princess Charlotte at Bombay with many others or nearly all of the crew – about 1797”.

According to the British Library note: “The Royal Charlotte was an extra ship hired by EIC

agents, along with the Isabella and Britannia, to carry gunpowder to the Cape. The

Commander of the Royal Charlotte said his insurance policy would become invalid by lading

with gunpowder and demanded Government indemnity in the event of loss. The gunpowder,

45

piled up round the main mast, was struck by lightning at Kedgeree on 8 October 1797 and all

on board, numbering more than 140 people, perished in the resulting explosion. The loss to

the EIC totalled 29,437 rupees.

Source: India Office Select Materials Record WD3867.

http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/indiaofficeselect/welcome.asp.

32. ROBERT MILLETT (1788-1844)

Robert Millett was the 2nd child of Robert Millett (1757-1819) and Mary Hockin, who

married on 7 September 1785 at Illogan, Cornwall. Robert was born on 10 March 1788 at

Marazion, and baptised there on 28 April 1788. He was a chandler. Robert married Ann

Richards (1792-1872) on 19 January 1818 at Illogan; between 1818 and 1835 they had 12

children. Robert died on 17 August 1844 aged 56, and was buried on 22 August 1844 at

Marazion.

Dissolution of partnership

Notice is hereby given, that the Partnership lately carried on at the Town of Marazion, in the

County of Cornwall, between William Cornish, Merchant, and Robert Millett, Tallow-

Chandler, both of the said Town of Marazion, under the firm of Robert Millett and Company,

Tallow-Chandlers, is this day dissolved by mutual consent.—Dated the 8th day of June 1826.

Source: London Gazette 13 June 1826, p. 1449.

33. WILLIAM MILLETT (1789-1841)

William Millett was the 3rd child of William Millett (1759-1791) and Elizabeth Stidiford

(1757-1838), who married on 7 October 1784 at St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly. William was born

about 1789, and baptised on 11 October 1789 at the Isles of Scilly. He joined the

Honourable East India Company’s Maritime Service, in which he reached the rank of

Captain. William married Mary Millett (1800-1887) on 13 December 1825 at Phillack,

Cornwall; they did not have any children. William died on 14 June 1841 at Leamington,

Warwickshire aged 52.

Maritime service

Pursar Bengal (3) 1811/12 and 1813/14, Marchioness of Ely 1815/16, 1817/18, 1819/20,

1821/2 and 1823/4.

46

Source: Farrington, Anthony. A biographical index of East India Company

Maritime Service officers 1600-1834. London, British Library, 1999, p. 543.

34. GEORGE THOMAS MILLETT (1790-1824)

George Thomas Millett was the 9th child of John Millett (1748/49-1815) and Eliza Smith

(about 1756-1836), who married on 20 March 1777 at Mylor, Cornwall. George was born

on 3 March 1790, and was baptised on 3 June 1790 at St Just-in-Penwith. He was a surgeon

in the Royal Navy. He died of palsy, unmarried, on 23 September 1824 at Bosavern, St Justin-

Penwith aged 34, and was buried at St Just-in-Penwith on 29 September 1824.

Monument

Monument in church, St Just-in-Penwith, with poetical inscription by Rev. C. V. Le Grice of

Trereife, Penzance, Cornwall.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 577.

Sacred to the memory of George Thomas Millett, Surgeon,

fifth son of John Millett, Esq. of Bosavern in this Parish,

who died Sept, 23rd 1824. Aged 34 years.

With health while glowing, sudden palsey came

To blast the vigour of his manly frame;

But faith, and hope, as Angels near his bed,

Made smooth the Pillow for his drooping head;

Taught him, with hallowing lips, the rod to kiss,

And know that sorrow is the path to bliss:

Tho’ yet in life, to feel himself in death,

And, anxious for the summons, yield his breath.

C.V.L.G.

This memorial is erected by his sisters, in testimony of their affection.

Source: Buller, John. A statistical account of the Parish of Saint Just in Penwith in

the County of Cornwall, with some notice of its ecclesiastical and druidical

antiquities. Penzance, R. D. Rodda, 1842, p. 36.

47

35. RICHARD MILLETT (1791-1828)

Richard Millett was the 10th child of John Millett (1748/49-1815) and Eliza Smith (about

1756-1836), who married on 20 March 1777 at Mylor, Cornwall. Richard was born on 6

September 1791, and baptised on 5 November 1793 at St Just-in-Penwith, Cornwall. He

served in the Royal Navy, reaching the rank of Lieutenant. On 3 August 1811 he was very

seriously wounded in an engagement in H.M.S. Raven near the island of Nordeney in the

North Sea, during the Peninsular War. Richard died, unmarried, in 1828 at Bosavern aged

37, and was buried on 18 July 1828 at St Just-in-Penwith.

Wounding

Shot through the stomach during the Spanish war, the bullet passing through him and killing

a man behind him on board H.M.S. Raven, Aug. 1811.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 577.

Account of battle

His Majesty’s Ship Quebec, Heligoland, August 6, 1811.

S I R,

I have to acquaint you with a very gallant Achievement, (the Capture of a Division of the

Enemy’s Gun-Boats,) which has been performed by Boats from this Part of your Squadron,

under the Direction of the First Lieutenant, Samuel Blyth of the Quebec, who had the Honour

to command a Party of brave Officers and Men that nobly seconded him.

The Weather was particularly fine and settled for this Kind of Service, and they had

already captured and sent to me a Vaisseau de Guerre of the Douanes Imperiales, manned

with an Officer and Twelve Men, (one of them was killed before he surrendered;) and a

Merchant Vessel which they were towing out, when being near the Island of Nordeney, on

the 3d., Four of the Enemy’s Gun-Boats were seen at Anchor within.

The Enemy silently waited the Attack, their Guns loaded with Grape and Cannister, (not

using any Round Shot,) until the Boats were within Pistol Range, when a Discharge took

place from their whole Line. The first Vessel was immediately boarded and carried, but the

other with great Bravery maintained themselves, severally, until they found their Vessels

were no longer in their own Possession.

The Loss sustained was, on our Side, Four killed and Fourteen wounded, on that of the

Enemy Two killed and Twelve wounded.

The Officers employed were ...

Midshipman Richard Millett, Raven, Very severely wounded. ...

I have the Honour to be, &c.

(Signed) CHARLES HAWTAYNE, Captain

To William Young Esq; Admiral of the White, &c. &c. &c.

48

Sources:

London Gazette 24 August 1811, p. 1669.

Gentleman’s Magazine & Historical Chronicle v. 110 pt. 2, September 1811, p. 269-

270.

Will of Richard Millett

36. CHARLES MILLETT (1792-1873)

Charles Millett was the 3rd child of George Millett (1756-1816) and Elizabeth Coggan (1764-

1823), who married on 21 October 1786 at St Andrew Undershaft, Leadenhall Street,

London. Charles was born on 17 February 1792 at Hatton Garden, London, and baptised at

Wanstead, Essex. He was educated at Hailebury College, Haileybury, Hertfordshire, and

joined the H.E.I.C. (Honourable East India Company) in China. He married Anne Crohan

(d. 1899) on 17 May 1834 at St George’s, Hanover Square, London; between 1835 and 1851

they had 12 children. They lived at Hill Place, Droxford, Hampshire and Maiden Erlegh

near Reading, Berkshire. Charles died on 28 May 1873 at 29 Queen’s Gate Terrace,

Kensington, London aged 81.

Life

Charles Millett served under the Honourable East India Company in China, and retired upon

the Charter being taken away from the China establishment. Afterwards he resided at Hill

place, Hants, and Maiden Erlegh near Reading.

49

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 570.

Papers

The letter book of Charles Millett, Supercargo at Canton, containing summaries of letters

written by him on his business and other private concerns, covering the period 1824-1827, is

held at the British Library (MSS Eur B408).

Source: India Office Select Materials Record Mss Eur B408.

http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/indiaofficeselect/welcome.asp.

37. GEORGE MILLETT (1793-1850)

George Millett was the 4th child of George Millett (1756-1816) and Elizabeth Coggan (1764-

1823), who married on 21 October 1786 at St Andrew Undershaft, Leadenhall Street,

London. George was born on 24 July 1793 at Norfolk Street, St Pancras, London, and

baptised at Wanstead, Essex. He graduated B.A. from Trinity College Cambridge in 1814,

was a Fellow of Christ’s College, and graduated M.A. in 1817. He was a clergyman,

Chaplain to the Lord Bishop of Ripon, and Vicar of Silkstone, Yorkshire, from 1845 to 1850.

He married Elizabeth Amelia Agnew (about 1795-1868) on 31 December 1818 at Cheam

Church, Surrey; between 1822 and 1831 they had 5 children. George died on 26 April 1850

at Silkstone aged 57, and was buried on 2 May 1850 at Wanstead.

Life and death

Admitted to Trinity College, University of Cambridge 26 April 1810; Matriculated

Michaelmas Term 1810; Scholar 1811; B.A. (15th Wrangler) 1814; 1st Chancellor’s Medal

1814; Fellow of Christ’s College 1814; M.A. 1817. Ordained deacon (London) 1 June

1817; priest 21 December 1817. Vicar of Silkstone, Yorkshire 1845-1850, and Chaplain to

the Bishop of Ripon. Died 29 April 1850, aged 56, at Silkstone.

Source: Cambridge University Alumni, 1261-1900.

38. JOHN BOULDERSON MILLETT (1795-1871)

John Boulderson Millett was the 2nd child of John Millett (1759-1836) and Margaret Mary

Boulderson (b. about 1763), who married on 2 January 1791 at Constantine, Cornwall. John

was born on 15 February 1795. He joined the Royal Navy, in which he reached the rank of

Captain. He resided at Falmouth, Cornwall. John married first Elizabeth Davy (1788-1830)

50

on 25 August 1817 at Madron, Cornwall; they had 3 children. John married second Anna

Maria Cole on 16 April 1832; they had 4 children. John died on 3 May 1871 at Plymouth,

Devon, aged 76.

Naval career

MILLETT. (Lieut., 1815. F-P., 19; H-P., 22)

John Millett entered the Navy, 19 Feb. 1806, as mdshipman, on board the EXPERIMENT

receiving-ship at Falmouth, Lieut-Commanders Jas. Manderson and Jas. Fagan; and in the

course of the same year, after having cruized for a short time in the GIBRALTAR 80, Capt.

Wm. Lukin, joined the MARS 74, commanded at first by the same officer, and next by

Capts. Jas. Katon, John Surman Carden, and Henry Roper. Continuing in that ship until

April, 1812, he served with a squadron under Sir Sam. Hood at the capture, off Rochefort, 25

Sept. 1806, of four heavy French frigates, two of which, the Gloire 46 and Infatigable 44,

struck to the MARS – accompanied the expedition of 1807 to Copenhagen, where,

throughout the seige, he was actively employed in command of the boats – was much

engaged in affording protection to the Baltic trade – and when at Lisbon, in 1810, was sent on

shore on detatched service at Fort St. Juliao. After a short attachment at Portsmouth to the

GOLIATH 74, Capt. Edw. Leveson Gower, he removed in June, 1812, to the COSSACK 22,

Capt. Wm. King, off Cadiz; and in Dec. of the same year he became Master’s Mate of the

ABOUKIR 74, Capts. Geo. Parker and Norborne Thompson. In that ship, in April 1814, Mr.

Millett witnessed the fall of Genoa. He took up, in May, 1815, a commission bearing date 15

Feb. in that year; was next, from 22 Jan. 1825 until May, 1827, employed in the Coast

Blockade as Supernumerary-Lieutenant of the RAMILLIES 74, Capts. Wm. M’Culloch and

Hugh Pigot; and since 24 Oct. 1840 has been in command of a station in the Coast Guard.

He married, 16 Apr. 1832, a daughter of – Cole, Esq, Purser and Paymaster R.N.

Source: O’Byrne, William R. A naval biographical dictionary: comprising the life

and services of every living officer in Her Majesty’s Navy, from the rank of Admiral of

the Fleet to that of Lieutenant, inclusive. Polstead, Suffolk, J. B. Hayward & Son,

1849, p. 761-762.

Wife

According to Collectanea Cornubiensia, Anna Maria Cole was the second wife not of John

Boulderson Millett but of his father John Millett of Truro. I think this is incorrect. Boase’s

source was W. R. O’Byrne, A naval biographical dictionary (1849), whose entry for “John

Millett” is, I believe, referring to John Boulderson Millett.

Sources:

Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and

topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro, Netherton and Worth,

1890, col. 569.

O’Byrne, William R. A naval biographical dictionary: comprising the life and

services of every living officer in Her Majesty’s Navy, from the rank of Admiral of the

Fleet to that of Lieutenant, inclusive. Polstead, Suffolk, J. B. Hayward & Son, 1849,

p. 761-762.

51

39. FREDERIC MILLETT (1798-1856)

Frederic Millett was the 7th child of George Millett (1756-1816) and Elizabeth Coggan

(1764-1823), who married on 21 October 1786 at St Andrew Undershaft, Leadenhall Street,

London. Frederic was born on 13 November 1798 at Wanstead, Essex, and baptised there on

28 January 1799. He was educated at Hailebury College, Haileybury, Hertfordshire, and

joined the Bengal Civil Service. He was a director of the East India Company. He married

Maria Wintle on 28 November 1828 at Midnapore, Bengal, India; between 1829 and 1847

they had 9 children. They lived at Woodhill near Guildford, Surrey. Frederic died on 23

July 1856 at Tayles Hill, Ewell, Surrey aged 58, and was buried on 28 July 1856 at Ewell.

Life

In 1817 qualified “with high proficiency in the Persian and Hindoostanee languages” from

the College of Fort William, an academy and training centre in Oriental Studies established

by Lord Wellesley, Governor-General of British India, in Calcutta, West Bengal, India in

1800.

Source: The Times 15 January 1818, p. 3 Col. A.

Bengal Civil Service 30 April 1816; acting magistrate of Shahabad 1819-1822; judge of

Jessore 8 March 1827, of Allahabad 7 February 1828; judge and magistrate of Beerbohm 7

February 1829, session judge of Beerbohm 1 February 1832 to 19 February 1835; secretary

to Indian law commissioners 19 February 1835 to 2 January 1837; member of council of

Governor-General of India 24 May 1843, resigned 1 December 1848 when granted annuity.

Source: Boase, Frederic. Modern English biography... Truro, Netherton and Worth,

1892-1921. Vol. 5, col. 212.

Judge of Jessore and a Junoir merchant 1828; secretary to the Indian Law Commissioners

1837; first ordinary member of the Supreme Council of India 17 April 1844; an annuitant

1848; served on the Commission for the codification of the penal laws of India; director of

the H.E.I.C. (Honourable East India Company).

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 571.

During the last rainy season, – a season, I believe, peculiarly unhealthy, – every member of

the [Law] Commission, except myself, was wholly incapacitated for exertion. ... Thus, as the

Governor-General has stated, Mr. Millett and myself have, during a considerable time,

constituted the whole effective strength of the Commission. Nor has Mr. Millett been able to

devote to the business of the Commission his whole undivided attention.

52

Source: Trevelyan, George Otto. The life and letters of Lord Macaulay. 2nd

edition. London, Longmans, Green & Co., 1877, vol. 1, p. 417. (Written 2 January

1837).

Frederic Millett, Esq. (who was employed in 1833 to revise the civil regulations of the

Bengal code, and afterwards filled the offices of secretary to the Law Commission at

Calcutta, and member of the Supreme Council of India), has been appointed secretary to the

commissioners [of the India Law Commission].

Source: The Morning Chronicle (London) Wednesday 30 November 1853.

Publications

Great Britain. Royal Commission on the Reform of the Judicial Establishments, Judical

Procedure, and Laws of India. Report of Her Majesty’s commissioners appointed to consider

the reform of the judicial establishment, judicial procedure, and laws of India, &c. London,

Eyre and Spottiswoode for HMSO, 1856. 4 v. (Parliamentary papers 1856, vol. 25)

Frederic Millett is named in this Commission but did not sign the report.

Source: Boase, George Clement and Courtney, William Prideaux. Bibliotheca

Cornubiensis: a catalogue of the writings, both manuscript and printed, of

Cornishmen, and of works relating to the County of Cornwall, with biographical,

memoranda and copious literary references. London, Longmans, Green, Reader and

Dyer, 1874, vol. 1 p. 360.

Indian Law Commission. A Penal Code prepared by the Indian Law Commissioners, and

published by command of the Governor General of India in Council. Drawn up by T. B.

Macaulay with the assistance of C. H. Cameron, J. M. Macleod, G. W. Anderson and F.

Millett. Calcutta, Bengal Military Orphan Press, 1837. 2 pts.

Indian Law Commission. Reports, dated 21 Aug. 1840 and 10 July 1841, relating to

proposed changes in the Madras judicial system. Signed: A. Amos, C. H. Cameron, F.

Millett, D. Eliott, H. Borradaile. With related papers. Calcutta, 1842. 159 p.

Indian Law Commission. Report, dated 31 Oct. 1840, on the substantive law to be applied to

all persons in the Mofussil not subject to Hindu or Muhammadan civil law. Signed: A. Amos,

C. H. Cameron, F. Millett, D. Eliott, H. Borradaile. With an additional minute by A. Amos.

Calcutta, 1840. 40 p.

Indian Law Commission. Report, dated 8 Feb. 1842, on the question of abolishing the

Recorder’s Court in the Straits. Signed: A. Amos, C. H. Cameron, F. Millett, D. Eliott, H.

Borradaile. Calcutta, 1842. 39 p.

Indian Law Commission. Report, dated 26 Feb. 1842, concerning the proposed Act to amend

the law relating to the limitation of suits. Signed: A. Amos, C. H. Cameron, F. Millett, D.

Eliott, H. Borradaile. With a draft Act. Calcutta, 1842. 13, 6 p.

53

Indian Law Commission. Report, dated 2 July 1842, on the training of civil servants

destined for the judicial branch and related questions. Signed: A. Amos, C. H. Cameron, F.

Millett, D. Eliott, H. Borradaile. Calcutta, 1842. 49 p.

Indian Law Commission. Report, dated 17 May 1843, on the reorganization of the native

judicial establishments of the three Presidencies. Signed: C. H. Cameron, F. Millett, D.

Eliott, H. Borradaile. Calcutta, 1843. 51 p.

Source: British Library Integrated Catalogue.

http://catalogue.bl.uk/F/?func=file&file_name=login-bl-list.

40. EDWARD MILLETT (1801-1821)

Edward Millett was the 8th child of George Millett (1756-1816) and Elizabeth Coggan (1764-

1823), who married on 21 October 1786 at St Andrew Undershaft, Leadenhall Street,

London. Edward was born on 29 August 1801 at Wanstead, Essex, and was baptised there.

He was educated at Hailebury College, Haileybury, Hertfordshire, and joined the Bengal

Civil Service. He died of cholera, unmarried, on 15 February 1821 at Calcutta, West Bengal,

India aged 20, and was buried at South Park Street Cemetery, Calcutta.

Death

Died of cholera morbus at Calcutta 15 February 1821 aged 20, or according to another

account was drowned whilst bathing at Calcutta 15 February 1821.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 572.

41. LOUISA MILLETT (1801-1871)

Louisa Millett was the 1st child of Richard Millett (1770-1826) and Sarah Towers (1774-

1810), who married on 1 September 1798 at St Anne’s, Limehouse, London. Louisa was born

on 18 April 1801 at Limehouse, and was baptised on 3 August 1801 at St Anne’s, Limehouse.

She died, unmarried, on 8 February 1871 at 14 Chapel Street, Penzance aged 70, and was

buried on 13 February 1871 at Madron, Cornwall.

54

Publication

Wild flowers and ferns of the Isles of Scilly observed in June and July [1853]. Transactions

of the Penzance Natural History and Antiquarian Society vol. 2, 1864, p. 75-78 (with Matilda

Millett).

Source: Boase, George Clement and Courtney, William Prideaux. Bibliotheca

Cornubiensis: a catalogue of the writings, both manuscript and printed, of

Cornishmen, and of works relating to the County of Cornwall, with biographical,

memoranda and copious literary references. London, Longmans, Green, Reader and

Dyer, 1874, vol. 1 p. 360.

42. ANN EMILY MILLETT (née Michell) (1804-1886)

Ann Emily Michell was the 6th child of Robert Michell (b. about 1770) and Ann Michell (b.

about 1765), who married on 2 July 1795 at Truro, Cornwall. Ann was born on 26 August

1804 at Truro. She married John Thomas Millett (1798-1873) on 2 August 1825 at Phillack,

Cornwall; between 1826 and 1848 they had 8 children. Ann died on 3 September 1886 at

West-End Cottage, Marazion, Cornwall aged 82, and was buried on 7 September 1886 at

Penzance.

Dissolution of partnership

NOTICE is hereby given, that tbe Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the

undersigned, Edward Michell, Ann Emily Millett, and Richard Ferris Michell, formerly

carrying on business in Old Bridge-street, and Malpas-road, in the borough of Truro, in the

county of Cornwall, as General Merchants, under the style or firm of Robert Michell and Son,

has been, and is hereby, dissolved by mutual consent, as and from the 31st day of March last.

All debts due to or owing by the said partnership will be received and paid by the said

Edward Michell and Richard Ferris Michell, at the offices situate at Malpas-road aforesaid ;

the said business will be carried on by the said Richard Ferris Michell, at Malpas-road as

hitherto, on his own account, under the style or firm of Robert Michell and Son.—Dated

Truro, this 10th day of April, 1876.

Source: London Gazette 18 April 1876, p. 2555.

43. MATILDA MILLETT (1805-1855)

Matilda Millett was the 3rd child of Richard Millett (1770-1826) and Sarah Towers (1774-

1810), who married on 1 September 1798 at St Anne’s, Limehouse, London. Matilda was

born on 18 June 1805 at Limehouse, and was baptised in November 1805 at St Anne’s,

55

Limehouse. She died, unmarried, on 3 August 1855 at 14 Chapel Street, Penzance aged 50,

and was buried in August 1855 at Madron, Cornwall.

Publications

Remarks on early British residences, and on the remains of an ancient village, near Chun

Castle [1849]. Transactions of the Penzance Natural History and Antiquarian Society v. 1,

1851, p. 286-289.

Wild flowers and ferns of the Isles of Scilly observed in June and July [1853]. Transactions

of the Penzance Natural History and Antiquarian Society vol. 2, 1864, p. 75-78 (with Louisa

Millett).

Source: Boase, George Clement and Courtney, William Prideaux. Bibliotheca

Cornubiensis: a catalogue of the writings, both manuscript and printed, of

Cornishmen, and of works relating to the County of Cornwall, with biographical,

memoranda and copious literary references. London, Longmans, Green, Reader and

Dyer, 1874, vol. 1 p. 360.

44. JOHN NICHOLAS RICHARDS MILLETT (1807-1885)

John Nicholas Richards Millett was the

3rd child of John Millett (1780-1814) and

Grace Richards Marrack Broad (1782-

1865), who married on 10 November

1804 at Madron, Cornwall. John was

born on 28 December 1807 at

Tresvenack, Paul, Cornwall, and baptised

at Paul. He was a solicitor in Penzance,

and lived at Bosavern, St Just-in-Penwith.

On 6 January 1844 he was appointed

Master Extraordinary in the High Court

of Chancery. He was Mayor of Penzance

in 1848. He married Mary Ley (about

1804-1888) on 15 May 1830 at St

George’s, Hanover Square, London;

between 1831 and 1846 they had 9

children. In 1873 John’s landholding was

recorded as being 191 acres, 1 rood, 16

perches. John died on 15 January 1885

at Penzance aged 78, and was buried at

St Mary’s, Penzance.

56

Bosavern

Bosavern was the residence of the family of that name in 1625. ... The property belongs now,

partly to J. N. R. Millett, Esq., of Penzance, and partly to Mr. Saundry, who resides there.

Mr. Millett’s part passed through the intermediate possession of the Pendarves family. Mr.

Saundry’s portion was sold, A.D. 1724, by Nicholls, of Trereife, to Thomas Allan, who

added to the house, and afterwards sold it to Mr. Saundry, the father of the present proprietor,

A.D. 1789.

Source: Buller, John. A statistical account of the Parish of Saint Just in Penwith in

the County of Cornwall, with some notice of its ecclesiastical and druidical

antiquities. Penzance, R. D. Rodda, 1842, p. 62.

Chartist

We have elected thirteen men for the Board of Highways, amongst whom are Mr John N. R.

Millet, Solicitor, whose unflinching opposition to local tyranny is well known, and whose

conduct during this contents entitles him to the thanks of every one of Labour’s sons in this

borough.

Source: Letter by P. J. O’Brien, Sub-Treasurer of the Chartist cause in Penzance,

published in the Northern Star (Leeds), 26 April 1845. Chartist Ancestors: Chartism

in Cornwall http://www.chartists.net/Cornish-Chartists.htm.

Court case

Details of the case Millett v. Millett, heard 13 May 1848, in which John Nicholas Richards

Millett was the defendant, concerning certain lands and premises in the Parish of

Tywardreath in Cornwall, is given in Adolphus, John Leycester and Ellis, Thomas Flower,

Queen’s Bench Reports, London, William Benning & Co., new series vol. 11, 1850, p. 1037-

1049.

Dissolution of company

Saturday the 2nd day of May, in the twentieth year of the reign of Her Majesty, Queen

Victoria, 1857; in the Matter of the Anglo-Cambrian Mineral Working Company, and in the

Matter of the Joint Stock Companies’ Winding-up Acts, 1848 and 1849.

UPON the petition of Charles Thomason Thompson, Charles Thomas Heneage, George Cary

Elwes, and John Brown, on the 12th day of March, 1857, preferred unto the Right

Honourable the Master of the Rolls; and upon hearing Counsel for the Petitioners, and for

John Nicholas Richards Millett, one of the contributors of the said Company, and upon

reading the said petition, an affidavit of the Petitioners annexed thereto, an affidavit of the

Petitioners Charles Thomason Thompson, Charles Thomas Heneage, and George Cary

Elwes, an affidavit of the Petitioner John Brown, and an affidavit of William John Haynes,

severally filed on the 28th day of April, 1857, the London Gazette of the 17th day of March,

1857, the Daily News and Times newspapers of the 16th day of March, 1857, respectively

containing an advertizement of the said petition, an affidavit of service on 13th day of March,

57

1857, of the said petition, at the head or only office of the said Company, on John Nicholas

Richards Millett, the Purser of the said Company, and what was alleged by the Counsel for

the Petitioners and for the said John Nicholas Richards Millett, his Honour doth order that the

said Anglo-Cambrian Mineral Working Company be absolutely dissolved and wound up, by

the Judge of this Court, to whose Court this matter is attached, under the provisions of the

Joint Stock Companies’ Winding-up Acts, 1848, and 1849. F. Milne, Registrar.

Source: London Gazette 8 May 1857, p. 1641-1642.

Publications

A notice of a carn or barrow near Penzance, recently opened by J. N. R. Millett. Report of

the Royal Institution of Cornwall 1840, p. 38-39.

Notice of pseudomorphous crystals of quartz lately found in the St. Ives Consols tin mine.

Transactions of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall v. 6, 1846, p. 77-78; Report of the

Royal Institution of Cornwall 1842, p. 27.

Reports of the Penzance Natural History and Antiquarian Society. Penzance, F. T. Vibert,

1845-1852. (The Reports for these years are signed amongst others by “J. N. R. Millett”).

Source: Boase, George Clement and Courtney, William Prideaux. Bibliotheca

Cornubiensis: a catalogue of the writings, both manuscript and printed, of

Cornishmen, and of works relating to the County of Cornwall, with biographical,

memoranda and copious literary references. London, Longmans, Green, Reader and

Dyer, 1874, vol. 1 p. 360.

45. RICHARD MILLETT (1807-1865)

Richard Millett was the 4th child of Richard Millett (1770-1826) and Sarah Towers (1774-

1810), who married on 1 September 1798 at St Anne’s, Limehouse, London. Richard was

born on 2 August 1807 at Redman’s Row, Stephenage, London, and was baptised on 1

September 1807 at St Dunstan’s, Stepney, London. He was a solicitor in Penzance, and on 2

December 1828 was appointed Master Extraordinary in the High Court of Chancery.

Richard married Anne Nicholls Harris (1821-1871) on 19 February 1839 at Madron,

Cornwall; between 1840 and 1859 they had nine children. Richard died on 4 July 1865 at

Penzance aged 58, and was buried on 8 July 1865 at Madron.

Legal career

Solicitor 1828; in partnership with Richard Richards 1833-1838; then with Walter Borlase

1838 to decease in 1865. Recorder of St Ives 18 January 1830.

58

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 578.

Salver

Richard Tracey Millett (b. 1946) of Takapuna, Auckland, New Zealand has in his possession

a brass salver inscribed as follows:

This salver was taken from the City of Sebastopol on the 10th of Sept. 1855 “the day after its

fall” by Capt. Jas. Trenwith of Mousehole and was presented by him to Mr. Richd. Millett

Penzance.

Death

A few days ago, Mr. Millett, of the firm of Millett and Borlase, solicitors, was found dead

hanging by the neck in the kitchen of an unoccupied house in Regent’s-terrace, Penzance. He

was registrar of the Penzance County Court, clerk of the peace for the borough, and deputy

coroner for the Western Division of the County of Cornwall.

Source: Liverpool Mercury Monday 10 July 1865.

46. HONEY MILLETT (1809-1847)

Honey Millett was the 2nd child of John Curnow Millett (1771-1848) and Mary Honey (1788-

1859), who married on 5 February 1806 at Lansallos, Cornwall. Honey was born on 1

September 1809 at Lansallos, and baptised there on 25 October 1809. He was Agent to

Messrs Pascoe, Grenfell & Sons, copper-merchants, and Pursar in the HEIC (Honourable

East India Company) Maritime Service. Honey married Mary Ann Turner (1815-1889) on 24

November 1834 at St Hilary; they had 6 children. Honey died of fever on 14 August 1847 at

Liverpool, Lancashire aged 38. His will was proved on 18 September 1847.

Maritime service

Midshipman Marchioness of Ely 1823/4 and 1825/6; purser Marchioness of Ely 1827/8,

Thomas Grenville 1830/1, Buckinghamshire 1832/3.

Source: Farrington, Anthony. A biographical index of East India Company

Maritime Service officers 1600-1834. London, British Library, 1999, p. 543.

59

47. NICHOLAS RICHARDS BROAD MILLETT (1809-1859)

Nicholas Richards Broad Millett was the third child of

John Millett (1780-1814) and Grace Richards Marrack

Broad (1782-1865), who married on 10 November

1804 at Madron, Cornwall. Nicholas was born on 12

August 1809 at 1 North Parade, Penzance, and was

baptised on 19 October 1810 at St Mary’s, Penzance.

Nicholas married Ann Hope Collins, only surviving

child of Christopher Collins (Lieutenant, Royal Navy)

and Catherine Dewar (1785-1854). The date of

Nicholas and Ann’s wedding is not known, but was

presumably about 1835 or 1836, as their only child

John Nicholas Millett was born on 22 November 1837

at Market Jew Street, Penzance. Nicholas died in 1859

at Brownsville, Matamoras, Mexico aged 50.

Involvement in Mexican-American War of 1846-1848

Very little is known about Nicholas Richards Broad Millett. I have so far found three

newspaper reports which refer to his involvement following the Mexican-American War of

1846-1848:

On this side of the river, Nicholas R. Millett had been somewhat conspicuous in military

efforts. He had endeavoured to get up a battalion. In this he failed. He did borrow a gun,

and on two occasions – the one late at night, and the other at midnight – fired a salute. He

was anxious to get up a military expedition to California: but in this he also failed. Millett,

it seems, did, on the night of the 15th, say that he did not want any greater force than his

body-guard, (a force of three men,) to go over and take Matamoras; and whether he took his

three men with him or not, in crossing over, is not known. He is now a prisoner in

Matamoras, and is well guarded.

Source: Liverpool Mercury Friday 27 July 1849, quoting The Brownsville Flag

(Texas) 23 June 1849.

We have by the present arrival further news from Mexico, which is of the same unsatisfactory

character as that we so constantly receive from the same quarter. Plots against the

government and counter-plots are constantly discovered, and the people are constantly kept in

a state of feverous excitement and alarm. A conspiracy had just been discovered, in which

Dr. Millett was the prime mover. He had been arrested, and Arista, the Minister of War had

60

been accused of being a party to the conspiracy. In reply Arista had written to General

Avolos desiring that the trial of Millett and his accomplices should take place without delay.

Source: Freeman’s Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin, Ireland)

Thursday 29 November 1849.

The Mexican papers state that Arista has ordered the prosecution of Dr. Millett and his

accomplices, for a conspiracy to revolt and sever Sierra Madre from Mexico.

Source: Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper (London) Sunday 2 December 1849.

The only other reference I have found is to his death:

Killed in action in a raid under Cortena at Brownsville, Matamoras, Mexico 1859.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 579.

The 1859 raid under Juan Nepomuceno Cortina at Brownsville, Matamoras, Mexico followed

the Mexican-American War of 1846-1848.

48. LEONARD MILLETT (1811-1860)

Leonard Millett was the 3rd child of John Curnow Millett (1771-1848) and Mary Honey

(1788-1859), who married on 5 February 1806 at Lansallos, Cornwall. Leonard was born

on 27 June 1811 at Lansallos, and baptised there on 18 October 1811. He joined the

Homourable East India Company’s Maritime Service. Leonard died, unmarried, on 9 March

1860 aged 50, and was buried at Phillack.

Maritime service

Midshipman Castle Huntley 1827/8 and 1829/30; 5th mate Castle Huntley 1832/3.

Source: Farrington, Anthony. A biographical index of East India Company

Maritime Service officers 1600-1834. London, British Library, 1999, p. 543.

61

49. RICHARD OKE MILLETT (1815-1897)

Richard Oke Millett was the 5th child of John Curnow Millett (1771-1848) and Mary Honey

(1788-1859), who married on 5 February 1806 at Lansallos, Cornwall, Richard was born on

28 November 1815 at Lansallos, and baptised there on 25 December 1815. He was a doctor

(M.R.C.S. Eng. 1839; M.D. King’s College, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland 1845;

L.R.C.P. Edinb. 1860). He lived at Penpoll, Cornwall. Richard married Elizabeth Ann

Davey (b. about 1842) on 14 August 1866 at Truro, Cornwall; they did not have any

children. Richard died on 1 March 1897 aged 83.

Richard Oke Millett was involved in two court-cases:

Charge of Libel

On 26 March 1850 Richard Oke Millett was charged by George Vawdrey, a fellow-surgeon

of Hayle, Cornwall, of publishing “a scandalous libel upon him”. On 29 October 1849, under

the pseudonym H. E. Edwards, Richard Oke Millett had written to the Board of Health in

London concerning medical practitioners’ behaviour during the cholera epidemic in Hayle in

the second half of 1849, and stating that “The medical men are the scorn of the

neighbourhood”. While the Court found for the plaintiff (Vawdrey), he was awarded

damages of just one shilling, and on the recommendation of the jury each party was required

to pay his own expenses. An account of the case is given in the West Briton newspaper for

29 March 1850, with the following update in the issue for 5 April 1850:

VAWDREY v. MILLETT. A correspondent states that on the return of the defendant in this

action from the Assizes, he was met about three miles on the road by a large number of the

inhabitants of Hayle and the neighbourhood, with bands and banners. After a hearty

cheering, his phaeton was unhorsed, and he was drawn into Hayle by the people. The

procession drew up in front of the White Hart, Hayle Foundry; and afterwards he was

accompanied to Penpol, where he briefly addressed the multitude, thanking them for their

generous sympathy, which would cheer him onwards in unceasing efforts for the public good.

Charge of Murder

In January 1864 Richard Oke Millett was accused by his oldest brother William John Honey

Millett and his brother-in-law Frederick Edmonds of murdering by poison his brother Jacob

Curnow Millett. However, a forensic investigation by Dr Alfred Swain Taylor of Guy’s

Hospital, London found no trace of poison, but rather than Jacob “died of an attack of serious

apoplexy supervening on chronic hydrocephalus”. Richard was therefore found innocent of

the charge. A very full account of the trial, held at Hayle, Cornwall, is given in The Western

Daily Mercury for Thursday 28 January to Monday 8 February 1864. There are also reports

in The Times 2 February 1864, p. 4 col. F, 8 February 1864, p. 6 Col. F, and 21 March 1864,

p. 10 col. F.

62

Defence of Dr Frederick Edmonds

We have been led into these reflections by the perusal of a pamphlet, entitled “Millett v

Edmonds. Explanatory Statement of the Defendant”. Our readers may have forgotten the

circumstances, which were briefly as follows :- Dr. Millett is the brother-in-law of Dr.

Edmonds, Dr. Millett and Mrs. Edmonds being brother and sister. There were several other

brothers and sisters. Amongst these was Jacob Curnow Millett, who in 1863 lived in the

house of Dr. Millett, and who, after a short illness, died, leaving his property to the Doctor. It

is no part of our intention to repeat the particulars of this unfortunate case. We only desire to

do an act of justice to Dr. Edmonds. The affairs of most families are a mystery, and properly

so, to strangers. And it is a huge pity when anything happens to violate their privacy; rarely

ever can anything be gained by submitting the quarrels of them to the judgment of the public.

We need only to say that Dr. Edmonds was not satisfied with the circumstances under which

Jacob Millett had died, and was so far suspicious as to procure the exhumation of the body

and an examination of it, after a coroner’s inquest had been held and a verdict had been

returned, “Died from natural causes.” The post mortem and negative results of the

examination by Dr. Taylor of various organs of the body went to confirm the verdict of the

jury. Dr. Edmonds does not dispute its entire justness, and admits the complete exculpation

of Dr. Millett in regard to the death of his brother or any other member of the family. In

regard to his suspicions he says, - “It is with regret that I have now felt myself compelled to

allude even to these suspicions, which I believe to have been entirely unfounded, and the

results simply of exaggerated family feeling, arising from disagreements which took

place whilst my wife and I were absent from England. I allude to the suspicions solely with

the object of showing that they did not originate with myself.”

Dr. Edmonds’ object in the pamphlet is to show that the suspicions originated with others,

and that, in so far as he acquiesced in them, he was not actuated by malice, and was not

unreasonable. We freely admit all of this. Of course, the great justification of suspicion - the

demonstration of its good foundation - is entirely wanting. But Dr. Edmonds enters into

many particulars of the deaths in the family, and of this one especially, which, in connexion

with other domestic facts, he is very anxious to have considered as sufficient justification of

his expression of suspicion. He argues from a recently notorious case in which the medical

attendant of a person being poisoned kept all his suspicions to himself, and was much

criticized for doing so. There is for Dr. Edmonds an awkward difference in these cases. In

the Pritchard case the suspicions had a foundation. In this they had none. This difference,

however, it may be argued, was only demonstrated by the expression of Dr. Edmonds’

suspicions, which led to an examination of the facts. We can only end as we began, by

remarking on the difficulty of knowing when to be suspicious. Every man must judge for

himself. And the right-minded man will have more pleasure in discovering that his

suspicions were groundless than that they were well-founded, even if he have to pay £400 for

expressing them. We believe that Dr. Edmonds has and appreciates this pleasure.

There is one other lesson to be extracted from this case, and that is in the illustration which it

affords of the inconvenience of the want of a public prosecutor. Had there been a public

prosecutor, to whom the facts of the case could have been submitted, he would have viewed

them apart from all those family feelings which gave such a false colouring to them, and in

all probability would have ascertained the simple truth of them at a far less cost to the

happiness and the purse of persons interested than has resulted from the operation of the

present law, which entrusts private individuals with the power of bringing crime to

punishment.

63

Source: Editorial “Necessity for a Public Prosecutor”. The Lancet 17 February 1866.

Inheritance

Mr. Millett, the surgeon who was in custody at Hayle on a charge of poisoning his brother,

has been discharged, the analysis of Dr. Taylor conclusively proving that no poisoning had

been administered to the deceased gentleman. The Western Mail says it was stated in Hayle

on Friday that a telegram had been [received] announcing the death of one of Mr. Millett’s

uncles, a gentleman 87 years of age, who resided at Oakhampton, by which event Dr. Millett

will come into possession of a large fortune, the deceased uncle not believing in the truth of

the allegations made against his accused nephew.

Source: North Wales Chronicle (Bangor) Saturday 13 February 1864.

The uncle was Hannibal Curnow Millett (1776-1864).

Publication

A.D. 1837, June 7. No. 7383*. Specification of R. O. Millett, of Penpoll, Hayle ...

Gentleman, for “Improvements in instruments for extracting teeth”. With drawing annexed.

London, 1837. Reprinted London, Eye & Spottiswoode, 1857. 3 p.

Source: Boase, George Clement and Courtney, William Prideaux. Bibliotheca

Cornubiensis: a catalogue of the writings, both manuscript and printed, of

Cornishmen, and of works relating to the County of Cornwall, with biographical,

memoranda and copious literary references. London, Longmans, Green, Reader and

Dyer, 1874, vol. 1 p. 360.

50. HANNIBAL CURNOW MILLETT (1818-1881)

Hannibal Curnow Millett was the 6th child of John Curnow Millett (1771-1848) and Mary

Honey (1788-1859), who married on 5 February 1806 at Lansallos, Cornwall. Hannibal was

born on 13 October 1818 at Lansallos, and baptised there on 18 July 1819. He was a

solicitor. He married first Naomi Darke (b. 1819), and second Emma Ryman in 1876. In

1873 his landholding was recorded as being 79 acres, 3 roods, 33 perches. Hannibal died

without issue on 18 June 1881 at 23 Blenheim Road, St John’s Wood, London aged 63. His

will was proved on 3 September 1881.

Occupation

Hannibal Curnow Millett and George Millett Davis carried on business as merchants at

Copperhouse under the firm of “Sandys, Vivian & Co”.

64

Source: Manuscript held Cornwall Record Office

http://crocat.cornwall.gov.uk/dserve/dserve.exe?dsqIni=Dserve.ini&dsqApp=Archive&dsqC

md=Show.tcl&dsqDb=Catalog&dsqSearch=((text)=‘towednack’)&dsqPos=534.

Edmonds v. Millett February 9, 1855

Summary

A testator gave to his son the option of purchasing an estate, at what to his trustees “should

seem a fair and reasonable value.” The trustees had a valuation made which amounted to

£1,500, the valuation made at the instance of the parties interested in the produce exceeded

that by one-third. Held, that the trustees having fixed what they considered “a fair and

reasonable value,” having authority to do so, it was incumbent on the Plaintiff to shew that it

was fraudulent, in order to prevent the son’s purchasing at £1,500.

The testator gave his real and personal estate to trustees, upon trust, as to his one-sixth share

in freehold and leasehold in Penpol, and his share and interest in the manor of Lelant and

Trevethow, “at some time within seven years after his decease,” to offer to sell and convey

the same unto his son, Hannibal Curnow Millett, “for such price or sum of money as to” his

trustees “should seem a fair and reasonable value,” if his son, Hannibal Curnow Millett,

should, within twelve months after such offer, consent to purchase the same at such price or

sum. And, in case he should refuse to purchase or neglect to accept the same, at such price

and within twelve months, as aforesaid, then the trustees were to sell and hold the produce on

certain trusts.

The testator died on the 13th of January, 1848, and the seven years would therefore expire on

the 13th of January, 1855. The Plaintiff, being interested in the purchase-money, instituted

this suit, stating that the trustees had not offered the property for sale as directed by the will,

and praying for the administration of the real and personal estate. The cause having come on

before the expiration of the seven years, it was ordered to stand over, to enable the trustees to

give to the Defendant, Hannibal Curnow Millett, the option of purchasing the property.

The trustees had a valuation made of the property, which amounted to £1,500. The valuation

on the other side amounted to £500 more.

Mr. T. C. Thompson, for the Plaintiff, asked that, as the valuations differed, another survey

might be made or an umpire appointed.

Mr. Follett and Mr. Smale, for the trustees. It is notorious that valuers never agree, but the

trustees have had a valuation made which is not impeached, and which they, in their

discretion, consider “a fair and reasonable value,” at which to offer the property to H. C.

Millett.

Mr. Roupell, for H. C. Millett, asked a delay of a year to exercise his option of purchasing.

Mr. Thompson, in reply, asked for time to impeach the valuation.

The MASTER of the ROLLS.

65

I think that if the executors have fixed what they consider “a fair and reasonable value,”

having authority to do so, it is incumbent on the Plaintiff to shew it is fraudulent. I cannot

give the Plaintiff any further opportunity to impeach it.

Declare that this is the offer which H. C. Millett is bound to accept or refuse, and direct the

usual accounts.

Source: Beavan, Charles. Reports of cases in Chancery, argued and determined in

the Rolls Court during the time of the Right Honorable Sir John Romilly, Knight,

Master of the Rolls. Vol. XX, 1854, 1855.—18 and 19 Victoria. London, Stevens &

Norton, 1856, p. 54-55.

Will

Will proved 3 September 1881 by Hannibal Curnow Millett’s nephews Walter Hale Millett of

Selby Villas, Anerley, London, England, and Henry Michell Millett of Hempton near

Fakenham, Norfolk, England.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 573.

51. HUMPHRY DAVY MILLETT (1818-1867)

Humphry Davy Millett was the 1st son of John Boulderson Millett (1795-1871) and Elizabeth

Davy (1788-1830), who married on 25 August 1817 at Madron, Cornwall. Humphry was

born on 5 July 1818 at Ludgvan, Cornwall, and was baptised there on 16 October 1818. He

graduated B.A. from Clare Hall, Cambridge in 1841. He was a clergyman, ordained in

Ireland on 22 May 1842. Humphry married first Caroline Hillier (d. 1858) on 24 June 1851

at St Mary’s Church, Reading, Berkshire; they had 4 children. Humphry married second

Katherine Elizabeth Sadler (d. 1875) in 1863; they did not have children. Humphry died on

17 August 1867 aged 49.

Life

Admitted to St John’s College, University of Cambridge, 11 April 1837; migrated to Clare,

Republic of Ireland, 11 October 1837; Matriculated Michaelmas Term 1837; B.A. 1841.

Ordained deacon 1842; priest (Cashel, Tipperary, Republic of Ireland) 17 December 1843;

curate of Lymm, Cheshire, 1847-1849; curate of Freshwater, Isle of Wight, 1851-1855.

Chaplain of the Union, Blaby, Leicester, 1856-1867. Master at the Collegiate School,

Leicester, 1858-1867.

Source: Cambridge University Alumni, 1261-1900.

66

Curate of Lymm, Cheshire, England 1847-1848; Curate of St James, Enfield, Middlesex,

England 1848-1849; Curate of Freshwater, Isle of Wight, England 1850-1854; Chaplain of

the Blaby Union, Leicester and Master in Collegiate School, Leicester, Leicestershire,

England 1854-1867.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 569.

52. CAROLINE MILLETT (1820-1821)

Caroline Millett was the 7th child of John Curnow Millett (1771-1848) and Mary Honey

(1788-1859), who married on 5 February 1806 at Lansallos, Cornwall. Caroline was born

on 26 September 1820 at Lansallos. She died on 9 February 1821 at Lansallos, and was

buried on 16 February 1821 in the north aisle of Lansallos Church aged 5 months.

Tablet in the Church at Lansallos

Caroline, daughter of the Revd. John C. (& Mary) Millett. Died at the Parsonage of

Lansallos 19th Febry. 1821; aged 6 months.

Source: Polsue, Joseph. A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall,

compiled from the best authorities and corrected and improved from actual survey.

Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872. 4 v. Vol. 3, p. 39.

53. CECELIA MILLETT (née Panormo) (b. 1823)

Cecelia Panormo was the daughter of Louis Panormo (1784-1862). Cecelia was born on 1

March 1823 in London. She married John George Mudge Millett (1825-1865) on 18 March

1852 at St Peter’s Church, Melbourne; between 1853 and 1865 they had 8 children. After

John’s death she married Thomas Turner (d. 1896) on 21 January 1869 at Papakura,

Auckland.; they had one child, Emily Turner (b. 4 November 1869).

Financial position

The stranding of the cutter Petrel has been the means of reducing to straightened

circumstances the wife and family of the late owner, Mr. Millet. Mr. Millet died only a week

before the wreck of the vessel, which thus added care to the grief of the family. We

understand that the matter has been taken up by some benevolent ladies at Onehunga, and

that a subscription will be set on foot to relieve their immediate wants, and which we hope

will meet with every success.

67

Source: Daily Southern Cross (Auckland) 8 April 1865, p. 4.

Call for assistance

Mrs. Millett, to whose bereavement and loss the public papers recently called attention, has

been deprived of her husband, her eldest daughter, and of the means of supporting herself and

seven children, by the destruction of the cutter Petrel, on the Western coast of this island,

within the brief space of about one month.

We have testified to these circumstances that our fellow townsmen and others may

confidently, as we trust they will heartily, aid by pecuniary contributions, or in other ways, to

mitigate such unusual and severe infliction. A. G. Purchas, G. Brown, J. Wallis, R. Laishley.

Contributions for Mrs. Millett will be received at the Auckland Bank, Onehunga, or at either

of the undermentioned stores:– Mr. S. Dailty Fleming’s, Mrs. Shepherd’s, Captain

Christey’s, Mr. J. Davies’s, and Messrs. Fleming and Stephenson’s.

Source: Advertisement, Daily Southern Cross (Auckland) 4 May 1865, p. 1 (via

PapersPast, http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

54. LEONARD MILLETT (1823-1881)

Leonard Millett was the 4th child of Robert Millett (1788-1844) and Ann Richards (1792-

1872), who married on 19 January 1818 at Illogan, Cornwall. Leonard was born on 15

February 1823 at Marazion, and baptised there on 6 March 1823. He was a sadler and

ironmonger. He resided at Marazion, and was a member of the Marazion Town Council. He

married Mary Jacka; they did not have any children. Leonard died on 6 March 1881 at

Marazion aged 58, and was buried there on 11 March 1881.

Coin collection

Leonard Millett’s uncle Leonard Millett, Dutch consul, left him a fine collection of coins.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 568.

68

55. JANET MILLETT (née Webster)

Janet Webster was the 2nd daughter of Joseph Webster. She married Edward Millett (1824-

1876) on 31 March 1853 at Tor Mohum Church, Devon; they did not have any children.

Publication

An Australian parsonage; or, the settler and the savage in Western Australia. London, E.

Stanford, 1872. xvi, 415 p.

Source: Boase, George Clement and Courtney, William Prideaux. Bibliotheca

Cornubiensis: a catalogue of the writings, both manuscript and printed, of

Cornishmen, and of works relating to the County of Cornwall, with biographical,

memoranda and copious literary references. London, Longmans, Green, Reader and

Dyer, 1874, vol. 1 p. 360.

Reviewed in Pall Mall Gazette (London) Monday 19 February 1872.

56. JOHN GEORGE MUDGE MILLETT (1825-1865)

John George Mudge Millett was the 3rd child of John Boulderson Millett (1795-1871) and

Elizabeth Davy (1788-1830), who married on 25 August 1817 at Madron, Cornwall. John

was born on 5 September 1825 at Sandwich, Kent, and was baptised in October 1825 at St

Clements, Sandwich. His occupation was mariner. John married Cecelia Panormo (b. 1823)

on 18 March 1852 at St Peter’s Church, Melbourne; between 1853 and 1865 they had 8

children. John died on 18 March 1865 at Onehunga, Auckland aged 42, and was buried at St

Peter’s Church cemetery, Church Street, Onehunga.

Life and death

John George Mudge Millett joined the Royal Navy at an early age, passing his examinations

in 1845 at the age of 20. He served as Assistant Master to HMS Victory from 29 August to 5

September 1845, and on 6 September 1845 was transferred as Assistant Master to HMS

Kingfisher – a ten gun sloop of war based at Kabenda (Cabinda) near the Congo estuary,

which was doing duty on the West African coast in suppressing the slave trade across the

Atlantic, chasing pirates and running down ships suspected of carrying contraband. In June

1847 he was transferred to HMS Philomel, and on 2 September 1848 he rejoined HMS

Victory at Portsmouth. Because of sickness, probably resulting from his service on the West

African station, he was invalided from the Navy, and decided to try his fortune in Australia.

He left Plymouth on the barque Tory on 21 April 1850, arriving in Melbourne on 2 August

1850. During the voyage he met and fell in love with Cecelia Panormo, a passenger en route

to Melbourne to take up a position as governess to a family on an outback sheep station.

John was able to obtain work on the same station, and the two were married on 18 March

69

1852 in St Peter’s Church, Melbourne. They worked on the sheep station until early 1860

when, at the invitation of Cecelia’s eldest sister Matilda, who with the Panormo family had

settled at Orua near Auckland, John and Cecelia, together with their five children, caught a

sailing ship from Melbourne to Auckland, then travelled on a little sailing cutter down the

Manukau to Orua.

John first worked in the Panormo timber mill, but then decided to build a small schooner

suitable for trading along the coast. He wrote to his Aunt Harriet, a sister of Sir Humphry

Davy, for financial assistance, and received £200 towards the cost. The little schooner Petrel

was launched in 1864, the same year that the Milletts moved from Orua to Onehunga, and

was first used to carry timber from Panormo’s mill in Orua to Onehunga. On 12 March 1865

the Petrel was to take a miscellaneous cargo from Onehunga to Raglan. Unfortunately on the

eve of sailing John became ill, and a Dutch seaman named Captain Beck was found to take

command of the ship, accompanied by John’s eldest son Maurice, then aged 12, as one of the

crew. The cargo was discharged successfully at Raglan, but on the return voyage a storm

blew up, and the captain was eventually forced to beach the ship between Manukau Heads

and Muriwai on 18 March 1865 [*] – both ship and cargo a total loss, although no lives were

lost. On that same day John died in Onehunga, the anniversary date of his wedding just 13

years before, leaving his wife Cecelia a widow with eight young children to support, at a time

when there was no social security benefits or insurance to assist.

After a short time Cecelia moved with her family (one child died within a month of her

father’s death) from Onehunga back to Orua to be with her sister Matilda (Mattie). The

family were often short of food, and a sawyer named Thomas Turner, then working in

Panormo’s bush, helped them in any way he could. On 21 January 1869, just over three years

after John Millett’s death, Cecelia Millett and Thomas Turner were married.

Source: Coulthard, Eric. Orua saga: an historical story of pioneering ancestors and

beautiful surroundings. Waiuku, J. E. Coulthard, 1963, p. 53-68.

* Note: The Petrel was actually stranded on Tuesday 28 March 1865, not Saturday 18

March (the date of J. G. M. Millett’s death). See the Daily Southern Cross (Auckland)

Monday 3 April 1865 p. 4 for an account of the stranding, and Tuesday 11 April 1865 p. 4 for

an account of the attempt at salvage.

Launch of cutter

The launch of a cutter called the Petrel took place most successfully at Awhitu, near the

Manakau Heads, on Tuesday last, at noon, before a large number of spectators. The vessel is

of 30 tons burthen, and was built by Messrs. Millet and Panormo.

Source: Daily Southern Cross (Auckland) 4 November 1864, p. 4.

70

57. RICHARD OKE MILLETT (1827-1897)

Richard Oke Millett was the 2nd child of John Thomas Millett (1798-1873) and Ann Emily

Michell (1804-1886), who married on 2 August 1825 at Phillack, Cornwall. Richard was

born on 19 September 1827 at Copperhouse, Hayle, Cornwall, and baptised on 27 October

1827 at Gwinear, Cornwall. He was educated at Penzance Grammar School, Penzance.

Richard married Barbara Packman Cutler (b. 1827) on 1 January 1852 at Ewell, Surrey;

they had 4 children. Richard died on 1 March 1897 aged 70, and was buried on 4 March

1897 at St Just-in-Penwith, Cornwall.

Charge of larceny

EXTRAORDINARY CHARGE OF LARCENY

Mr. R. O. Millett was charged, on Monday morning, at the Court of the Resident Magistrate,

with the offence of larceny. The defendant, who has been acting in the capacity of Sheriff’s

officer, lately received a writ to execute against the goods of Michael Bourke, at the same

time receiving instructions to bring the goods to Auckland, unless inconvenient to do so, in

which case he was empowered to sell them there. The articles levied upon were a quantity of

posts and rails, which the defendant left on Manakau beach, and a few head of poultry, which

he brought on to Auckland, and which he sold to a relative of his own, then on a visit to his

house. The amount realised was twelve shillings, which was duely accounted for to the

Sheriff. In the meantime, Mr. Bourke, not seeing the fowls advertised, went to the

defendant’s house and demanded them. Delivery being refused, he gave the defendant into

the custody of the police on the present charge. The Resident Magistrate, after hearing the

evidence, of which we are able to give only an outline, immediately discharged the defendant

– remarking that the utmost he had committed was imprudence, there not being the shadow of

a charge of larceny against him. He left the Court without any imputation upon his character.

Source: Daily Southern Cross (Auckland) 7 March 1856, p. 3 (via PapersPast,

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

Same person?

An “R. O. Millett” was presented to the Governor in the Legislative Council Chamber in

Auckland on Tuesday 4 September 1855.

Source: Daily Southern Cross (Auckland) Tuesday 11 September 1855, p. 2 (via

PapersPast, http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

A “Richard Oke Millett, Nelson Street, Clerk” is listed in an Auckland, New Zealand jury list

for 1856-7.

Source: Daily Southern Cross (Auckland) 5 February 1856, p. 4 (via PapersPast,

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

71

58. JOHN CURNOW MILLETT (1828-1870)

John Curnow Millett was the 3rd child of John Thomas Millett (1798-1873) and Ann Emily

Michell (1804-1886), who married on 2 August 1825 at Phillack, Cornwall. John was born

on 20 September 1828 at Copperhouse, Hayle, Cornwall. He was educated at Penzance

Grammar School, Penzance. He worked for H.M. Customs, Penzance and Gloucester. John

married Emily Vincent Vivian (1841-1927) on 1 January 1861 at Roseworthy, Gwinear,

Cornwall; they had 5 children. John died on 24 November 1870 at Gloucester aged 42.

Appointment

Vacancies, appointments, and promotions in the Civil Service. Customs: Mr. John C.

Millett, searcher and tide-surveyor at Penzance, has been promoted to be junior landingwaiter

at Gloucester.

Source: Daily News (London) Saturday 21 January 1860.

59. ARTHUR HILL MILLETT (1831-1879)

Arthur Hill Millett was the 5th child of George Millett (1793-1850) and Elizabeth Amelia

Agnew (about 1795-1868), who married on 31 December 1818 at Cheam Church, Surrey.

Arthur was born on 12 May 1831 at Brighton, Sussex. He was educated at Rugby School;

obtained his commission as ensign on 11 December 1847; served in the Punjaub Campaign

during the Anglo-Sikh War 1848-1849, for which he received a medal; was second in

command of the 11th Punjaub Infantry at the Siege of Mooltan September 1848 to January

1849; and fought in the Battle of Chillianwallah 13 January 1849. He obtained his

commission as lieutenant in the 69th Regiment Bengal Native Infantry on 17 November 1852;

became captain on 18 February 1861, major on 11 December 1867, lieutenant-colonel on 11

December 1873, and colonel on retired full pay on 9 June 1877. For many years he was

Inspector-General of Police, Hyderabad assigned districts, India. He married Elizabeth

Watson. He died without issue on Monday 8 December 1879 at 5, Duke Street, Portland

Place, Marylebone, London aged 48.

Military career

Ensign 11 December 1847. In Punjaub Campaign during the Anglo-Sikh War 1848-1849.

Second in command of the 11th Punjaub Infantry at the Siege of Mooltan September 1848 to

January 1849; in the Battle of Chillianwallah 13 January 1849. 69th Regiment Bengal

Native Infantry: Lieutenant 17 November 1852; Captain 18 February 1861; Major 11

December 1867; Lieutenant-Colonel 11 December 1873; Colonel on retired full pay 9 June

1877.

72

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 571.

Battle at Kurwania Sota, Oude

The following is Lieutenant Arthur Hill Millett’s account of a battle at Kurwania Sota, Oude

in May 1859, when he was just 28 years old:

Lieutenant A. H. Millett, Commanding 2nd Jezailchees, to Major J. L. Vaughan,

Commanding Field Column, Sidhonia Ghaut.

Camp Sidhonia Ghaut,

Banks of the Raptee, Oude, May 14, 1859.

Sir,

I have the honour to forward the subjoined report of the operations carried out yesterday

against the rebels in the Kurwania Sota by the force under my command.

Agreeably with your orders, based upon information brought to you during the night, I

proceeded early yesterday morning to Khulkulla (twelve miles), and thence moved, with the

detachments marginally noted *, to Khoodawah (distance six miles), on the left bank of the

Raptee.

As I reached Khoodawah from the westward, Lieutenant Stewart, Adjutant of 5th Punjaub

Infantry, with a force as per margin #, joined me by the direct road from this camp.

The junction having been thus happily effected at 7.30 A.M., and it being probable that the

rebel force was still in the place where the spy had seen it on the 12th instant, I determined

upon advancing at once to the attack.

The enemy were reported to consist of 50 cavalry and from 400 to 500 sepoys, all under

the command of collector Khooda Buksh Khan +, and were said to be encamped in the bed of

the Kurwania Sota, immediately under the hills which separate the Sonar Valley from the

plains of the Raptee.

The distance from Khoodawah to the Kurwania Sota is six miles, the path leading the

entire way through dense jungle.

We advanced in the order given in the margin §, having a small advanced guard and

flanking parties from the 5th Punjaub Infantry.

After advancing half a mile through the jungle, we met 12 rebel sowars, who at once

turned and fled towards the Kurwania Sota. The advanced guard fired, but without killing

any of the rebels.

It being evident that the sowars whom we had just seen would give the alarm to the enemy,

and it being most necessary that I should obtain early information as to the movements of the

rebels, I ordered up half the cavalry from the rear, and sent them ahead under Native

Commandant Meer Jaffir Khan, of the 2nd Jezailchees, with orders, however, to the latter not

to commit himself in any unequal fight with the enemy.

When we had arrived within two miles of the Kurwania Sota, one of our sowars brought

back a report from Meer Jaffir Khan, urging the rapid advance of the infantry, and stating that

the enemy had fallen in to the sound of the bugle, and appeared inclined to show fight.

Continuing our advance as rapidly as possible, we soon reached our advanced cavalry; and

looking over an intervening rise in the ground, I perceived a body of rebels collected in a flat

basin of the Sota, to the number of fully 400 men.

73

Allowing a few moments for the enemy to collect, under cover of the rising ground I

detached 20 men of the 9th Company 5th Punjaub Infantry, to the right, and as many to the

left, to crown the hills on either side of our advance, so as to prevent any small bodies of the

enemy from getting round our flanks.

The 8th Company 5th Punjaub Infantry, and No. 10 Company 2nd Jezailchees, were

ordered to move steadily forward in reserve, whilst I attacked with No. 9 Company of the

Punjaub Infantry, and No. 9 Company of the Jezailchees.

These preliminary arrangements were speedily effected, and we at once moved over the

brow of the rise to the attack.

The enemy gave us a heavy volley of musketry as we showed ourselves over the

intervening rise; and then, not liking the confident rush nor the wild joyous shouts of our

men, they commenced a rapid retreat, but at first in good order, towards Sonar.

The pursuit was at once pressed with all speed, and many of the rebels soon sought

protection in the intricate nullahs to the right and left. They were, however, everywhere

followed up by parties of our infantry and destroyed in all directions. In one small ravine on

the right no less than 21 rebels were killed. At the same time the central pursuit was carried

on with unremitting vigour, all ranks vying with each other to overtake the flying enemy. On

this central path alone, I counted 44 dead rebels, and the slaughter was also heavy on our left.

After continuing the pursuit for three miles over most difficult ground, I found that the

enemy was utterly dispersed; and, as the heat and their exertions were telling on our men,

and we were going farther and farther from water, I stopped the pursuit. You will be glad to

know that our loss consisted of but 1 man killed and 2 wounded, whilst I can safely put down

the enemy’s loss at certainly over 80, and the general impression is that 100 would be nearer

the mark.

After giving the men a short rest in the Kurwania Sota, I marched back to Khoodawah,

where the men ate their dinners.

From Khoodawah we proceeded to Bhojpoor (3 and a half miles) where the column

separated, the Police Cavalry and the Jezailchees returning to Khulkulla, and the Punjaub

Cavalry and Infantry coming to this camp, which they reached at 9 P.M.

The gallantry and exertions of all under my command merit my warmest thanks, and I am

especially indebted to Lieutenant Stewart for the great assistance which he rendered to me

throughout the day.

All behaved admirably, and I cannot, without injustice to the rest, particularize the forward

gallantry of individuals.

During the day the troops from Khulkulla marched 35 miles, and those from the camp 48

miles, and much of this under a more than usually hot sun.

I may here mention that the rebels killed were all either officers or sepoys, and that they

were all armed (i.e., the sepoys) with percussion muskets.

Amongst the slain are 2 sabadars, 1 jemadar, and 2 “Captain sahebs.”

I have this morning heard that those rebels who escaped from yesterday’s fight have fled

beyond Sonar into Dang, and I conceive that they are not likely to give us any more trouble in

this direction.

I have, &c.,

A. H. MILLETT, Lieutenant,

Commanding 2nd Jezailchees.

* 16 sabres of the 14th Oude Police Cavalry, and 160 of the 2nd Regiment Jezailchees.

# 26 sabres of 1st Punjaub Cavalry, and 120 of 5th Punjaub Infantry (Rifles).

74

+ Assisted by General Shere Khan.

§ 120 of 5th Punjaub Infantry; 160 of 2nd Jezailchees; 26 of 1st Punjaub Cavalry; 16 of 4th

Oude Police Cavalry.

Source: London Gazette 2 September 1859, p. 3278.

The operations on the Nepaul Frontier do not seem to be either active or attended by any

satisfactory results. A spirited little engagement took place on the 13th May, on the Karonla

Seta Pass, Nepaul. Two companies of the 5th Punjaub Rifles, under Lieutenant Stewart, were

sent out from Major Vaughan’s camp at Sidhonia Ghat at three a.m., on the 13th, and were

joined by two companies of the 2nd Jezailehee Regiment, and a few cavalry under Captain

Millett, at a place fourteen miles from camp, whence the force marched to a gorge in the hills

where they surprised a body of rebels about 400 in number. The surprise was complete, and

after a volley of about 40 paces, they took to flight, and were shot down as they climbed the

steep hills in their rear, up which they were pursued 3 miles. Positive information has been

received since, of the death of General Bukht Khan in this engagement.

Source: Taranaki Herald 17 September 1859, p. 1 (from the Melbourne Herald 9

August 1859) via PapersPast (http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz.

Appointment

Captain A. H. Millett is appointed to be inspector-general of police in the Hyderabad

assigned districts.

Source: The Times Saturday 27 April 1867, p. 5 col. F.

Obituary

Colonel Arthur Hill Millett, late of the Bengal Staff Corps, for many years Inspector-General

of Police, Hyderabad assigned districts, India, and formerly of the 69th Regiment of Bengal

Native Infantry and second in command of the 11th Punjab Infantry at Mooltan, died at 5,

Duke-street, Portland-place, on Monday last, in his 49th year. He obtained his commission as

ensign December 11, 1847, and served in the Punjab campaign of 1848 and 1849, for which

he received a medal. He obtained his commission as lieutenant November 17, 1852; became

captain February 18, 1861, major December 11, 1867, lieutenant-colonel December 11, 1873,

and colonel on retired full pay June 9, 1877.

Source: The Times Thursday 11 December 1879, page 6 col. 5.

75

60. FORTESCUE WILLIAM MILLETT (1833-1915)

Fortescue William Millett was the 2nd child of Fortescue Millett (1811-1852) and Johanna

Teague (1812-1871), who married on 20 August 1832 at Redruth, St Uny, Cornwall.

Fortescue was born on 20 August 1833 at Marazion, Cornwall, and baptised there on 24

November 1833. By occupation he was a civil engineer, but he had a strong interest in the

sciences, specialising in the foraminifera (single-celled marine animals enclosed by a thin

shell). In 1865 he was a Member of the Queckett Microscopical Club, and in 1880 was made

a Fellow of the Royal Microscopical Society of London. Fortescue lived in Marazion. He

died, unmarried, on 8 February 1915 aged 82.

Scientific names

Fortescue William Millett, 1833-1915, who - at least partially - lived in London, where he

was a founding member of the Quekett Club, published on Malayan foraminiferans during

the last decade of the 19:th and the first decade of the 20:th century and is honoured in the

foraminiferan names Rosalina millettii Wright, 1911 and Textularia milletti Cushman, 1911.

His name has also been used for 3 new foraminiferal genera: Millettia Schubert (1911),

Millettiana Banner, Pereira & Desai (1985), and Millettella Rhumbler (1904) (but now

regarded as a testate amoeba). The name milletii has been used for species, subspecies and

varieties no fewer than 33 times, whilst Millett himself erected 55 species and varieties of

foraminifera during his life. A paper “The life and works of Fortescue William Millett

(1833-1915), foraminiferologist” has recently been submitted to the Journal of

Micropalaeontology by Dr Whittaker’s colleague Richard L. Hodgkinson.

76

Source: Biographical Etymology of Marine Organism Names.

http://www.tmbl.gu.se/libdb/taxon/personetymol/petymol.m.html.

Obituary

Mr. F. W. Millett, chiefly known to geologists for his work on the Foraminifera of the St.

Erth Clays, was a man of few friends, in whom he confided as an active worker on the more

recent forms. His main results were a series of papers on the Foraminifera of the Malay

Archipelago (Journ. Roy. Micro. Soc., 1898-1905) and on the Galway shores in conjunction

with Mr. F. P. Balkwill (Journ. Micro. & Nat. Sci., iii, 1884). Millett was a great linguist,

was deeply versed in the West of England dialects, and was a remarkably well-informed man.

But he was a recluse, made few friends beyond his local circle, and was but rarely seen in

London of late years. He had a wide and thorough knowledge of his special subject and its

literature, but publication was a labour, and much of the work he did died with him. He was

82.

Source: Sherborn, C. D. Fortescue William Millett. Geological Magazine series 6

vol. 2, June 1915, p. 288.

Publications by Fortescue William Millett

1884: The foraminifera of Galway. Journal of Microscopy and Natural Science vol. 3, 1884,

p. 19-28, 78-90 (with F. P. Balkwill)

1885: Notes on the fossil foraminifera of the St. Erth clay pits. Transactions of the Royal

Geological Society of Cornwall vol. 10, 1885, p. 212-216.

1885: The recent foraminifera of Mounts Bay. Report and Transactions of the Penzance

Natural History and Antiquarian Society 1885, p. 26-28.

1886: Additional notes on the foraminifera of the St. Erth clay. Transactions of the Royal

Geological Society of Cornwall vol. 10, 1886, p. 223-226.

1887: On the abraiding action of a stone kept in motion by a current of water. Transactions

of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall vol. 10, 1887, p. 227-228.

1892: The foraminifera of a post-tertiary deposit in Sussex. In Bell, A. Notes on a posttertiary

deposit in Sussex. Report of the Yorkshire Philosophical Society 1892, p. 65-66.

1894: The foraminifera of the Pliocene beds of St. Erth. Transactions of the Royal

Geological Society of Cornwall vol. 11, 1894, p. 655-661.

1896: The foraminifera of the Pliocene beds of St. Erth in relation to those of other deposits.

Transactions of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall vol. 12, 1896, p. 43-46.

1896: Report on the recent foraminifera of the Malay Archipelago. Journal of the Royal

Microscopical Society, London 1896, p. 258-269.

77

1898: Additions to the list of the foraminifera from the St. Erth clay. Transactions of the

Royal Geological Society of Cornwall vol. 12, 1898, p. 174-176.

1898: Report on the recent foraminifera from the Malay Archipelago. Journal of the Royal

Microscopical Society, London 1898 p. 499-513, 607-614; 1899 p. 357-365, 557-564; 1900

p. 539-549; 1901 p. 1-11, 485-497, 619-628; 1902 p. 253-275, 509-528; 1903 p. 685-704;

1904 p. 489-506, 597-609.

1902: Note on the faujasinae of the tertiary beds of St. Erth. Transactions of the Royal

Geological Society of Cornwall vol. 12, 1902, p. 719-721.

1905: List of foraminifera from the Pliocene marl of Myrtou. In Bellamy, C. V. & Jukes-

Brown, A. J. The geology of Cyprus. Plymouth, William Brendon & Son Ltd, 1905,

Appendix 3, p. 71-72.

1908: The recent foraminifera of Galway. Notes on a report by F. P. Balkwill and F. W.

Millett. Published in the year 1884, together with corrections, and a reproduction of the

illustrations taken from the original drawings. Plymouth, William Brendon & Sons Ltd,

1908. 8 p.

1970: Report on the recent foraminifera of the Malay Archipelago. Lochem, Netherlands,

Antiquariaat Junk, 1970. 248 p. (Reprinted from Journal of the Royal Microscopical

Society, London 1896-1904).

Publications about Fortescue William Millett

Anon. Fortescue William Millett F.G.S., F.R.M.S. Journal of the Queckett Microscopical

Club ser. 2 vol. 12, April 1915, p. 559-560 (obituary).

Anon. The late Mr F. W. Millett of Brixham. Brixham Guardian 11 February 1915

(obituary).

Heron-Allen, Edward. The Genus Karamosphaera Brady. With some notes upon a lost

paper by the late Fortescue William Millett, F.R.M.S., on the foraminifera of the shore sands

of Misaki, Japan. Journal of the Royal Microscopical Society, London vol. 56, 1936, p. 113-

119.

Hodgkinson, Richard Lloyd. My friend Fortescue William Millett, the last of the “Great

Foraminiferologists”. Heron-Allen Society 5th Annual Symposium, London, 2 July 2005.

Opusculum vol. 8, 2005, p. 45-55.

Hodgkinson, Richard Lloyd. The life and works of Fortescue William Millett (1833-1915),

foraminiferologist. Journal of Micropalaentology vol. 25 no. 2, 2006, p. 165-174.

Sherborn, C. D. Fortescue William Millett. Geological Magazine series 6 vol. 2, June 1915,

p. 288 (obituary).

78

61. HUGH LEY MILLETT (1833-1879)

Hugh Ley Millett was the 3rd child of John

Nicholas Richards Millett (1807-1885) and Mary

Ley (about 1804-1888), who married on 15 May

1830 at St George’s, Hanover Square, London.

Hugh was born on 7 October 1833 at Penzance,

Cornwall. He served in the Army in India,

including throughout the Indian Mutiny (1857-

1859), reaching the rank of Colonel, 5th Punjaub

Cavalry. He married Julia Maria Woodthorp

Childs on 18 October 1866 at St Stephen’s,

Coleman Street, London; they had one child, the

London actress Ethel Maude Millett (1867-1920).

Hugh died on 11 July 1879 at Victoria Parade and

Napier Street, Fitzroy, Melbourne, Australia aged

46, and was buried on 13 July 1879 in the

Melbourne Cemetery.

Military service

Second Lieutenant 28th Bengal Native Infantry 20 January 1852; Lieutenant 1856; Captain

1857; Brevet Major 22 December 1866. Served throughout Indian Mutiny 1857-1859 and

was present in very many important engagements. Despatched on command with a squadron

of 5th Punjaub Cavalry in Hazara during the Umbeyla Campaign of 1863. Lieutenant-

Colonel 1866.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 580.

Action at Bulleh, Punjab

My men had been about half-an-hour in the saddle when the guns I had sent for arrived,

under the command of Lieutenant Martineau, 10th Native Infantry, accompanied by some

fifty men of the Puttiala Rajah’s Infantry. The guns I immediately pushed to the front, and

with them attacked the principal entrance of the town, whilst I at the same time sent a troop,

under Lieutenant H. L. Millett, my Adjutant, to cut off the retreat of those who had extended

themselves along the canal on my left flank. This service was well performed. The troops

dashed across the canal, near the town, and then charged the insurgents, whose retreat they

had thus cut off. The latter were obliged to take to the open country, and they were pursued,

for at least four miles, with great slaughter. ...

79

The loss of the insurgents cannot be estimated at less than 130 or 140, and of these, I should

say, some 70 or 80 were cut up by the troop under Lieutenant Millett. I cannot speak too

highly of the conduct of the 1st Punjaub Cavalry, on both occasions, when engaged. The

Artillery also did good service, and my thanks are particularly due to Lieutenant H. L.

Millett, 1st Punjaub Cavalry; Lieutenant Martineau, 10th Native Infantry ; and Dr. J. E.

Tuson, 1st Punjaub Cavalry, for the great assistance they rendered me.

Lieutenant W. T. Hughes, Commanding 1st Punjaub Cavalry, to the Adjutant-General of

the Army, Head-Quarters, Camp before Delhi. Camp, Bulleh, 16 July 1857.

Source: Supplement to the London Gazette 16 January 1858, p. 241.

Action near Musha, Oude

Captain Hugh Ley Millett, commanding Detachment 1st Punjab Cavalry, to Lieutenant A. B.

Temple, Staff Officer, with Major Ramsay’s force.

Camp, Musha, April 4, 1859.

SIR, I have the honour to report, for the information of Major Ramsay, commanding, that,

agreeably to instructions I received from you, I proceeded yesterday in advance of the

Kumaon Battalion, with detachments 1st Punjab Cavalry and Oude Military Police (as per

margin)* at a sharp pace, to endeavour to intercept a body of rebels (reported to be 500

Cavalry and 1500 Infantry) who had left the jungle at the foot of the hills, and were

threatening (and as was afterwards ascertained by me, had attacked) the Thanna of

Chowradee.

On arriving within three or four miles of the Thanna, my advanced skirmishers suddenly

came upon a body of the rebel cavalry (their outlying picquet) to whom we immediately gave

chase; they, and an infantry picquet which joined them, retiring as precipitately as possible

on their main body in the vicinity of the jungle. The skirmishers, under Duffadar Sufdur

Khan, 2nd Troop, 1st Punjab Cavalry, closed in, and charged them in the most gallant

manner; the odds being about seven to one. The gallantry of Duffadar Sufdur Khan, and

Lance Duffadar Kummeroodeen Khan, 2nd Troop, 1st Punjab Cavalry, was most

conspicuous. I myself saw them engage four men (cavalry), all of whom they killed ; but I

regret that Lance Duffadar Kummeroodeen Khan received a severe sabre wound on his left

temple, and, had it not been for the gallantry displayed by Duffadar Sufdur Khan, he would

have been killed.

Fourteen of the enemy were left dead on the field ; and the detachment had four men and

four horses wounded (as per accompanying return.)

I continued the pursuit at the gallop, until brought up suddenly by a nuddee with very steep

banks. Being now close on the main body of the rebels, who held a position on the opposite

bank, we sustained for a short time a very heavy fire from musketry and rifles. My advance

being thus checked, I retired with a view of drawing the enemy out into the open country,

where I could again charge them with effect. In this I was disappointed, as they clung to the

jungle. Being unable to act further, I immediately despatched a request that the infantry

might be brought up, as quickly as possible, to dislodge them.

My thanks are due to Lieutenant A. F. Danvers, 1st Punjab Cavalry, who accompanied the

detachment, and showed his usual zeal, and also to Lieutenant W. L. P. Drummond, of the

Oude Military Police, for the able assistance rendered by himself and his men ; one of whom

slew four of the enemy with his own hand.

The Thanna of Chowradee held its own against the rebels ; and the Sikh Police, who

fought from within its walls, killed thirteen of the enemy.

80

I regret to add that, owing to the severity of the pace maintained throughout, two horses of

my detachment died from exhaustion, and a few were lamed.

Enclosed I beg to forward a numerical casualty return of the detachment under my

command.

I have, &c.,

HUGH LEY MILLETT, Captain,

Commanding Detachment, 1st Punjab Cavalry.

* 1st Punjab Cavalry.—2 European officers, 108 sabres.

Oude Military Police.—1 European officer, 22 sabres.

Source: London Gazette 14 July 1859, p. 2742.

62. PHILIP RICHARDS MILLETT (1834-1871)

Philip Richards Millett was the 11th child of Robert Millett (1788-1844) and Ann Richards

(1792-1872), who married on 19 January 1818 at Illogan, Cornwall. Philip was born on 6

March 1834 at Marazion, Cornwall, and baptised there on 1 August 1834. He resided at

Penzance. He was a mariner. Philip married Sarah Ann Curnow (about 1836-1873) on 24

July 1860 at Madron; they had 2 children, Frederic and Louisa. Philip died on 9 September

1871 at Penzance aged 37, and was buried on 14 September 1871.

Apprenticeship

Born Marazion. Apprentice aged 16. Present ship OREGON of Penzance. Joined 30

November 1848 (indentured at Penzance).

Source: Seamen’s crewlists, 1851: men on vessels registered in the ports of

Cornwall. Compiled by Liz Hore. Family History Indexes, 2002. (CD-ROM).

63. JAMES HALSE MILLETT (1835-1890)

James Halse Millett was the 4th child of John Nicholas

Richards Millett (1807-1885) and Mary Ley (about

1804-1888), who married on 15 May 1830 at St

George’s, Hanover Square, London. James was born

on 25 April 1835 at Bosavern, St Just-in-Penwith,

Cornwall. He served in the P&O Line between 1852

and 1861, when he fell into Southampton dry dock.

James married Harriet Carnell (1845-1923) on 28

March 1862 at St James’s, Westminster, London;

between 1862 and 1875 they had eight children. In

the 1871 UK Census they are recorded as living at

Pear Tree Park, Hound, Woolston, Hampshire. James

81

and Harriet emigrated to New Zealand about 1880 and to Australia about 1884. James died

on 7 July 1890 at 78 Charlotte Street, London aged 55, and was buried at Marylebone

Cemetery, London.

Death of brother William Halse Millett

Letter to Emma from James Millett – 24/10/1877

3 Ausnell Villas

Ausnell Place

Finsbury Park

London

24/10/77

My dearest Emma,

The distressing intelligence received by the Mail via San Francisco arrived here on

the 13th September from Edwin of the death of our poor William and confirmed by the

following Mail Via Suez from Johnny has indeed truly overwhelmed us. I was for some time

in great hopes that the report might turn out to be unfounded on account of Edwin only

having heard of it on board the Pacific Mail Steamer at Auckland but Johnny’s letter and the

batch of newspapers have dispelled all such – poor dear Fellow I can scarcely credit even

now that he has been so cruelly taken from us thru the gross neglect and inefficiency of the

Life boat Committee. Now that it is too late I see they are making all sorts of alterations as

also the Harbour Authorities in more full enforcing the Board of Trade Regulations as to the

loading of vessels – It is a cruel and bitter blow for you, my dear Emma & my fervent prayer

is that our Heavenly Father may so temper the anguish caused you by this fearful calamity

that you may in time be able to look at it with calmness & the reflection that the dear

departed one is only gone a little before. Johnny in his letter says that a wreath has been left.

This I am indeed glad to know so you can now write home and give instructions concerning

the remainder of his legacy under Emily Millett’s Will. You are of course aware that under

my Grandmother’s Will he is entitled to the sum of about £640 at the death of my Aunt Grace

– this, with that also coming to the Representatives of my Brother John will be a nice

amount. I was very glad to hear that Johnny had been so fortunate in obtaining an

appointment in the London Chartered Bank at Sydney, this, under the present distressing

circumstances, must be a great relief for you to know that he is provided for – My great

anxiety however is on your own account and that of Emma and Lilo. I truly shall be glad to

hear that something has been done in Sydney to alleviate as much as possible from your hard

lot. Willingly most willingly by would -------------and my mite, but situated as I am with

eight children around me & having scarcely sufficient to keep them alive, it is impossible to

do so. My salary from Rickett & Smith only 2 Pounds per week and having been out of

employment so many trying months it will take some considerable time before I can clear

myself of debt. I have been very careful in giving you my full address as I shall be truly glad

to hear from you at any time when you can spare a few moments & also Johnny and Emma.

With my sincerest best love to you all.

Believe me

Your affect. Brother

Jas H Millett

P.S. Our dear Father and Mother are in sore distress, fortunately I was in Cornwall when the

letter came. I think was a source of great comfort to them.

Source: Brian Richard Antill Millett.

82

Inheritance

James Halse Millett took title to all non-Bosavern property on the death of his father in 1885.

Bosavern went to his younger brother Edwin Ley Millett.

Source: Millett, Iain. Millett of Penpol and Marazion.

http://www.iain.millett.btinternet.co.uk/millett_Story.htm.

Court case

The civil business at the Supreme Court was commenced yesterday at 11 a.m., and the Court

adjourned twelve minutes later. A case, James Halse Millet v. John Russell, claim £240 (the

parties to which belong to Ashburton) was called, but the plaintiff was not prepared to go on,

and offering no good grounds for an adjournment, was compelled to accept a nonsuit. Mr

White appeared for him to apply for an adjournment, and Mr T. G. Russell for defendant to

oppose it. There being no other case set down for that day nothing more could be done and

the Court adjourned till 10.30 this morning.

Source: Timaru Herald 13 December 1888, p. 2.

Dissolution of partnership

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the

undersigned, James Halse Millett and Sydney Sheath, carrying on business as Bamboo

Furniture Manufacturers, at 15, Warren-mews, Warren-street, Tobtenham-court-road, under

the style or firm of Millett and Co., has been dissolved, by mutual consent, as and from the

6th day of June, 1890. All debts due to and owing by the said late firm will be received and

paid by the said James Halse Millett.—Dated 6th day of June, 1890.

JAS. H. MILLETT.

SYDNEY SHEATH.

Source: London Gazette 13 June 1890, p. 3321.

64. EDWIN LEY MILLETT (1836-1902)

Edwin Ley Millett was the 5th child of John Nicholas Richards Millett (1807-1885) and Mary

Ley (about 1804-1888), who married on 15 May 1830 at St George’s, Hanover Square,

London. Edwin was born on 10 October 1836. He married Blanch Collingwood (b. 1838)

on 24 October 1866 at Rhyle, Flintshire, Wales; they had 6 children. Edwin moved to New

Zealand, and in August 1869 became a director of the Golden Crown Gold Mining Company

in Puriri, Thames; for 2 months in 1874 he was Collector for Waiotahi District Board in

Grahamstown, Thames. His occupation was recorded in the 1881 U.K. Census as master

mariner. He succeeded to Bosavern on the death of his father on 15 January 1885. Edwin

died on 29 December 1902 at Penzance, Cornwall aged 66, and was buried at St Just-in-

Penwith.

83

Waiotahi District Board

Edwin L. Millett appointed Collector for Waiotahi District Board, Grahamstown, Thames, 24

April 1874. Resigned June 1874.

Source: Superintendent General Inwards Correspondence. Archives New Zealand

Auckland Office agency AP series 2 Item 18 records 1376/74 and 2070/74.

Retrieval of body

The Thames Advertiser publishes the following extract of a letter from Mr. E. L. Millett, of

Tararu, to his wife there, respecting the removal of the body of the late Miss Porch. The

letter is dated Port Waikato, 5th instant. The extract is as follows:– “You will probably hear

that Captain Waite, of the Wild Duck, and I on our return from Mercer the other day fell in

with, and took into our boat, the body of that poor girl that was drowned, which accident I

mentioned to you in my letter before last. As you may hear many garbled reports of the

transactions I will give you the true one. We left Mercer about 7.30 a.m., and told people if

we saw the body we would pick it up, hardly thinking that we should do so; about ten miles

or thereabouts from Mercer we saw the body floating, caught in a snag. We went to her;

touch her I could not, but having my rugs in the boat (as usual) I took one end, Waite the

other, passed it under her body, and, with both our hats off reverentially, took her body on

board, covering her naked body with my other rug. We then made for the Tuakau Landing,

where I went on shore to find some one to take charge of the body; after waiting over two

hours, and no one coming, we left for this place with body, arriving about 5 p.m., and moored

the boat off in the stream. About three hours after we arrived a boat or canoe came down

demanding the body, which we gave up; and as the next day (January 1st) it blew a hurricane

nearly, we made a coffin, put the body in, and started it back the next morning (2nd).”

Source: The Daily Southern Cross (Auckland) vol. 31 no. 5426, 13 January 1875, p.

2 (via PapersPast, http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz)

Inheritance

Edwin Ley Millett took title to Bosavern on the death of his father in 1885. All non-

Bosavern property went to his older brother James Halse Millett.

Source: Millett, Iain. Millett of Penpol and Marazion.

http://www.iain.millett.btinternet.co.uk/millett_Story.htm.

65. SYDNEY CROHAN MILLETT (1836-1879)

Sydney Crohan Millett was the 2nd child of Charles Millett (1792-1873) and Anne Crohan (d.

1899), who married on 17 May 1834 at St George’s, Hanover Square, London. Sydney was

born on 29 September 1836 at Bramdean House, Hampshire, and was baptised on 12

December 1836 at Bramdean. He was educated at Winchester College. He served in the

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Army, reaching the rank of Colonel in the 23rd Regiment of Foot, Royal Welsh Fusiliers.

Sydney married Fanny Wells Ingram on 17 October 1876 at St Mary Abbotts, Kensington,

London; they did not have any children. He died from the effects of sun-stroke on 3 August

1879 at Gibraltar aged 43.

Military career

Ensign 23rd Welsh Fusiliers 16 June 1854; Lieutenant 21 September 1854; Captain 30

November 1855; Major 1 September 1869. Present at the Crimean War battles of Alma (20

September 1854) and Inkerman (5 November 1854); severely wounded in the attack on the

redan (fort) at Sebastopol, Crimea 8 September 1855. Also present throughout the Ashantee

Campaign (1873-1874) in West Africa; as a major in command of the 2 Battalion Royal

Welsh Fusiliers he commanded the support ordered by Sir Garnet Wolseley to come up and

cover the retreat from Coomassie. Brevet Colonel.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 570.

The screw steam transport Robert Lowe, No. 134, arrived at Spithead this morning from the

Crimea, having on board 193 non-commissioned officers and men, 16 sailors, and some

commissariat drivers, invalided and wounded men. The troops are from various cavalry,

artillery, and foot regiments. About 90 of them are from Balaklava direct, having received

their wounds at the last attack on the Redan; some of these cases are very bad, including

many losses of limbs, &c. Both invalids and wounded are all, however, doing well. ... The

following have had a passage home in the Robert Lowe: ... Lieutenants Millett, Conner, and

Tupper, 23d Fusiliers ... all wounded at the Redan.

Source: Daily News (London) Monday 12 November 1855.

On the 15th of January [1874], a picked hundred [of the 23d Welsh Fusiliers], under Colonel

Mostyn ... started for the front and were in for the taking and burning of King Coffee’s town.

A week later, this party, esteemed so fortunate by their comrades, were followed by 200

more, commanded by Major Millett .... These 200 Fusiliers only got within 30 miles of

Coomassie, but performed the most important service of securing Sir Garnet Wolseley’s

communications at a critical time ....

Source: The Times Friday 20 March 1874, p. 12 col. C.

This reference is to the Ashanti War of 1873-1874, in which British, Colonial and allied

native forces deployed against the army of the Ashanti King Koffee Kalkalli, which was

threatening the British Gold Coast Protectorate.

85

Obituary

Colonel Sydney Crohan Millett, of the 23rd Royal Welsh Fusiliers, died at Gibraltar of

sunstroke on the 3d inst., in his 43d year. He obtained his commission as ensign in 1854, and

served with the 23d Fusiliers in the Eastern Campaign of 1854-55, including the battles of

Alma and Inkerman, siege and fall of Sebastopol; and was severely wounded at the attack on

the Redan on the 8th of September. He was rewarded for his services with the medal with

three clasps, the Sardinian and Turkish medals, and the 5th class of the Medjidie. He became

Captain in 1855, and Major in 1869, and subsequently embarked for the Gold Coast with the

2d Battalion of the 23d Fusiliers, and served in the second phase of the Ashantee War in

1874, for which he received the medal, with clasp, and the brevet of Lieutenant-Colonel.

Source: The Times 7 August 1879, p. 11 col. C.

Publication

All at C, or The Captive, the Coffee, and the Cocoatina: an original modern musical melodrama,

written at sea, by Major Millett and Lieutenant Wilcox. London, S. French, 1873. 18

p. (French’s acting edition of plays, v. 102).

66. JOHN NICHOLAS MILLETT (1837-1918)

John Nicholas Millett was the son of Nicholas Richards Broad Millett (1809-1859) and Ann

Hope Collins. John was born on 22 November 1837 at Market Jew Street, Penzance,

Cornwall. He served in the Royal Navy. He married Maria Tyson (1842-1920) on 11 April

1868 at Durban, Natal, South Africa. Between 1871 and 1887 they had 14 children. John

died on 22 November 1918 at Lelant, Cornwall aged 81.

Life

Served in the Crimea 1853-1854, Crimean medal, Sevastapol bar and Turkish medal;

travelled in South Africa 1858-1865; in Madagascar 1865-1868; came to reside at Venayr,

Lelant, Cornwall February 1878; introduced into Cornwall the Burkbank potatoe 25

February 1884.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 579.

86

67. CHARLES FREDERIC MILLETT (b. 1838)

Charles Frederic Millett was the 4th child of Charles Millett (1792-1873) and Anne Crohan

(d. 1899), who married on 17 May 1834 at St George’s, Hanover Square, London. Charles

was born on 30 November 1838 at Hill Place, Droxford, Hampshire, and baptised at

Droxford. He was educated at Eton College, Eton, Berkshire, matriculated 7 July 1831, and

graduated B.A. 1860 and M.A. 1878 from Christ Church College, University of Oxford. He

was a solicitor in London, and member of the Oxford and Cambridge and Athenaeum Clubs.

He lived at Cornwall Gardens, South Kensington, London. Charles married Elizabeth Alice

Harcourt (b. about 1860) on 11 February 1891; they had 3 children.

Legal career

Called to the bar at Inner Temple 26 January 1864, left it in 1869. Admitted a solicitor 1873;

a member of the firm of Gedge, Kirby and Millett, 1 Old Palace Yard, Westminster, London,

England.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 570.

Dissolution of partnerships

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between the undersigned,

Sydney Gedge, Alfred Octavius Kirby, Charles Frederic Millett and Sydney Morse, as

Solicitors, at No. 1, Old Palace-yard, in the city of Westminster, and 5, Lime-street-square, in

the city of London, under the style or firm of Gedge, Kirby, Millett, and Morse, has been

dissolved, by mutual consent, as far as regards the said Sydney Morse, who retires from the

firm, as and from the 1st July, 1888. And that all outstanding partnership debts will be

received and all outstanding partnership liabilities defrayed by the said Sydney Gedge, Alfred

Octavius Kirby, and Charles Frederic Millett, who will in future carry on business on their

own account, at No. 1, Old Palace-yard aforesaid, under the style or firm of Gedge, Kirby,

and Millett ; the said Sydney Morse will in future carry on business on his own account, at 5,

Lime-street-square aforesaid..—Dated, the 4th day of July, 1883.

Sydney Gedge. C. F. Millett.

Alfred O. Kirby. Sydney Morse.

Source: London Gazette 6 July 1883, p. 3448.

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the

undersigned, Sydney Gedge, Alfred Octavius Kirby, Charles Frederic Millett, Leslie Lathom

Gedge, and Hugh Hippisley Ayscough-Ayscough, carrying on business as Solicitors, at No.

11, Great George-street, in the city of Westminster, under the style or firm of “GEDGE,

KIRBY, AND MILLETT,” has been dissolved by mutual consent, as and from the thirty-first

day of December, 1903, and that the said Sydney Gedge and Leslie Lathom Gedge will

continue to carry on business as Solicitors, at No. 11, Great George-street aforesaid, under the

87

style or firm of “Gedge and Gedge,” and that the said Alfred Octavius Kirby, Charles

Frederic Millett, and Hugh Hippisley Ayscough-Ayscough will continue to carry on business

as Solicitors also, at No. 11, Great George-street aforesaid, under the style or firm of “Kirby,

Millett, and Ayscough.”—Dated this first day of January, 1904.

Source: London Gazette 5 January 1904 p. 136.

Winding-up of company

In the High Court of Justice.—Companies (Winding-up).

Mr. Justice Wright. No. 00275 of 1899.

In the Matter of the Companies Acts 1862 to 1893 and in the Matter of the Properties

Development Limited.

NOTICE is hereby given that a petition for the winding up of the above named Company by

the High Court of Justice was on the 2nd day of August 1899 presented to the said Court by

Sydney Gedge Alfred Octavius Kirby and Charles Frederic Millett all of 11 Great Georgestreet

in the city of Westminster Solicitors Co-partners carrying on business under the style or

firm of Gedge Kirby and Millett as creditors of the above named Company. And that the said

petition is directed to be heard before the Court sitting at the Royal Courts of Justice Strand

London on Wednesday the 25th day of October 1899 and any creditor or contributory of the

said Company desirous to support or oppose the making of an Order on the said petition may

appear at the time of hearing by himself or his Counsel for that purpose and a copy of the

petition will be furnished to any creditor or contributory of the said Company requiring the

same by the undersigned on payment of the regulated charge for the same.

GEDGE, KIRBY, and MILLETT, 11, Great George street, Westminster, Solicitors, the

Petitioners.

Source: London Gazette 11 August 1899 p. 5056.

68. MONTAGUE MILLETT (1839-1901)

Montague Millett was the 5th child of Charles Millett (1792-1873) and Anne Crohan (d.

1899), who married on 17 May 1834 at St George’s, Hanover Square, London. Montague

was born on 4 December 1839 at Hill Place, Droxford, Hampshire, and baptised on 14

March 1840 at Droxford. Educated at Rugby School, he joined the Honourable East India

Company Service in 1857, reaching the rank of Major General in the 43rd Regiment of the

Bengal Native Infantry. He lived at Dhurmsala, Himachal Pradesh, India. Montague retired

in 1893, and died, unmarried, on 27 February 1901 at Mooltan, Punjab, India aged 62. In

his will he left £18,500.

Military career

Joined the Honourable East India Company Service in 1857. Served with the 42nd

Highlanders at the relief of Lucknow during the Indian Mutiny (First War of Indian

88

Independence) in 1857. Barrack Master in the North West Provinces of British India.

District Superintendent of Police 2nd grade. Ensign 43rd Regiment of Bengal Native

Infantry 18 May 1858; Lieutenant 22 October 1858; Captain 6 March 1868; Major 5

October 1874; Lieutenant Colonel 31 October 1875.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 570.

Appointments

Appointed Colonel 31 October 1887.

Appointed Major-General 1 January 1893.

Source: London Gazette 13 January 1888, p. 360, and 20 January 1893, p. 333.

Game of chess

The game of chess played with living chessmen, which was a favourite amusement in the

Middle Ages, has, according to the Pioneer, been revived by Lord Lytton, who when recently

at Mooltan tried the experiment with Colonel Millett. The chess board consisted of a carpet

of alternate red and white calico squares a yard wide placed on the ground, and the pieces

were men and boys, dressed in appropriate red and white costumes, who stood on the squares

and moved at the word of command. Lord Lytton, it is said, won an easy victory. He did

not, however, follow the example of a certain Emperor of Morocco, who, when playing with

living chessmen, used to cut off the heads of the captured pieces.

Source: The Graphic: an illustrated weekly newspaper 13 January 1877, p. 31.

Monument

Monument on grave at Multan: “Sacred to the memory of Montague Millett third son of the

late Charles Millett H.E.I.C.S. Major General Bengal Infantry. Born 4 December 1839.

Died 27 February 1901. He served throughout the Indian Mutiny. Present at several

engagements and the capture of Lucknow.”

Source: Officers died. http://glosters.tripod.com/offzdiedm.htm.

69. CECIL GEORGE MILLETT (1840-1865)

Cecil George Millett was the 6th child of Charles Millett (1792-1873) and Anne Crohan (d.

1899), who married on 17 May 1834 at St George’s, Hanover Square, London. Cecil was

born on 11 December 1840 at Hill Place, Droxford, Hampshire, and baptised on 1 April

1841 at Droxford. He was educated at Sandhurst School, Sandhurst, Berkshire, and joined

89

the Bengal Native Infantry. He died, unmarried, on 4 February 1865 at Bhutan aged 24, and

was buried at Patlakhowa Cemetery, West Bengal, India.

Death

Killed in action during the Duar War (November 1864-April 1865) between British India and

Bhutan when Quartermaster and Lieutenant of 11th Regiment of Bengal Native Infantry.

Source: Millett, George Bown. Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished), p. 106.

An account of the Duar engagement by its Calcutta correspondent is given in The Times

Thursday 16 March 1865, p. 10 col. A.

Memorial panel

A memorial panel at Christ Church, Royal Military College, Sandhurst reads:

CHINA 1857. BHOTAN 1865. NEW ZEALAND 1863-64-65.

To the Glory of God and in Memory of ...

Lieut. C. G. Millett, 11th Bengal N. I.

Source: Mockler-Ferryman, Augustus Ferryman. Annals of Sandhurst: a chronicle

of the Royal Military College from its foundation to the present day, with a sketch of

the history of the Staff College. London, Heinemann, 1900, p. 78.

70. RICHARD TRACEY MILLETT (1840-1875)

Richard Tracey Millett was the 1st child of Richard Millett (1807-1865) and Anne Nicholls

Harris (1821-1871), who married on 19 February 1839 at Madron, Cornwall. Richard was

born on 5 June 1840 at Penzance, Cornwall, and baptised on 14 August 1840 at St Mary’s,

Penzance. He served in the Royal Artillery. He died, unmarried, on 28 April 1875 on board

the P. and O. steamship Hydaspes, near Port Said, Egypt, on his way home from Bombay,

India aged 35.

Military Service

Embarcation of troops for British America

The Royal mail steamship Arabia sailed from Liverpool, on Saturday, for New York,

diverging en voyage to Halifax, to land troops. Besides the usual mails, she took out 70 cabin

passengers, including 20 military officers. Among these latter were ... Lieutenant R. T.

Millet. ... These officers took out under their command 14 non-commissioned officers and

220 men of the 2d and 3d brigades of garrison Royal Artillery. ..."

90

Source: The Times 7 January 1862, p. 7.

Leave of absence

The following officers of the Royal Artillery in India have been granted leave of absence

from date of departure to England to appear before a Medical Board:- Capt. R. T. Millet, No.

4 Battery, 5th Brigade ...

Source: The Times 6 February 1872, p. 3; 1 October 1872, p. 3.

Death

Captain Richard Tracy Millett, of the Royal Artillery, died at sea on board the Hydaspes, on

passage home, April 28, near Port Said, aged 35. He entered the service Dec. 1859; and

became Capt. June 1872.

Source: Colburn’s United Service Magazine and Naval and Military Journal 1875,

part ii, page 256.

Publications

Additions to the Cornish ferns [1854]. Transactions of the Penzance Natural History and

Antiquarian Society v. 2, 1864, p. 233.

Catalogue of land and fresh water shells found in St Mary’s, Scilly [1852]. Transactions of

the Penzance Natural History and Antiquarian Society v. 2, 1864, p. 108-109.

List of fungi of the neighbourhood of Penzance [1852]. Transactions of the Penzance

Natural History and Antiquarian Society v. 2, 1864, p. 91-94.

Source: Boase, George Clement and Courtney, William Prideaux. Bibliotheca

Cornubiensis: a catalogue of the writings, both manuscript and printed, of

Cornishmen, and of works relating to the County of Cornwall, with biographical,

memoranda and copious literary references. London, Longmans, Green, Reader and

Dyer, 1874, vol. 1 p. 360.

71. ROBERT EDWARD MICHELL MILLETT (1840-1907)

Robert Edward Michell Millett was the 6th child of John Thomas Millett (1798-1873) and Ann

Emily Michell (1804-1886), who married on 2 August 1825 at Phillack, Cornwall. Robert

was born on 2 June 1840 at Penzance. He resided at Marazion. He was a merchant. In

1873 his land-holding was recorded as 88 acres, 2 roods, 29 perches. Robert married first

Sarah Oxley Michell (1839-1902) on 16 September 1863 at Marazion; they did not have any

children. Robert married second Emily Hill (d. 1934) on 26 November 1902 at Padstow,

91

Cornwall; they had one child, John Carminowe Millett (b. 9 June 1904). Robert died on 5

June 1907 at Marazion aged 67.

Appointments

Vacancies, appointments, and promotions in the Civil Service. War-office: Mr. R. E. M.

Millett has been apointed to a temporary clerkship, and passed his examination.

Source: Daily News (London) Saturday 14 January 1860.

Appointed to be Second Lieutenant, 12th Cornwall Artillery Volunteer Corps, 10 July 1867.

Source: London Gazette 30 August 1867, p. 4866.

Promoted to First Lieutenant, 12th Cornwall Artillery Volunteer Corps, 28 September 1867.

Source: Edinburgh Gazette 29 November 1867, p. 1414.

Resigned from 12th Cornwall Artillery Volunteer Corps, 5 April 1870.

Source: Milne, Benjamin Arthur. Historical Record of the 1st Cornwall, Duke of

Cornwall’s, Artillery Volunteers. London, Army & Navy Co-operative Society, 1885,

p. 159.

72. WILLIAM HALSE MILLETT (1840-1877)

William Halse Millett was the 7th child of John

Nicholas Richards Millett (1807-1885) and

Mary Ley (about 1804-1888), who married on

15 May 1830 at St George’s, Hanover Square,

London. William was born on 2 May 1840 at

Penzance, Cornwall. He gave his occupation

as Mariner, and was employed as a merchant

seaman by the P & O Steamship Company.

He emigrated to Australia via Boston, Mass.

on the Hollander, arriving on 24 April 1857 at

Hobson's Bay, Melbourne. William married

Emma Halse Murphy (about 1833-1880) in

1872 at Sydney; they did not have any

children. He died on 15 July 1877, being

drowned at sea off Newcastle, 48 miles northwest

of Sydney, aged 37.

92

Awards

1863 silver medal of the Shipwrecked Mariners’ Society presented to him by the Mayor of

Penzance. 1863 bronze medal of the Royal Humane Society. 4 June 1866 Albert medal of

first class (being the second person who received it). Third Officer of P. and O. steamship

Emeu. Chief Officer of P. and O.S.N. Company’s steamer Yara Yara, in the foundering of

which ship off Newcastle N.S.W. Australia he was lost 15 July 1877, aged 37.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 580.

Rescue of mail-boat crew

THE LATE ACCIDENT IN THE BAY. – On Wednesday last, when the Government mailboat

was capsized, the accident was first discovered by the officers on duty on board the ship

Lincolnshire, which was fortunately moored at the outside berth of the Hobson’s Bay

Railway Pier. Volunteers were called for from the crew, and every man gallantly offered his

services. The ship’s jolly-boat was fortunately alongside, and was immediately manned by

the third officer, Mr. William Millett, and four men, named Davis, Reardon, Shepherd, and

Sullivan, who proceeded to the capsized boat, and succeeded in rescuing the mail-master, Mr.

Joyce, and his crew of four men. A fearful sea was running at the time, while the gale blew

with great fury. So high was the sea, that the boat, to prevent being swamped, was obliged to

be run on the beach, as she could not make the ship. Great credit is due to Mr. Millett and the

crew of the Lincolnshire for the gallant manner in which they rescued the crew, as their

strength was almost failing them when the Lincolnshire’s boat reached them. We trust that

the gallant conduct of Mr. Millett and his men will receive a handsome reward.

Source: The Argus (Melbourne) no. 5214, Friday 20 February 1863, p. 4 col. 1.

Award of Silver Medal, Shipwrecked Mariners’ Society

May 1, 1863: A letter was read from John N. R. Millett, Esq, forwarded to the Melbourne

Argus, with an extract from the letter regarding his son, Mr. Wm. H. Millett, 3rd Mate of the

Lincolnshire, wherein it is stated that the Mail Boat (in Hobson’s Bay), with five hands,

having capsized, the latter with four men proceeded to their assistance, in the Jolly Boat of

the Lincolnshire, the wind blowing a furious gale with a fearful sea: having got the drowning

men in to the boat, they were unable to regain the ship, but happily saved all by beaching the

boat, those jumping overboard that could swim before she took the beach. It was proposed

by Captain Hon. Fras. Maude, RN - seconded by Captain Warden RN CB and carried

unanimously:

That this Committee recognize the gallantry and self devotion of Mr. Wm. H. Millett, by

awarding him the Silver Medal of the Society, together with a copy of the minute in the

testimonial frame, and to the four men, Davis, Reardon, Shepherd, and Sullivan a Silver

Medal each.

Source: The Shipwrecked Mariner 1 May 1863 (via Brian Richard Antill Millett)

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In 1863 William Halse Millett also received the Bronze Medal of the Royal Humane Society

for his part in this rescue.

Shipwreck of the Diamond, 20 June 1866

One of the most notable of recent wreck stories is that which tells of the loss of the ship

Diamond, of Calcutta. She was sailing from Jeddo for Calcutta, with a crew of 47 hands,

about 400 passengers (all of whom were Mahometan pilgrims), and a cargo of salt. Being

dismasted, she bore up for Bombay, and was driven on the rocks at Breach Candy, where a

heavy sea broke over her, the place being exposed to the full force of the south-west

monsoon. Attempts were at once made by people on the spot to render assistance, which

were not at first successful. Several persons reached the shore by swimming and by means of

spars, &c. and some lost their lives in the attempt. On the following two days the exertions

of those who took part in rendering assistance were renewed, and those who remained on

board were safely landed. …

On the occasion of the same wreck Mr. W. H. Millett, third officer of the Peninsular and

Oriental Company’s steamship Emeu, also rendered good service. He was in command of a

lifeboat sent overland to the scene of the wreck by the Superintendent of the Peninsular and

Oriental Steam Navigation Company at Bombay. Upon his arrival Mr. Millett, accompanied

by Mr. Greaves, the Company’s dockmaster, and a crew of twelve Chinamen, proceeded to

the wreck, and in two trips brought ashore some of the passengers. On the following day he

made seven trips, and succeeded in landing safely altogether 120 people. During the time he

was engaged in this service the sea was very heavy, and the boat was continually filled with

water. On two trips Mr. Millett was washed out of the boat, and was with difficulty saved,

but he continued his work until the last passenger was landed. The Albert medal of the first

class has been awarded to Mr. Millett for the services we have briefly described.

Source: The Guardian (London) 8 October 1868, p. 3. Another account is given in

the London Gazette 7 June 1867 p. 3226-3227.

Award of Albert Medal

The Queen has conferred the decoration of “The Albert Medal of the First Class” on W. H.

Millett, third officer on board the Peninsular and Oriental Company’s steamship Emeu.

Source: The Guardian (London) 11 June 1867, p. 7.

Mr MILLETT was in command of a lifeboat sent overland to the scene of the wreck [of the

Diamond] by the Superintendent of the Peninsular and Oriental Company, at Bombay. Upon

her arrival, on the 21st June, Mr MILLETT, accompanied by Mr H. B. Greaves, the

Company’s Dockmaster, and a crew of 12 Chinamen, proceeded in her to the wreck, and in

two trips brought ashore some of the passengers. On the following day he made seven trips,

and succeeded in landing in safety altogether 120 people.

During the time he was engaged in this service the sea was very heavy, and the boat was

continually filled with water. On two trips Mr MILLETT was washed out of the boat, and

was with difficulty saved, but he continued his work until the last passenger was landed.

94

Source: Edinburgh Gazette 11 June 1867, p. 660.

Marriage

William Halse Millett in 1872 married Emma Halse Millett (nee Murphy), widow of his

oldest brother John Millett, because she was apparently in dire circumstances following

John’s death in 1867, and he decided to take on responsibility for Emma and her three

children.

Source: Brian Richard Antill Millett.

Life and death

The Late William Halse Millett.

The last Australian mail brings news of the loss, with all hands, of the Yara-Yara, off

Newcastle, during a fearful storm on the 15th of July. Her chief officer was Mr. W. Halse

Millett, 5th son of John Millett, Esq., of Bosavern, St. Just, a name so well-known to many

that its bearer certainly deserves more than the brief notice of a colonial newspaper.

The circumstances of Mr. W. Millett’s death are rendered particularly painful by the fact that

he, whose gallant and successful efforts in saving life from shipwreck have rarely been

equalled, was lost through some strange misunderstanding on the part of the Signal Hill lookout

man. No second gun was fired, and therefore the lifeboat did not put out. Mr. Millett, a

powerful swimmer, had actually reached the line of breakers, more than a mile from his ship;

and that help was not forthcoming for him who had so often and so nobly helped to rescue

others makes the sad loss still sadder: from time to time notices of Mr. Millett’s heroism

have appeared in the Cornish Telegraph and other papers. It is well to recall some few of

them to our readers’ recollection.

In 1863, being then a mere lad, he went off in the jolly-boat of the ship Lincolnshire, of

which he was then third officer, and saved the Port Philip mail-master and four seamen, the

mail-boat having capsized in a hurricane. For this, he received a silver medal and testimonial

from the Shipwrecked Mariners’ Society, and also the bronze medal of the Royal Humane

Society; the former was publicly presented to him by the Mayor of Penzance.

Three years after when the ship Diamond, with 450 pilgrims from Jeddah to Calcutta, had

gone ashore at Breach Candy, near Bombay, Mr. Millett, the third officer of the P. and O.

steamer Emeu, manned a P and O lifeboat with Chinese boatmen, and, though several times

capsized, succeeded in making several trips, and in rescuing 140 persons. For this gallant act

the Queen awarded to him the Albert medal of the first-class, of which high honour he was

the second recipient. The medal was presented, “in the name of Her Majesty”, by

Commodore Young, J.N., C.B., at a dinner on board the P. and O. steamer Delhi, in June,

1866.

Next year Mr. Millett saved the life of a Parsee gentleman at Suez, at imminent risk to his

own life. He says in a letter home: – “I have had a very narrow escape from being drowned.

At 1.30 a.m., the small transit-steamer came alongside with our passengers for Bombay. A

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good many had got on board, when, by some unaccountable means, the transit-boat drew off

about three feet, and a Parsee, who was foremost among those left behind, fell between the

two ships. I at once kicked off my shoes and, plunging in, clutched him, but lost him. I then

dived again, and at last found him, – he had been drawn under the big vessel. I very nearly

lost my strength; but I just managed to get hold of the paddle of the steamer with one hand,

while I held him up with the other till we were pulled on board the transit-steamer. I was

very much exhausted, and could not have held on much longer; but, through God’s

assistance, I have had the happiness of saving another fellow-creature from a watery grave.”

These few facts and this characteristic letter are enough to shew that Mr. W. Millett was a

man of whom West Cornwall may well be proud. When returning thanks for the presentation

of the Albert medal he said: – “I can assure you that I shall never hesitate to run any risk in

the endeavour to rescue a fellow-creature”; and all his life through, he kept his word.

This is not the place to enlarge on his geniality and kindness in private life; but facts like

those briefly recorded above belong to his county and to his country. He has left a name

which will not soon be forgotten by those who care to hold in mind the annals of disinterested

heroism; and his friends have at least the satisfaction of feeling that he set a pattern of which

not only all Cornishmen but all Englishmen may well be proud.

Source: Cornish Telegraph 2 October 1877, page 3 column 5.

Inquest

The following is the finding of the jury empanelled to investigate the Yarra Yarra disaster :-

“The jury are of opinion that the deceased William Halse Millett, on the 15th day of July,

1877, being with others in a certain steamer named the Yarra Yarra, was thrown out and

drowned.” The following rider was added:- “Had the Lifeboat Committee been more

energetic in the several duties assigned to them there was every chance of life being saved.

We also find from the evidence that another cause of the lifesaving appliances being almost

useless is the want of sufficient funds to keep an efficient lifeboat crew when required. The

necessity for increased endowment for such purposes has for a considerable period been

pointed out to the Government. They recommend that the Government give the matter their

careful and immediate attention, in order that the service may be thereby made more

efficient.”

Source: Brisbane Courier Friday 3 August 1877, p. 2 col. 7.

Extracts from letter from Mother Mary Millett to Widow Emma Halse Millett, 17

October 1877

The loss of our beloved William has been a most bitter trial to us both & this has been

painfully aggravated by the knowledge that his dear life might have been saved had he only

[illegible] with that humanity which he was always so ready to show to others in similar

distress. It does seem so hard that not a hand was put forth to help him in his last struggle, he

who had so nobly and so often took as his own in rescuing his fellow men. ... The conduct of

the Life Boat Committee & its management could not be too seriously deprecated. I look

96

upon it that our dear one and others of the crew were sacrificed to their [illegible] and their

faulty management – I have no heart or spirits to write than add our kind love to you all.

Source: Original letter (via Brian Richard Antill Millett).

73. ARTHUR FENNING MILLETT (1841-1885)

Arthur Fenning Millett was the 3rd child of Honey Millett (1809-1847) and Mary Ann Turner

(1815-1889), who married on 24 November 1834 at St Hilary, Cornwall. Arthur was born on

18 October 1841. He was educated at Christ’s Hospital School near Horsham, Sussex and

the University of Cambridge, and joined the Indian Civil Service. He married Anna Maria

Louisa Lane (b. about 1840) on 16 August 1862 at Old Church, St Pancras, London; they

had one child, Katie Florence Millett (b. 6 June 1863). Arthur died on 22 December 1885 at

Benares, Uttar Pradesh, India aged 44.

Life and death

Admitted to Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge 11 June 1860; matriculated Michaelmas

Term 1860; Scholar 1861. Appointed to Bengal Civil Service 1861; Assistant Magistrate

and Collector, N. W. Provinces, 1864-1865; Assistant Commissioner of Oudh, 1865-1881;

Assistant Settlement Officer, 1866-1881; Deputy Commissioner 1881; District and Sessions

Judge, N. W. Provinces, 1883-1885. Died 22 December 1885 at Benares.

Source: Cambridge University Alumni, 1261-1900.

Education

On 21 September 1860 Arthur Fenning Millett,”Second Grecian, Montefiore prizeman of the

present year, and Exhibitioner of Trinity Hall, Cambridge” gave an oration, in French, at the

seminary of Christ’s Hospital, London, laudatory of the founder, King Edward VI. “The

French oration of Mr. Millett was a very spirited performance, both in matter and manner,

and was greatly applauded. This was probably owing not so much to any superiority it had

over the Latin and Greek orations as to its being more intelligible to a company the greater

part of whom were ladies, and therefore more appreciable.”

Source: The Times 22 September 1860, p. 9 col. E.

Appointments

Mr. A. F. Millet, assistant commissioner, third grade, Oude, has been invested with the

powers of a subordinate magistrate of the first grade.

Mr. A. F. Millet has been appointed to be assistant commissioner, third grade, Oudh

Commission.

97

Source: The Times 30 April 1866, p. 7.

Mr. A. F. Millett, of the Bengal Civil Service, assistant settlement officer, has been appointed

to officiate as settlement officer of Sultanpore, in Oudh.

Source: The Times Saturday 26 June 1869, p. 11 col. F.

Mr. A. F. Millett, Assistant Settlement Officer, and officiating settlement officer of

Sultanpore, has been appointed to be assistant commissioner, second grade, Oudh

Commission.

Source: The Times Saturday 13 April 1872, p. 12 col. B.

Publications

Report on the settlement of the land revenue of the Fyzabad District. Allahabad, Northwestern

Provinces and Oudh Govt. Press, 1880. 647 p.

Report on the settlement of the land revenue of the Sultanpur District. Lucknow, Printed at

the Oudh Govt. Press, 1873. 359 p.

Source: British Library Integrated Catalogue.

http://catalogue.bl.uk/F/?func=file&file_name=login-bl-list.

74. EDWARD WAUGH MILLETT (1842-1886)

Edward Waugh Millett was the 7th child of Charles Millett (1792-1873) and Anne Crohan (d.

1899), who married on 17 May 1834 at St George’s, Hanover Square, London. Edward was

born on 13 March 1842 at Hill Place, Droxford, Hampshire, and baptised on 18 May 1842 at

Droxford. He was educated at Cheltenham College, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. He

emigrated to New Zealand in 1863. He partnered with Edward George Griffiths in the firm

of Millett and Griffiths, livery-stable keepers who hired out ox teams. Edward married

Katherine Fearon (1853-1875) on 28 January 1873 at Christchurch; they had one child,

Sydney Charles Millett (1874-1950). Edward died on 10 August 1886 at St Albans,

Christchurch aged 44, and was buried on 12 August 1886 at the Church of England

Cemetery, Christchurch.

Emigration to New Zealand

Edward Waugh Millett was sent to New Zealand, or asked to go there, by his family after he

was dismissed from the East India Company. Apparently Edward was not happy with some

of the corruption within the company by some members of the family, hence he was sacked,

given a sum of money and sent off to New Zealand.

98

Source: Nigel Cooper (email)

Accident

Mr. E. W. Millett, of Christchurch, has been severely kicked by one of his horses whilst he

was passing through the stable. All his front teeth were knocked out, and his jaw injured.

Source: Daily Southern Cross (Auckland) 15 February 1872, p. 3.

Cavalry Volunteers

Appointed Sub-Lieutenant of the Christchurch Yeomanry Cavalry Volunteers on 29 January

1880. Resigned 18 July 1882.

Sources: New Zealand Gazette no. 43, 29 April 1880, p. 597; no. 73, 31 August

1882, p. 1196.

Partnership

Edward Waugh Millet’s partnership with Edward George Griffith as Livery-Stable Keepers

at Christchurch, under the firm of Millet and Griffith, is dissolved as from 31 May 1880. The

business will henceforth be carried out by Edward Waugh Millet on his own account.

Source: New Zealand Gazette no. 72, 22 July 1880, p. 1066.

Cause of death

According to Robyn Bray, Edward Waugh Millett “was run over and killed by a cyclist on a

Penny Farthing bike in Christchurch New Zealand” (see Ancestors of Bob & Robyn Bray.

http://www.thetreeofus.net/5/128883.html). However, his death certificate gives “Cause of

Death: pneumonia”.

Racing obituary

An old identity and one who in his day did yeoman service for the Canterbury Jockey Club,

“passed to his checks” this afternoon. Mr. E. W. Millett, better known as Tom Millett died

today at the age of 45. He officiated as clerk to the course from a very early date in racing in

Canterbury, and was always to the fore in matters affecting sport. Associated at one time

with Mr. E. G. Griffiths, they owned some good bred ones and ran them gamely and fairly,

but of late years he has lived on an annuity and has not figured in racing circles much.

Source: Otago Witness 13 August 1886, p. 24 (via PapersPast,

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

99

Will and Probate

10th August 1886 Christchurch New Zealand Probate Indexes: Probate 20th December 1887

- The Will of Edward Waugh Millett late of Christchurch in the Colony of New Zealand who

died 10th August 1886 at Christchurch was proved at the Principal Registry by Charles

Frederic Millett of 1 Old Palace Yard in the City of Westminster Esquire, the Brother one of

the executors. Personal Estate £2147 1s 3d.

Supreme Court Of Canterbury - In the matter of Edward Waugh Millett deceased. Copy Will

Re sealed 12 March 1888 - Harper Christchurch, New Zealand. This is the last Will and

Testament of me Edward Waugh Millett of Christchurch New Zealand. I nominate and

appoint Charles Frederick Millett of No.1 Old Palace Yard Westminster and George Griffiths

of Christchurch New Zealand Executors and Trustees of this my Will and Guardians of my

Son Sydney Charles Millett. I give bequeath and devise all my real and personal estate

whatsoever in possession expectancy and reversion to my said executors and trustees In Trust

for my said son Sydney Charles. And revoking all former wills I declare this to be my last

Will and Testament. In witness whereof I have to this my last will and Testament Set my

hand this tenth day of February 1876. E. W. Millett. Signed by the said Edward Waugh

Millett as his last will and testament in the presence of us being present at the same time who

at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other subscribe our names as

witnesses - Claudett Millett Kathleen Millett.

Probate - The Principal Registry In Her Majesty’s High Court of Justice. Be it known that at

the date hereunder written the last Will and Testament (a copy whereof is hereunto annexed)

of Edward Waugh Millett late of Christchurch in the Colony of New Zealand, deceased who

died on the tenth day of August 1886 at Christchurch aforesaid was proved and registered in

the Principal Registry of the Probate Division of Her Majesty’s High Court of Justice and that

administration of the personal estate of the said deceased was granted by the aforesaid court

to Charles Frederick Millett Esquire, the Brother of the said deceased one of the executors

named in the said will he having first sworn well and faithfully to administer the same.

Edward George Griffiths the other executor named in the said Will having renounced the

Probate and execution thereof. And it is hereby certified that an affidavit in verification of

the account of the said estate has been delivered duly stamped wherein it is shown that the

gross value of the said estate amounts to £2147 1s 5d and no more. Dated the 20th day of

December 1887. Robt A Pritchard - Registrar.

Source: Probate records, Archives New Zealand Christchurch Office.

100

75. GEORGE BOWN MILLETT (1842-1896)

George Bown Millett was the 2nd child of Richard Millett (1807-1865) and Anne Nicholls

Harris (1821-1871), who married on 19 February 1839 at Madron, Cornwall. George was

born on 27 June 1842 at Penzance, and baptised on 30 September 1842 at Madron. He was

educated by private tutors. In 1862 he attended St Mary’s Hospital, London, and became a

doctor in 1865 – M.R.C.S. Eng. (Member of the Royal College of Surgeons, England) in

1865; L.R.C.P. Edinb. (Licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians, Edinburgh) in 1866;

and L.S.A. (Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries) also in 1866. He was a doctor in

Penzance from 1865 to 1896, and between 26 September 1877 and September 1896 he was

Medical Officer of Health for the Urban and Port Sanitary Authority in Penzance. During

his life he held a number of positions in Penzance: Hon. Secretary of the National History

and Antiquarian Society’s Museum; President of the Penzance Institute; Secretary of the

Penzance Public Library, and Librarian from 14 January 1889 to September 1896;

Secretary of the Penzance Natural History and Antiquarian Society, and President

1886/1887; Secretary of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall; and Vice-President of

the C.E.T.S. (Church of England Temperance Society). He was a corresponding member of

the New England Historic Genealogical Society. He died, unmarried, on 17 September 1896

at his home at 19 Chapel Street, Penzance aged 54, and was buried on 21 September 1896 in

the family vault at Madron.

101

Songs

Mr Millett has not been an extensive verse writer, but some of his songs, which he has set to

music, are exceedingly popular in the West of England, and are of sufficient merit to warrant

the inclusion of his name in our list of West-Country poetical writers.

Source: Wright, William Henry Kearley. West-Country poets: their lives and

works: being an account of about four hundred verse writers of Devon and Cornwall,

with poems and extracts. London, Elliot Stock, 1896, p. 334.

Publications by George Bown Millett

Account of the Price family mausoleum in Madron churchyard. Reports and Transactions of

the Penzance Natural History and Antiquarian Society 1881-1882. Plymouth, W. Brendon,

1882, p. 180-181.

The Bonython flagon. Notes and Queries ser. 6 v. I, 24 April 1880, p. 345-346.

Note on a silver chalice at St Mary’s Church, Penzance, Cornwall, donated in 1670 by

Blanche Bonithon.

Burial usages in Cornwall. Notes and Queries ser. 4 v. IX, 4 May 1872, p. 358.

Details the costs of the funeral of Sarah Ustick, who died in St Just-in-Penwith, Cornwall

on 23 October 1725.

Cornish ditties by George B. Millett. In Poems of Cornwall by thirty Cornish authors, edited

by William Herbert Thomas. Penzance, F. Rodda, 1892, p. 161-167.

Includes three songs: “The Mayor of Market-Jew”, “The Zennor Mermaid” and “Paul

Church Town”.

Cornish ditties. (Written and composed by G.B. Millett). Penzance, F. Rodda, 1892.

Excursion 1 October 1880 to Chapel Karn Brea and St Just. Transactions of the Penzance

Natural History and Antiquarian Society 1880-81, p. 13-21.

The first book of the parish registers of Madron in the county of Cornwall. Penzance, Beare

and Son, 1877. 140 p. with 3 photographs.

Genealogical memoranda as to the Millett family. Penzance, March 1870. 4 p. (Manuscript,

unpublished).

Genealogy manuscript book. (Manuscript, unpublished).

Great Panjandrum song. Words by Samuel Foote.

The late Mrs. Short née Miss Millett, of St. Hilary. One and All: a Cornish monthly

illustrated journal, news-letter, and record of local history February 1869.

Millett Family Tree. 1 p. (Manuscript, unpublished).

102

Not forsaken: song. Words by the late Miss A. Pethybridge. Music by George Bown Millett.

London, Spottiswoode & Co, 1889. Score (6 p.)

The official guide to Penzance. Penzance, Beare and Son, 1876. 111 p.

Edited by George Bown Millett, who also wrote the history of Penzance (p. 1-15) and

compiled the notes on the climate (p. 46-56).

Old MSS. to mend, or tulle and tatters. Notes and Queries ser. 5 v. II, 26 September 1874, p.

246-247.

Describes the use of tulle in the repair of the parchment leaves of an ancient parish

register.

An old seal. Notes and Queries ser. 5 v. IV, 27 November 1875, p. 428-429.

Query concerning a family seal in George Bown Millett’s possession, which bears the

arms of Harris and Bown.

The parish registers of Gulval (alias Lanisley) in the County of Cornwall (1598-1812).

Edited, with an introduction and notes, by George Bown Millett and William Bolitho.

Penzance, Beare and Son, 1893. 172 p.

Reprinted Bowie, MD, Heritage Books, 1995.

Penzance Natural History and Antiquarian Society: Presidential Address. Transactions of

the Penzance Natural History and Antiquarian Society 1887-88, p. 339-343.

Penzance Natural History and Antiquarian Society: proposals for a revival of the Society,

May 1880.

Penzance Natural History and Antiquarian Society. Reports and Transactions 1880-1881.

Plymouth, W. Brendon and Son, 1881. 76 p.

Report written and Transactions edited by George Bown Millett.

Penzance, past and present: a lecture delivered at the Penzance Institute on the 13th March,

1876. With a list of the mayors of Penzance and other additional matter. Penzance, Beare

and Son, 1876. 52 p. with 7 woodcuts.

Penzance, past and present: a second lecture delivered at the Penzance Institute on the 25th

March, 1878. With a plan of the centre of old Penzance, and with additional matter.

Penzance, Beare and Son, 1880. 51 p.

Phillis: Cornish song. Written and composed by George Bown Millett. London,

Spottiswoode & Co, 1886. Score (6 p.)

Porcelain figure. Notes and Queries ser. 4 v. X, 3 August 1872, p. 97.

Query concerning an Oriental porcelain female figure in George Bown Millett’s

possession.

Trelawny: the song of the western men. Words by Robert Stephen Hawker. Music by

George Bown Millett. London, Spottiswoode & Co, 1886. Score (5 p.)

103

Vox lapidis: a plaint heard in Saint Mary’s churchyard, Penzance. Penzance, Beare and Son,

Printers, 1882. 12 p.

Publications about George Bown Millett

G. B. Millett. In Wright, William Henry Kearley. West-country poets: their lives and works:

being an account of about four hundred verse writers of Devon and Cornwall, with poems

and extracts. London, Elliot Stock, 1896, p. 334-335.

Includes a song by George Bown Millett: “The Mayor of Market-Jew”.

(Market-Jew is the ancient name for Marazion, Cornwall, England).

George Bown Millett. In Memorial biographies of the New England Historic Genealogical

Society. Boston, the Society, 1880-1908. Volume 9 (1890-1897) p. 353-354.

George Bown Millett, L.R.C.P. Edin., M.R.C.S. Eng., L.S.A. The Lancet 26 September

1896, p. 618.

Obituary.

The late Mr. G. B. Millett. Black and White: a Weekly Illustrated Record and Review 26

September 1896 p. 388.

Photograph.

Millett, George Bown. In Boase, Frederic. Modern English biography: containing many

thousand concise memoirs of persons who have died between the years 1851-1900, with an

index of the most interesting matter. Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1892-1921; London, F.

Cass, 1965. Vol. 5, p. 212-213.

76. CLAUDE HENRY MILLETT (1846-1924)

Claude Henry Millett was the 11th child of Charles Millett (1792-1873) and Anne Crohan (d.

1899), who married on 17 May 1834 at St George’s, Hanover Square, London. Claude was

born on 13 September 1846 at 31 Dover Street, Piccadilly, London, and baptised on 23

October 1846, and on 29 November 1849 at St George’s, Hanover Square. He served in the

Royal Navy, reaching the rank of Commander. He married Alice Catherine Olliver on 24

May 1888 at Ferring, Sussex; they had 5 children. Claude died on 23 February 1924 at

Warblington, Hampshire aged 78, and was buried there on 28 February 1924.

Naval career

Naval cadet June 1860; Sub-Lieutenant 30 August 1867; Lieutenant 29 December 1871.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 571.

104

Appointments

The following appointments were made at the Admiralty yesterday: ... Claude H. Millet, to

the Hercules.

Source: The Times 20 December 1881, p. 10 col. A.

The following appointments were made at the Admiralty yesterday: ... Claude H. Millet, to

the Defence, additional, for service in the Dwarf, in command.

Source: The Times 3 June 1884, p. 4 col. B.

Retirement

In accordance with the provisions of her Majesty’s Order in Council of Feb. 22, 1870, Lieut.

Claude Henry Millett has been placed on the Retired List, with permission to assume the rank

of Commander.

Source: The Times 10 October 1891, p. 11 col. B.

77. HENRY HALSE MILLETT (1846-1877)

Henry Halse Millett was the 9th child of John Nicholas Richards Millett (1807-1885) and

Mary Ley (about 1804-1888), who married on 15 May 1830 at St George’s, Hanover Square,

London. Henry was born on 29 March 1846. He was officiating inspector of schools,

Lahore circle, Punjab, India. He married Frances Maria Trafford (1837-1898) on 21

October 1868 at Hoshiarpur, Punjab, India. He died on 19 March 1877 at London aged 31,

and was buried on 21 March 1877 at Colney Hatch, London.

Appointment

Mr. H. H. Millett has been appointed to be second master of the Delhi Zilla School.

Source: The Times Monday 29 August 1864, p. 10 col. B

105

78. KATE MILLETT (née Leslie) (1851-1921)

Kate Leslie was the 1st daughter of Walter

Alexander Leslie and Elizabeth Morice, who

married on 19 March 1850 at Bombay, India.

Kate was born on 30 January 1851 at Honore,

Madras, and baptised on 23 March 1851 at

Madras. She married Towers Trevorian Millett

(1852-1882) on 20 February 1878 at St Stephen’s,

Hampstead, London; they had 2 children. Kate

emigrated to New Zealand with her future

daughter-in-law, Isabella Robertson Fletcher

(1881-1965), on 7 November 1901 on the Papanui,

arriving in Wellington on 31 December 1901. She

died on 27 December 1921 at Te Aruhe,

Marlborough, New Zealand aged 70, and was

buried on 29 December 1921 at Havelock,

Marlborough.

Voyage to New Zealand

PAPANUI, FROM LONDON

The New Zealand Shipping Company’s steamer Papanui arrived this afternoon from London

via Capetown and Hobart. She brought the following passengers for Wellington :–First

saloon–Rev Dewing, Messrs Mallalleu, Spencer. Second saloon–Misses Elder (3), Hoddinot,

Fletcher, Martin, Mesdames Elder, Jacob, Millett, Revs Murray, Jacob, Messrs Dowson,

Duxburg, Nicholas, Masters, Elder (3), and 31 third-class. She has also 114 for all other

ports. Three thousand six hundred tons of cargo will be discharged at this port.

Source: Evening Post vol. 62 issue 156, 31 December 1901, p. 6

(via PapersPast, http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

Passenger lists leaving UK 1890-1960

Name Mrs K Millett

Date of departure 7 November 1901

Port of departure London

Destination port Wellington

Destination country New Zealand

Age 50

106

Marital status Married

Sex Female

Occupation Housewife

Ship Papanui

Master’s name F Forbes

Steamship Line The New Zealand Shipping Company Limited

Where bound New Zealand

Square feet 2344

Registered tonnage 4242

Passengers on voyage 169

Source: http://www.FindMyPast.com.

The Papanui

Built in 1898 by Wm Deny & Bros, Dumbarton, Scotland for the New Zealand Shipping

Company, the Papanui was a 6,372 gross ton ship, length 430 ft x beam 54.1 ft (131.06 m x

16.49 m), one funnel, two masts (square rigged for sail on the foremast), single screw and a

speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 34 1st, 45 2nd and 400 emigrant class

passengers. She carried a crew of 108. She was sold off in December 1909 after striking an

uncharted rock off the coast of Tasmania, Australia.

79. TOWERS TREVORIAN MILLETT (1852-1882)

Towers Trevorian Millett was the 6th child of Richard

Millett (1807-1865) and Anne Nicholls Harris (1821-

1871), who married on 19 February 1839 at

Madron, Cornwall. Towers was born on 28

December 1852 at Parade Street, Penzance,

Cornwall, and baptised there on 24 March 1853. He

was educated at Penzance under J. A. Thorne, and at

St Austle under Dr Drake. He emigrated to India on

1 March 1871, and joined the Madras Police Corps.

He married Kate Leslie (1851-1921) on 20 February

1878 at St Stephen’s, Hampstead, London; they had

two children, Martin Leslie Millett (1878-1951) and

George Nicholls Millett (1880-1962). Towers died

on 5 August 1882 at Rajahmundry, Madras aged 30,

and was buried there the next day. Following his

death, his widow and children returned to England.

107

Life

Sailed for India 1 March 1871; of Madras Police Corps 1871; Acting Assistant

Superintendent of Police Godavery, Madras to 1876; Acting Superintendent August 1878;

Town Commissioner under Towns Improvement Act for Negapatam 17 May 1876. A

contributor to Land and Water.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 579.

Tiger Shooting

The following interesting account is taken from the diary of Mr. Millett, assistant

superintendent of police in Vizagapatam : –

28th,– Went out looking for tracks of tiger; visited some of the hill villages, and promised the

“Hill Dhoras” 100 rupees if they could show me a tiger. They professed their readiness, but

were evidently not in earnest. Went through the jungles all day and found any amount of

tracks of tiger quite recent.

On returning home found “khubber” [news] that a large tiger had killed a fine buffalo about

four miles off. Started with some constables, but did not reach the place until after dark.

Found the bullock in a water-course in dense jungle. Some one said he heard a growl, and

there was a stampede, and I was left alone, so I had to back out again. The tiger had eaten a

large quantity, so I knew he would not return that night. Next day the Hill Dhoras came

down as they saw I meant work, and, having made a screen of bushes, I and three of their best

men sat there all day, hoping the tiger would come about sunset, but he did not.

. . . . . .

I have made inquiries about the tigers here, and find that in 1869 ten persons were killed by

tigers, in 1870 six, in 1871 eleven, in 1872 twenty-nine, up to date, 1873, fifteen, making a

total of 71 persons in five years. I am afraid this does not accurately represent the loss of life,

as many persons have been missed and nothing further heard of them, and in out-of-the-way

villages far away into the hills, I doubt if people trouble themselves to report such things.

The mischief done to cattle cannot be exactly estimated. From information I can gather in

Pachipenta I calculate that not less than 500 head of cattle are destroyed annually, and this is

a very moderate estimate. In the course of my scramble among the hills I came upon no less

than three villages deserted, and I am informed that more than ten villages have been deserted

through the inhabitants being carried away by tigers. I came upon beautiful meadows bearing

splendid grass and old fields lying uncultivated. Asking the question why these were not

brought under cultivation the hillmen said “Pedda Pulli bhaiyam chata”, and this is the

invariable reply. From the amount of tracks I am convinced that there are many tigers about

here, but probably one does the man-eating business. Everyone here, and many persons have

seen him, describes him to be an enormous tiger with a mane like a Pegue pony, and this I

can vouch for as a fact, having, as will be seen hereafter, formed a close acquaintance with

him.

108

On 31st the Hill Dhoras came in during the night, and we started at dawn and tramped six or

seven miles over the hills until we came to the thickest part of the jungle where they said we

should find a tiger. It is, I believe, a fact that a tiger, unlike most wild animals, never breaks

cover through dense jungle, but through some small path or drive; such at least is the opinion

of the hillmen, and in consequence I was posted in a glade behind a bush while they went

round to beat the jungle. Before long I heard two shots, the signal agreed upon if a tiger was

found, and we were expecting the tiger to appear every minute, when a beater came running

up to say the tiger had got into a thick bamboo jungle, and would not come out. Inspector

Soobiah got left behind, he coming over the hills, and I did not like trusting constables with

any spare guns, so I picked out two hillmen, and gave them to their charge.

Forming the beaters into line with the matchlocks at regular intervals, and tom-toms making a

most devilish row, we drove the tiger down one hill and half-way up another, using the axe

the whole way, the bamboo being so dense. At last, just as I was beginning to think it all up,

a beater saw the tiger lying on a stone under a clump of bamboos. There was an immediate

stampede, and I thought the tiger would be among us every minute. However, three men

volunteered to come with me, so we crept up the hill until we got above it, and after some

time I sighted the brute between the bamboos and shot him through the shoulder; as he rose I

gave him a second, which killed him on the spot. As it rolled over the stone, the matchlock

men fired a volley, which did great damage to the bamboos and rocks, and one shot hit the

dead tiger in the paw. I measured it and found it to be 9 ft. 7 in. in length, a splendid fullgrown

tigress, and very proud I felt over my first tiger. As we returned home, all the

villagers rose, and I suppose a thousand people accompanied us to Pachipenta. The din and

dust and glare were overpowering, and I was glad to get into my camp. Arrived, I found

information that a huge tiger had killed two bullocks close to the spot from which we had just

returned. I started off again, but got benighted, and had to return. On Saturday, November

1st, went to the place and found the two bullocks, one untouched and the other partly eaten.

We beat the jungle all day, and about 4 p.m. I resolved to beat back towards the bullocks. I

was placed in front of some bushes in the path across which it was expected the tiger would

break, having with me one Gungen Dhora and Head constable Mahomed Alli. We had not

been seated long before we heard a tremendous crushing of bones and tearing of flesh, the

fact being that we had sat down in front of the bush behind which the dead bullock was, and

the tiger was eating his dinner. As the beaters drew near, the brute began to growl, so I

thought this rather too dangerous, being unable to see anything in the dense thicket in which

he was. I sent to stop the beaters and bring them round to beat the tiger out, and after some

time we went up in line to the bullock, when we found it dragged away a little distance. I

took up a position a little further down the path and sat down with Inspector Soobiah and

Gungen Dhora. After some time the brute walked across the path about 50 paces in front of

me. As he caught sight of us he stopped, and I gave him a bullet through the shoulder. He

dropped and lay kicking about for some time rolling, and recovering I fired again at his head,

but the beaters say they heard this bullet go over their heads, so I suppose I must have

missed; at all events, before I could fire again he rolled into the jungle. By the time I

mustered the beaters it was sunset, and I considered it too dangerous to follow him, although

I did follow him a little distance, and found a large quantity of blood where he had rolled into

the jungle, and blood all about the place. He was evidently hard hit, and will in all

probability die, but I doubt ever recovering his skin in this dense jungle. This tiger was an

enormous animal with a distinct mane, such a huge brute I never saw; and I must say, I did

not like it at all, as, had my shot missed (and a smooth bore is not the most accurate of

weapons, to say nothing of a bad light), I should have, in all probability, been killed, for there

was no wind to blow the smoke away, and I could not have seen him charging.

109

I have promised the Dhoras the hundred rupees for the first tiger, and another hundred if they

find this one. They all say the brute must die, and the rejoicing in Saloor, Pachipenta, and the

hill villages is very great. I am very sorry the brute did not die then and there, as his skin

would have been a trophy worth having. Had I better weapons I think I could render a good

account of the tigers here.

. . . . . .

On the 17th ultimo, His Excellency Lord Hobart passed the following order :– “The Governor

in Council has much pleasure in sanctioning payment of a special reward of 500 rupees to

Mr. Millett in addition to the ordinary rewards which he has promised to the villagers, and

congratulates him on his success. It is understood that the second tiger was subsequently

found dead.”

Source: The Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales) Saturday 14 February 1874, p. 7 (in

British Newspapers 1600-1900 (Gale)).

Notes

The tiger shooting described above took place in October-November 1873, when Towers

Trevorian Millett was aged just 21.

Vizagapatam was a town and district in the Madras Presidency of southern British India, in

what is now the Visakhapatnam district of Andhra Pradesh.

Police service in Central India

The Rumpa disturbances, or rebellion, as some Madras papers persist in calling them, still

drag along slowly without any perceptible change for the better. The Government has

sanctioned the enlistment of a hundred extra constables for service in the disturbed districts,

and two companies of the 17th Madras Native Infantry are being quartered at Nursapalam,

but there is little prospect of any effectual steps being taken in so unhealthy a country until

after the rains. Meanwhile Mr. Millett, police superintendent, is said to be shut up in

Adootagala. A Madras paper states that some merchants carrying supplies for the police

were captured by rioters, who, after taking from them all they had, turned them adrift unhurt,

giving them, moreover, each a rupee.

Source: The Times 14 July 1879 p. 7 col. 1.

Death

T. T. Millett, Assistant Superintendent of Police, died on the 5th of August. ... The loss of

such a promising young officer as Mr. Millett is much to be deplored. He had done good

work during the Rumpa disturbances. While travelling with the Superintendent, he fell ill of

fever and was sent back in his boat from Euore to his house at Nursapoor where his family

resided, but as he became worse he was brought to Rajahmundry and was under treatment for

a week before he succumbed to typhoid fever. Mr. Millett had previously on several

occasions suffered much from attacks of fever both in Vizagapatam and this District.

110

Source: Administration Report of the Madras Police for 1882. Madras, Government

Press, 1883, p. 21.

80. GEORGE PRIDEAUX MILLETT (1863-1950)

George Prideaux Millett was the 2nd child of John Curnow Millett (1828-1870) and Emily

Vincent Vivian (1841-1927), who married on 1 January 1861 at Roseworthy, Gwinear,

Cornwall. George was born on 23 March 1863 at Longford, Gloucestershire. He was

educated at Abbey School, Penzance, Cornwall under J. A. Thorne, and joined the Indian

Forest Service. He married Saidé Russet Millar (1875 to about 1970) on 23 September 1896

at Cheshire; they had 2 children, Humphry John Curnow Millett and Margaret Vivian

Millett. They lived at Upton House, Chester, Cheshire. George was awarded CIE

(Companion of the Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire) on 3 June 1915. He died on

29 December 1950 in London aged 87.

Examinations

Passed 6th out of 120 in Civil Service examination March 1879; passed 5th for Indian Civil

Service February 1882.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 574.

Appointment

Boy Clerk, Army Clothing Department, 1879.

Source: London Gazette 1 July 1879, p. 4214.

Life and death

CIE 1915; Conservator of Forests, Bombay Presidency.

b Longford, near Gloucester, 23 March 1863; s of J. C. Millett, Penzance; m 1896, Saidé

Russet, d of late Charles Gibson Millar, CE, Melbourne, Victoria; three s four d. Work:

Entered Indian Imperial Forest Service, 1884; Senior Conservator of Forests, 1911; retired,

1918; Additional Member of Bombay Legislative Council, 1911-12, and 1914; King-

Emperor’s Durbar Medal, Delhi, 1911; Captain Cheshire Regt (TF), 1915; TFR 1917; Timber

Supply Dept, Board of Trade, 1917-21. Address: 21 Holland Villas Road, Kensington, W14.

Died 29 Dec. 1950.

Source: Who Was Who 1897-2006.

111

Obituary

Mr. George Prideaux Millett, C.I.E., formerly Conservator of Forests in the Bombay

Presidency, died at his home in London yesterday at the age of 87.

The son of Mr. J. C. Millett, he was born on March 23, 1863, and entered the Indian Forest

Service in 1884. In 1907 he was appointed Conservator of Forests in the Bombay Presidency

and he reached the rank of Senior Conservator in 1911. In the same year he was appointed an

additional member of the Legislative Council of the Presidency and served as such for some

12 months. He was again appointed to the Council in the same capacity in 1914 and was

made a C.I.E. in the course of the next year. However, he obtained leave of absence to join

the Territorial Forces and served as a captain in The Cheshire Regiment until seconded in

1917 to the Board of Trade to work in the timber supply department. He continued in the

department until 1921, having formally retired from the Indian Forestry Service in 1918.

He married in 1896 Saidé Russet, daughter of the late C. G. Millar. There were three sons

and four daughters of the marriage.

Source: The Times Saturday 30 December 1950, p. 8 col. D.

81. JOHN LESTER VIVIAN MILLETT (1865-1943)

John Lester Vivian Millett was the 3rd child of

John Curnow Millett (1828-1870) and Emily

Vincent Vivian (1841-1927), who married on 1

January 1861 at Roseworthy, Gwinear,

Cornwall. John was born on 2 May 1865 at

Westfield Lodge, Longford, Gloucestershire.

He served as an apprentice on both The

Tweed and the Cutty Sark, served on a

number of ships, and after retiring from the

sea about 1925 eventually became Managing

Director of the Purfleet Wharf and Sawmills,

Limited, 72 Mark Lane, London. He married

Ellen Vivian on 5 September 1896 at Gwinear,

Cornwall; they had 2 children, Marjorie and

Gladys. John was a member of the Port of

London Authority, and was Commodore of the

Thames Sailing Barge Match from 1930-1938.

John died on 3 June 1943 at Lidden Vean,

Penzance aged 78, and was buried on 7 June

1943 at St Mary’s, Plymouth, Devon.

Hereditary signs of ageing

When the old Customs officer [at Odessa] came on board and was going through the manifest

he suddenly looked up and remarked: “How old are you, captain ?” to which I replied:

112

“How old do you think ?” He said: “Me no’ know. Me look at your head, me think you

fifty. Me look at your face, me think you one boy !” This was owing to my hair rapidly

turning grey, not through worry or anxiety or even early piety, as none of these things

troubled me, but simply because in my family it is hereditary to turn grey at the age of

nineteen or twenty. My father was perfectly white before he was forty, and so was I.

Source: Millett, John Lester Vivian. Yarns of an Old Shellback. London, Methuen,

1925, p. 119.

Qualifications

In a letter to The Times headed “Training in Sail” he signed himself “Captain J. L. Vivian

Millett (Retired Master Mariner with square-rigged Certificate dated May, 1893), Longford,

Kingswear, S. Devon”.

Source: The Times (London) Wednesday 29 June 1938, p. 10 col. D.

Publications

Dispatch in the Port of London. Letter to The Times (London) Thursday 15 November 1923,

p. 18 column E.

Yarns of an old shellback. London, Methuen, 1925. 159 p.

Reviewed in The Guardian (London) 6 July 1925, p. 7.

Heaving-to in a gale. Letter to The Times (London) Saturday 13 February 1926, p. 8 column

B.

Training in sail. Letter to The Times (London) Wednesday 29 June 1838, p. 10 column D.

82. ETHEL MAUDE MILLETT (1867-1920)

Ethel Maude Millett was the daughter of Hugh Ley Millett (1833-1879) and Julia Maria

Woodthorp Childs, who married on 18 October 1866 at St Stephen’s, Coleman Street,

London. Maude was born on 8 November 1867 at Rajanpore, Punjab, India. She became a

very popular actress in London. She married Henry Lancelot Tennant (1866-1933) on 23

February 1897 at St Peter’s, Cranley Gardens, London; they had one child, Hugh Tennant.

Maude died on 16 February 1920 at Teignmouth, Devon aged 53.

113

Interview

A newspaper interviewer once asked “Miss Maud Millett of Terry’s Theatre” whether it was

true that she was “about to be married”. She is reported to have replied “Why, I have never

been made love to, except on the stage. I have never thought of such a thing”.

Besides this remarkable declaration Miss Millett answered the question whether she “came of

a theatrical family” with an equally emphatic negative. “My father was the late Colonel

Millett. He had been all through the Indian Mutiny, and was commanding a station at

Rajanpore in the Punjaub when I was born. I am a Cornish girl, and belong to one of the

oldest county families”.

Source: Birmingham Daily Post Tuesday 11 September 1888 (from Daily News

(London)).

Cricket match

ACTRESSES AT CRICKET

I wonder if any of your readers remember the two cricket matches it was my pleasant

privilege to arrange at the Paddington Recreation Ground in the summer of 1888, between an

eleven composed chiefly of actresses and one of actors and journalists. Among the former

the “bright particular star” was the then very popular ingenue, Maud Millett, whose welltrained

batting was a joy to watch ...

Source: Letter to the Editor by Malcolm C. Salaman. The Times Friday 9 August

1929, p. 8 col. D.

114

Career

An article “A Chat with Miss Maud Millett, by our Special Commissioner” tracing her career

to date is given in The Era (London) Saturday 12 May 1894, p. 11 col. E.

Court action

In the Queen’s Bench division, on Tuesday, before Mr. Justice Wright and a common jury,

Miss Maude Millett sued Mr. Lewis Waller and another to recover £58 6s. 8d. damages for

the breach of an agreement to employ the plaintiff upon the stage. The plaintiff was engaged

to appear at the Shaftesbury, and the point in dispute was as to whether the theatrical custom

meant an engagement for one piece or for the entire term of management, failing any time

being specified. The jury found for the fair plaintiff. There was a verdict and judgment for

the plaintiff for £58 6s. 8d. We are informed Miss Millett proposes to hand the sum awarded

to her to the Secretary of the Actors’ Orphanage.

Source: Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper (London) Sunday 19 July 1896.

Other accounts of the action are given in The Pall Mall Gazette (London) Tuesday 14 July

1896, the Liverpool Mercury Wednesday 15 July 1896, and The Era (London) Saturday 18

July 1896.

Incident during performance

There is a story going the rounds concerning an incident which happened to Miss Maud

Millett when she was playing in Sophia Watersheddings way. The hero, as usual, said to her,

“I have nothing left to offer you – not even the hope of better days to come”. The actor’s

landlady was in the circle, and her lodger’s pathos was too much for her. “Never heed, lad”,

she sang out at the top of a very shrill voice. “Tha’s gotten a real good sooper waiting at

home; thee bring t’ wench wi’ thee”.

Source: Manchester Times Friday 21 January 1898.

Marriage

Miss Maud Millett will shortly quit the stage, where she has been so much admired, owing to

her forthcoming marriage to Captain Tennant, of the Royal Artillery. “None but the brave

deserve the fair”: and the gallant Captain is both brave and highly esteemed. There is a

pleasant joke among his brother officers that his wooing of the charming actress is “the best

of his ‘Millettary’ manoeuvres”: and there is also some lively chaff about having the

assistance of a Canon (of the Church) at the wedding.

Source: The Penny Illustrated Paper and Illustrated Times (London) Saturday 30

January 1897.

115

Retirement from the stage

Miss Maud Millett, who has retired from public life upon her marriage, is a decided loss to

the stage. She was the typical “English girl” of our theatre, and in such parts as Minnie in

Sweet Lavender and Maud in Sunlight and Shadow she was exceedingly good. For more

exacting work she was not so well suited, and her Ellean in The Second Mrs Tanqueray was

scarcely one of her successes. Her charm of manner had much to do with her popularity,

which was great with all playgoers, and especially at Oxford and Cambridge, where it used to

be said that “no undergraduate’s rooms were properly furnished without a photograph of

Miss Maud Millett”.

Source: Otago Witness (Dunedin) 24 June 1897, p. 39 (via PapersPast,

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

Obituary

The death is announced of Mrs. Tennant, better known to the public as Miss Maude Millett,

after a long illness.

Miss Millett, who was born in India in 1867, made her first appearance on the stage at the old

Novelty Theatre in 1884, and as a result she was engaged by Mr. Charles Hawtrey for the

part of Eva Webster in The Private Secretary, which was then running at the Globe Theatre.

Two years later she was playing with Miss Kate Vaughan at the Gaiety. When Sir George

Alexander migrated to the St. James’s Theatre from the Avenue at the end of 1890 Miss

Millett was a member of his company, playing Kate Merryweather in The Idler and Blanche

Ferraby in Liberty Hall. Her services were always in great demand for comedy of the

drawing-room kind, and at one time in her career there was no actress who was more

frequently photographed – in fact, it is said that no undergraduate’s room was complete

without her picture. She left the stage at marriage, but in 1899 she was back at Terry’s

Theatre for a revival of Sweet Lavender. One of her last appearances on the stage was in Mr.

Gerald du Maurier’s production of Sir James Barrie’s fantasy Dear Brutus, at Wyndham’s

Theatre, in 1918.

Miss Millett, who married Colonel Tennant, of the Royal Artillery, was the daughter of

Colonel Millett, and she leaves one son, who is at present a cadet at the Royal Military

Academy, Woolwich.

Source: The Times (London) Wednesday 18 February 1920, page 14 column B.

Henry Lancelot Tennant (1866-1933)

Obituary

Lieutenant-Colonel H. L. Tennant, O.B.E., late R.A., who has died after a long illness, was

born in India in 1866 and was the son of the late General Tennant, Indian Army. He served

throughout the South African War, and saw service with the Indian troops in the Great War.

He was married in 1897 to Miss Maude Millett, of Sweet Lavender fame, who died in 1917

116

[incorrect – should be 1920], and had one son. In 1921 he married the widow of Mr. A. S. B.

Oakley, of Chadlington, Charlbury, Oxon.

Source: The Times (London) Wednesday 15 November 1933, p. 9 col. D.

83. HENRY STANSBURY MILLETT (1867-1947)

Henry Stansbury Millett was the son of Henry Michell Millett (1845-1903) and Katherine

Elizabeth Stansbury (1842-1935), who married on 19 May 1866 at St Mary’s, Spring-grove,

London. Henry was born on 14 February 1867. He was educated at Rossall School,

Fleetwood, Lancashire, and the University of Cambridge. He was Barrister-at-Law at

Penpoll, Cornwall. He married Mary Frances Barnard (1867-1935) on 18 November 1903;

they had one child, Nigel Stansbury Girtin Millett (1904-1946). Henry died on 6 June 1947

at the Posada Hotel, Ajijic, Jalisco, Mexico aged 80, and was buried in the western part of

the cemetery in Ajijic.

Life and death

Admitted to St John’s College, University of Cambridge, 22 October 1887; Matriculated

Michaelmas Term 1887; B.A. 1890. District Auditor, Ministry of Health. Of 51 Beechcroft

Road, Oxford, England in 1840. Died at the Pasada, Ajijic, Mexico 6 June 1947.

Source: Cambridge University Alumni, 1261-1900.

Appointment

OXFORDSHIRE AUDIT DISTRICT

The Minister of Health hereby certifies the appointment to the office of District Auditor of

Henry Stansbury Millett.

31 March 1920.

Source: London Gazette 23 April 1920, p. 4737.

84. EDWIN RICHARD COLLINGWOOD MILLETT

(1874-1949)

Edwin Richard Collingwood Millett was the 4th child of Edwin Ley Millett (1836-1902) and

Blanch Collingwood (b. 1838), who married on 24 October 1866 at Rhyle, Flintshire, Wales.

Edwin was born on 13 April 1874, and was a farmer at St Just-in-Penwith, Cornwall. He

served in the Boer War (1899-1902). He married Letitia Maud Maunsell (about 1878-1923)

117

on 21 August 1905 at St Levan, Cornwall. They emigrated to New Zealand, where they had

three children. Edwin went to South Africa in 1923. He died in 1949 aged 75.

Inheritance

Edwin Richard Collingwood Millett, as only surviving child by 1 September 1900, after

serving in Boer War, returned to England, inherited Bosavern on the death of his Father in

December 1902, and sold it. ... He returned to White River (Witrivier, Mpumalanga), South

Africa in 1923.

Source: Millett, Iain. Millett of Penpol and Marazion.

http://www.iain.millett.btinternet.co.uk/millett_Story.htm.

85. HUGH WILLIAM MILLETT (1875-1967)

Hugh William Millett was the 8th child of James Halse Millett (1835-1890) and Harriet

Carnell (1845-1923), who married on 28 March 1862 at St James’s, Westminster, London.

Hugh was born on 6 November 1875 at 7 Winkfield Road, Wood Green, London, and was

baptised at Wood Green the following year. He married Gladys Kate Cole on 3 August 1915

at Hackney, London; they had one child, Hugh St Just Millett (1916-1992). Hugh died on 14

September 1967 at Minster, Kent aged 92, and was buried at All Saints, Birchington, Kent.

Life

Educated at Windsor Grammar School, Windsor, New South Wales, Australia. 1885 went to

sea in the Rothwell. In 1890 for apprenticeship of 4 years. Hauled ashore 1907 for career in

insurance broking. 1916 to 1919 RNR. Moved to Birchington, Kent, England in 1920. In

1923 bought “Clovelly” and in 1943 “Semaphore Cottage”.

Source: Millett, Iain. Millett of Penpol and Marazion.

http://www.iain.millett.btinternet.co.uk/millett_Story.htm.

86. MAURICE PALMER MILLETT (b. 1877)

Maurice Palmer Millett was the son of Maurice Millett (1853-1946) and Annanetta Julia

Pellett Palmer (1856-1949), who married on 21 November 1872 at Papakura, Auckland.

Maurice was born in 1877, and was a farmer at Rotorua. He married Emily Ada

McConaughy (b. 1879) on 28 December 1898; they had 4 children. He was adjudged

bankrupt on 3 October 1923.

118

Appointment

Appointed Postmaster and Telephonist, Ponga (near Papakura), Auckland, New Zealand, 1

April 1910.

Source: New Zealand Gazette no. 65, 30 June 1910, p. 1865.

87. MARTIN LESLIE MILLETT (1878-1951)

Martin Leslie Millett was the 1st son of Towers Trevorian Millett (1852-1882) and Kate

Leslie (1851-1921), who married on 20 February 1878 at St Stephen’s, Hampstead, London.

Martin was born on 3 December 1878 at Rajahmundry, Madras, India, and was baptised on

20 August 1879 at Free Church, Madras. He emigrated to Australia on the Loch Sloy in

December 1897, and travelled on to New Zealand. He died, unmarried, on 29 August 1951

at Te Kopuru (near Dargaville) aged 73, and was buried on 30 August 1951 at Mount Wesley

Soldiers’ Cemetery, Dargaville.

Chronology

1. 3 December 1878: born at Rajahmundry, Madras, India.

2. 20 August 1879: baptised at Free Church, Madras, India.

3. 5 August 1882: father Towers Trevorian Millett (1852-1882) died at Rajahmundry,

Madras, India. Mother Kate Millett (née Leslie) (1849-1921) and children George

Nicholls Millett (1880-1962) and Martin Leslie Millett (then aged 3¾) returned to

England.

4. Prior to December 1897: claims to have served three years in the 7th Middlesex (London

Scottish) Rifle Volunteers in London.

5. Prior to December 1897: claims to have been a cadet in the Royal Navy (discharged at

his own request).

6. Prior to December 1897: claims to have graduated BSc from the University of Glasgow.

(The University of Glasgow Archives Service has advised (email 9 May 2009) that they

can find no record of Martin Leslie Millett matriculating at or graduating from the

University of Glasgow).

7. 7 December 1897: emigrated from Glasgow to Sydney on the Loch Sloy:

Passenger lists leaving UK 1890-1960

Name Martin L Millett

Date of departure 7 December 1897

Port of departure Glasgow

119

Destination port Sydney

Destination country Australia

Age 19

Marital status Single

Sex Male

Occupation

Ship Loch Sloy

Master’s name Wade

Steamship Line Aitken Lilburn & Co

Where bound Melbourne, Australia

Square feet

Registered tonnage 1200

Passengers on voyage 6

The Loch Sloy was built in 1887 for Aitken Lilburn & Co, known locally as the

“Glasgow Loch Line”. She was a three-masted iron sailing vessel of 1280 tons. She

was subsequently wrecked on 24 April 1899 in Maupertius Bay on Kangaroo Island

(off Adelaide, South Australia) on a voyage from Glasgow to Adelaide and

Melbourne – 31 died, with only 3 survivors.

Loch Sloy

8. June 1903: enrolled in Feilding Mounted Rifles, promoted to Sergeant 24 May 1904 –

“raised the Apiti Troup and was in charge 3 years”.

9. 1907: transferred to the Heretaunga Mounted Rifles Volunteers (rank Sergeant).

Regularly participated in shooting competitions at Trentham for the Heretaunga Mounted

120

Rifles in 1909, 1910 and 1911. There are many newspaper references in this period and

later to civil actions taken against M. L. Millett for recovery of debts owed.

10. 1909-1910: instructor at training camps for the Dominion Scouts.

11. 21 October 1909: applied to join the New Zealand Defence Forces as “clerk or instructor

in the Mounted Rifle branch of the service”, but application declined as there were no

vacancies.

12. 10 February 1910: applied to join the New Zealand Defence Forces as an Instructor

Mounted Rifles. Then living in Lower Hutt. Gave occupation as civil and mechanical

engineer; and under the heading “Special qualifications for appointment sought” stated

“Have specialised in musketry, horsemanship, horsemastership and can manage men”.

Application is annotated: “This applicant is known to me – he is a very good N.C.O., but

is not good enough to specially recommend for the position he seeks. A. Bauchop, Lt.

Col.”.

13. 24 June 1910: advised that “owing to the higher qualifications of other applicants, you

have not been selected for appointment”.

14. 9 March 1911: applied to join the New Zealand Permanent Forces. Then living in

Wellington, employed by the Union Steamship Company. Stated that he was a member

of the New Zealand Volunteers.

15. 17 March 1911: appointed to the New Zealand Permanent Staff as Sergeant Instructor.

Employed as Area Sergeant-Major stationed at Lower Hutt in charge of Area No. 20,

Group No. 5, at a salary of £160 per annum.

16. March 1911: passed out of the Featherstone camp of instruction as NCO.

17. 31 July 1911: involved in unruly protest:

Medical Examination of Territorials. Trouble at Lower Hutt. Unruly Youths.

The medical examination of territorials in connection with the new Defence Act was

begun by Colonel Purdy at the Lower Hutt Drill Hall last evening. Some 200 youths

were summoned, mostly from Petone. These commenced early in the evening to

march to the destination, accompanied by tin-cans and various other noise-producing

articles. The numbers were supplemented as the march proceeded, and all joined in

singing and shouting. On arriving at Lower Hutt the crowd became rather unruly and

the sole officer in charge (Sergeant-Major Millett) was given a very trying time. He

was hooted and jostled and made the target of various missiles. The examination was

proceeded with, however, despite the difficulties, and the lot were put through after

some time. The demonstration was continued even then, but the lads eventually

dispersed, and wended their way home in a comparatively orderly manner. It was

evident, says an eyewitness, that the youths were out for an evening’s enjoyment, and

the affair could hardly be taken as a hostile demonstration against the provisions of

the Act. ...”

18. 6 August 1911: assaulted at Petone by “half a dozen roughs and severely handled”. A

medical examination showed 140 wounds in the body and a punctured wound in his

121

chest. Suffered severe blood poisoning, lung damage, atrophy of the chest muscles and

permanently weakened right arm, and was for a considerable time under the care of

doctors.

Territorial Office Injured. Waylaid and Assaulted.

Sergeant-Major Millett, of the Defence Department, stationed at the Hutt under the

new defence scheme was admitted to a private hospital last night. He states that on

Sunday night week he was waylaid at the Hutt by some young men, who beat him,

one of the party also stabbing him on the breast. He did not consult a medical man at

once, but after some days the wound became painful, and he placed himself in Dr.

Elliott’s hands. As there was a symptom of blood poisoning, Millett was removed to

a private hospital in Upper Willis-street. Millett states that the party which attacked

him consisted of six youths. He was in mufti at the time and was walking from

Petone to his home. The police have the matter in hand.”

19. November 1911: “Sergeant-Major Millett, who, since the inception of the defence

scheme has been in charge of the Hutt district, is about to be transferred to Dannevirke.”

20. 14 October 1912: returned to light duties, still on salary of £160 per annum.

21. 8 July 1913: collapsed with neuritis.

22. 31 October 1913: found to be physically unfit for further service on the New Zealand

Permanent Staff, and was retired on a retiring allowance of £7.5.0 per annum from 1

November 1913. On 26 February 1914 granted a compassionate allowance of £2 a week

from 1 November 1913 to 4 February 1915.

23. 13 May 1914: petitioned the Public Petitions Committee (M to Z) for refund of medical

expenses incurred.

24. 6 August 1914: applied to join the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, but was told he

needed to apply through a Group Office.

25. 31 December 1914: payment of £25 was approved for medical and other expenses

relating to his injuries in the attack on him (he had claimed £236.8.0, but had not obtained

receipts for most of his claims).

26. 20 May 1915: engaged as fitter at New Zealand Government Railways, Petone.

27. 1915: station hand, Pohuenui, Pelorus Sound.

28. 26 February 1916: commenced duty with the New Zealand Expeditionary Force; 7

March 1916 posted as Corporal; 18 April 1916 transferred to C Company 16th

Reinforcements; 13 May 1916 promoted to Company Sergeant-Major.

29. 21 August 1916: embarked from Wellington with the 16th Reinforcements, Canterbury

Infantry Battalion, C Company, New Zealand Expeditionary Force, on HMNZT 62

Mokoia (3,502 gross tonnage, owned by the Union Steamship Company of New Zealand,

Master Brown), bound for Plymouth, England via Cape of Good Hope. Arrived 24

October 1916 at Devonport, Devon.

122

30. 25 October 1916: “marched” [i.e. transferred ?] from 16th Reinforcements to 3 Platoon

C & O (Canterbury & Otago) Regiment at Sling Camp, near Amesbury on the Salisbury

Plain, Wiltshire. 27 December 1916 reverted from Sergeant-Major to Temporary

Sergeant:

“Non commissioned officers arriving [at Sling Camp] from New Zealand “went

down” one stripe, were placed in an instruction class, and at the end of their course sat

for an examination. If they passed the test they retained their reduced rank ...”

31. 30 March 1917: 4th Reserve Battalion C & O Regiment, promoted from Temporary

Sergeant to Temporary CQMS (Company Quartermaster Sergeant); 9 April 1917

promoted from Temporary Sergeant to Sergeant; 25 March 1917 qualified at Musketry

School on Hayling Island, near Portsmouth, Hampshire.

32. 4 June 1918: Headquarters NZEF (3 Platoon Canterbury Regiment), “relinquished

appointment of Temporary CQMS on marching out to Torquay and reverted to

substantive rank of Sergeant. Marched into New Zealand Discharge Depot (Torquay,

Devon) from New Zealand Infantry Reserve Brigade, Sling”.

33. 21 December 1918: returned to New Zealand on the HMNZT Tofua.

34. Period of service: 1 year 31 days in New Zealand (26 February 1916-20 August 1916, 22

December 1918-29 July 1919), 2 years 123 days overseas (21 August 1916-21 December

1918), total 3 years 154 days.

35. 29 July 1919: discharged as “no longer physically fit for War Service (peripheral

neuritis)”.

36. 1 April 1920: appointed Telephonist, Te Aruhe, Blenheim.

37. 1924: received the British War Medal, marking his war service overseas.

38. 29 August 1951: died (a bachelor) at Public Hospital, Te Kopuru (near Dargaville).

39. 30 August 1951: buried at Mount Wesley Soldiers’ Cemetery, Dargaville (Grave 54).

123

Sources:

1. Millett, George Bown. Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished), p. 139.

Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and

topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro, Netherton and Worth,

1890, col. 579.

2. Marriage Bible of Towers Trevorian Millett and Kate Leslie.

3. Millett, George Bown. Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished), p. 139.

Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and

topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro, Netherton and Worth,

1890, col. 579.

An index to the transcripts of monumental inscriptions in the burial ground at Madron

Parish Church. Truro, Cornwall Family History Society, 1996. 14 p. (Monumental

inscriptions of Cornwall).

4. Application to join the New Zealand Defence Forces dated 10 February 1910, in Military

record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 94. (Archives New Zealand reference AABK 18805

W5549, Box 27, 0081124).

5. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 7.

6. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 7.

Not listed in A Roll of the Graduates of the University of Glasgow from 31st December

1727 to 31st December 1897, with short biographical notes. Glasgow, James Maclehose

and Sons, 1898. 695 p.

7. Find My Past (http://www.FindMyPast.com).

8. Application to join the New Zealand Defence Forces dated 10 February 1910, in Military

record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 94.

9. Application to join the New Zealand Defence Forces dated 10 February 1910, in Military

record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 94.

Evening Post (Wellington) 1909-1912.

10. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 96-101.

11. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 106, 103.

12. Application to join the New Zealand Defence Forces dated 10 February 1910, in Military

record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 94.

13. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 166.

14. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 7.

15. Evening Post (Wellington) 16 March 1911, p. 8.

Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 8, 75, 163.

124

16. Evening Post (Wellington) 21 March 1911, p. 2.

17. Evening Post (Wellington) 1 August 1911, p. 7.

Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 128-129.

18. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 8, 36, 37, 59, 82, 129-130, 131.

Evening Post (Wellington) 15 August 1911, p. 8.

Grey River Argus 16 August 1911, p. 6.

19. Evening Post (Wellington) 2 November 1911, p. 6.

20. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 19, 75.

21. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 36.

22. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 8, 37, 82-83, 88-89.

23. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 28, 36-37.

24. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 32.

25. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 10-12.

26. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 9.

27. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 1, 137.

28. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 1, 4, 140.

29. Auckland War Memorial Museum Cenotaph Database

(http://muse.aucklandmuseum.com/databases/cenotaph/locations.aspx).

30. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 4, 140.

According to the Kippenberger Military Archive and Research Library, National Army

Museum, Waiouru, the C & O (Canterbury & Otago) Regiment was “a composite

regiment that included soldiers from both the Canterbury Regiment and the Otago

Regiment which were most probably responsible for administrative and command

functions such as discipline, welfare and training of the soldiers” (personal email

communication 17 April 2009).

Drew, H. T. B. The War Effort of New Zealand: a popular history of minor campaigns in

which New Zealanders took part, services not dealt with in the campaign volumes, the

work at the bases. Auckland, Whitcombe & Tombs, 1923, p. 249.

31. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 4.

.

32. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 4.

33. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 2.

34. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 1, 2.

125

35. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 1, 6.

36. New Zealand Gazette no. 61, 24 June 1920, p. 2032.

37. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 1.

38. Death certificate of Martin Leslie Millett.

39. Death certificate of Martin Leslie Millett.

88. GEORGE NICHOLLS MILLETT (1880-1962)

George Nicholls Millett was the 2nd son of Towers

Trevorian Millett (1852-1882) and Kate Leslie

(1851-1921), who married on 20 February 1878 at

St Stephen’s, Hampstead, London. George was born

on 29 August 1880 at Rajahmundry, Madras, India,

and baptised on 7 June 1881 at Madron, Cornwall.

He emigrated to New Zealand on the Delphic in

September 1900. He married Isabella Robertson

Fletcher (1881-1965) on 10 July 1902 at the

Presbyterian Church in Feilding; they had two

children, Charles Trevorian Fletcher Millett (1903-

1995) and Edward Tracey Fletcher Millett (1906-

1989). George was by occupation an engineer,

although he undertook a number of different jobs

during his lifetime, including being lighthouse

keeper on Dog Island in Foveaux Strait, off the

entrance to Bluff Harbour, from May 1908 to July

1909. He died on 5 February 1962 at Brown’s Bay,

Auckland aged 82, and was cremated on 7 February

1962 at Purewa Cemetery, Meadowbank, Auckland.

Chronology

1. 29 August 1880: born at Rajahmundry, Madras, India.

2. 7 June 1881: baptised at Madron, Cornwall, England.

3. 5 August 1882: father Towers Trevorian Millett (1852-1882) died at Rajahmundry,

Madras, India. Mother Kate Millett (née Leslie) (1849-1921) and children Martin Leslie

Millett (1878-1951) and George Nicholls Millett (then aged 2) returned to England.

4. 26 September 1900: emigrated from London to New Zealand on the ship Delphic:

126

Passenger lists leaving UK 1890-1960

Name Geo N Millett

Date of departure 26 September 1900

Port of departure London

Destination port Wellington

Destination country New Zealand

Age 19

Marital status Single

Sex Male

Occupation Clerk

Ship Delphic

Master’s name W Sowden

Steamship Line Shaw Savill & Albion Co Limited

Where bound New Zealand

Square feet 6338

Registered tonnage 8273

Passengers on voyage 270

5. 21 November 1900: arrived in Wellington:

DELPHIC, FROM LONDON

“Shortly after 10 o’clock this morning, the White Star liner Delphic, from London,

Plymouth, Teneriffe, Capetown, and Hobart, came to an anchorage in the stream,

where her passengers were inspected by the Health Officer, who found everything

satisfactory. As there were a large number of passengers on board to be examined,

the vessel was not berthed at the Queen’s Wharf until 12.20 pm. She left Plymouth at

2.41 pm on 29th September, sighted Teneriffe 4th October at 8.45 pm, passing the

island quite close, so as to signal “All well”. Fair weather was experienced to lnt

18.49 deg S, when a strong breeze and rough sea was encountered, which was met

with on and off until arrival at Capetown on 22nd October at 3.58 pm. The vessel

resumed her voyage next day at noon. Heavy swells and unfavourable weather were

encountered during the greater part of the run to Hobart, which was reached on 14th

November at 7.30 am. Having discharged cargo for Tasmanian ports and landed

passengers, etc, the Delphic left for Wellington on 16th November at noon. Fine

weather was met with for the remainder of the voyage.

She brought the following passengers for Wellington :–Third-class—Misses Barr,

Croft, Haddy, Hennessy, Ledbrook, Lee, Nyham, Wise, Wilson, Oldridge, Mesdames

Haddy, Wahren, Wilson and infant; Wise, Jonson, Captain M’Intyre, Messrs Cooper,

Craig (2), Foster, Gilbert, Gilbank, Haddy (2), Harbottle, James, Jay, Brosnan,

Ledbrook (3), Macpherson, Millett, Nyham, Potts, Pritchard, Palmer, Rowlands,

Stevenson (2), Spearing, Wise, Thornton, Walker, Wahren, Wilson, Keyes (2).

The voyage was uneventful, and no ice or wreckage was seen. The usual

entertainments were held at intervals. Particulars of her cargo have already been

published.”

127

Delphic

6. 31 December 1901: future wife Isabella Robertson Fletcher arrived in Wellington on the

Papanui, accompanied by her soon-to-be mother-in-law Kate Millett:

PAPANUI, FROM LONDON

“The New Zealand Shipping Company’s steamer Papanui arrived this afternoon from

London via Capetown and Hobart. She brought the following passengers for

Wellington:–First saloon–Rev Dewing, Messrs Mallalleu, Spencer. Second saloon–

Misses Elder (3), Hoddinot, Fletcher, Martin, Mesdames Elder, Jacob, Millett, Revs

Murray, Jacob, Messrs Dowson, Duxburg, Nicholas, Masters, Elder (3), and 31 thirdclass.

She has also 114 for all other ports. Three thousand six hundred tons of cargo

will be discharged at this port.”

7. 10 July 1902: married by Rev. Charles Murray at the Presbyterian Church, Feilding to

Isabella Robertson Fletcher (born 11 January 1881 at Granton Road, Leith, Midlothian,

Scotland, died 3 December 1965 at Remuera, Auckland).

8. Two children: Charles Trevorian Fletcher Millett (born 9 May 1903 at Wanganui, died

16 October 1995 at Takapuna, Auckland) and Edward Tracey Fletcher Millett (born 28

January 1906 at Wanganui, died 17 December 1989 at Takapuna, Auckland).

9. Occupation: Engineer.

10. 1903-1906: lived in Wanganui.

11. 1906: lived in Tauranga.

128

12. September 1906: moved from Tauranga to Mount Maunganui:

"Mr. and Mrs. G. N. Millett, who have been residing in Tauranga for some time past,

have decided to take up their residence in Mount Maunganui.”

13. 1906: ran launch service between Tauranga and Mount Maunganui:

“Launch Active

Leaves Wharf for the Mount daily, if sufficient inducement offers, starting at 10 a.m.,

returning 5.30 p.m. Seats 30. Adult’s fare 1s. return. Children, under 12, half fare.

Parcels and goods carried. Parties hiring privately, 30s. per day. G. N. MILLETT.”

14. 23 April 1907: rescued at sea:

“Yesterday morning whilst fishing off Wairakei in the launch Active Mr Millett had a

very severe seizure of the heart, which rendered him powerless to manage his boat,

and no one else being in the boat he was placed in a very awkward position. He kept

the engine going, but lying in a prostrate position could not steer the boat. Mr E. J.

Cullen, who was out in the yacht Gipsy, noticing a flag half-masted on the Active,

went to Mr Millett’s assistance, and made the Gipsy fast to the Active. A very heavy

sea sprang up, which parted the tow-line twice, and after considerable difficulty Mr

Cullen safely brought the two boats over the bar and anchored them in Pilot Bay,

where Mr Millett was taken ashore and attended to. Much praise is due to Mr Cullen,

and Master M. Keefe who was in the Gipsy with him, for their praiseworthy action in

rendering assistance to Mr Millett.”

Pilot Bay is in Tauranga Harbour.

15. 22 July 1907: passed examination for master of fishing boat:

“The following have successfully passed the examination for masters of fishing boats

under 5 tons, held by Captain Goertz, at Tauranga, on July 22 last:- ... G. N. Millett

...”

16. September 1907: installed engine in yacht:

“Last week Mr P. Murray had considerable alterations made to his large yacht by Mr

J. Brain. A 5 h.p. Zealandia engine was also installed in the vessel by Mr G. N.

Millett, engineer. The boat was given a trial spin on Friday and gave a speed of over

seven miles an hour. Mr Murray intends to use the vessel for fishing purposes.”

17. September 1907: disposed of launch Active:

“Mr Millet has purchased the launch Gladys from Mr Ferguson, having disposed of

the launch Active to Mr H. Tanner.”

“Mr Millett has disposed of his 10 h.p. oil launch Active to Messrs Beets Bros.”

18. October 1907: purchased launch Tarawera:

129

“Mr G. N. Millett has purchased from Mr J. Brain the well-known whale boat

Tarawera. The vessel is to be converted into an oil launch and is to be fitted with a

Price’s oil engine.”

19. 23 December 1907: left Tauranga for Auckland:

“Sailed. Dec. 23 – Aupouri, s.s., 463 tons, Haultain, for Auckland. Passengers: ...

Messrs ... Millett ...”

20. May 1908: entered Lighthouse Service. Posted to Dog Island, Foveaux Strait:

“Mr. George N. Millett, of Wellington, has entered the lighthouse service. He has

been appointed to the Dog Island station, vice Mr. Arthur, transferred to Ponui

Passage lighthouse.”

Dog Island Lighthouse

21. July 1909: resigned from Lighthouse Service:

“Mr. Garland has been appointed lighthouse keeper on Centre Island. He takes the

place of Mr. Tipene, who transfers to Dog Island in succession to Mr. Millett, who

has resigned.”

22. 24 August 1909: returned to Tauranga:

“Arrived. Aug. 24.-Waiotahi, s.s., 278 tons, Hopkins, from Auckland. Passengers:

Mesdames ... Millett and two children; ... Messrs ... Millett ...”

130

23. 1916: lived in Rotorua.

24. ? : lived in Opotiki.

25. 1934: lived in Tauranga.

26. 1949: lived in Paihia.

27. ? : lived on the Whangaparoa Peninsula, Auckland.

28. Early 1960s: lived at 10 Carlisle Road, Brown’s Bay, Auckland.

29. 5 February 1962: died in Auckland.

30. 7 February 1962: cremated at Purewa Cemetery, Meadowbank, Auckland, with ashes

scattered.

Sources:

1. Millett, George Bown. Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished), p. 139.

Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and

topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro, Netherton and Worth,

1890, col. 579.

2. Marriage Bible of Towers Trevorian Millett and Kate Leslie.

3. Millett, George Bown. Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished), p. 139.

Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and

topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro, Netherton and Worth,

1890, col. 579.

An index to the transcripts of monumental inscriptions in the burial ground at Madron

Parish Church. Truro, Cornwall Family History Society, 1996. 14 p. (Monumental

inscriptions of Cornwall).

4. Find My Past (http://www.FindMyPast.com).

5. Evening Post vol. 60 issue 123, 21 November 1900, p. 6

(via PapersPast, http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

6. Evening Post vol. 62 issue 156, 31 December 1901, p. 6

(via PapersPast, http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

7. Return of Application to Marry dated 9 July 1902.

Marriage Certificate of George Nicholls Millett and Isabella Robertson Fletcher dated 10

July 1902.

8. Marriage Bible of Towers Trevorian Millett and Kate Leslie.

North Shore Memorial Park Cemetery and Crematorium

(http://www.northshorecity.govt.nz/Services/OnlineServices/pages/IFCemetry.aspx)

131

9. Probate Record, Archives New Zealand Auckland Office: BBAE series 1570 box 1635

record 655/1962.

10. Inferred from birth place of both children.

11. Inferred from next entry.

12. Bay of Plenty Times (Tauranga) 3 September 1906, p. 2.

13. Advertisement, Bay of Plenty Times (Tauranga) 19 December 1906, p. 3.

14. Bay of Plenty Times (Tauranga) 24 April 1907, p. 2.

15. Bay of Plenty Times (Tauranga) 30 September 1907, p. 2.

16. Bay of Plenty Times (Tauranga) 25 September 1907, p. 2.

17. Bay of Plenty Times (Tauranga) 16 May 1906, p. 2.

Bay of Plenty Times (Tauranga) 27 September 1907, p. 2.

18. Bay of Plenty Times (Tauranga) 7 October 1907, p. 2.

19. Bay of Plenty Times (Tauranga) 27 December 1907, p. 1.

20. Evening Post (Wellington) 15 May 1908, p. 6.

21. Evening Post (Wellington) 6 August 1909, p. 6.

22. Bay of Plenty Times (Tauranga) 25 August 1909, p. 2.

23. Military record of Martin Leslie Millett, p. 1.

24. Michael George Millett.

25. Michael George Millett.

26. Michael George Millett.

27. Michael George Millett.

28. Brian Millett’s Brookes Extended FTM GEDCOM file.

29. Purewa Cemetery and Crematorium (http://www.purewa.co.nz/search.asp).

30. Purewa Cemetery and Crematorium (http://www.purewa.co.nz/search.asp).

Register Entry Number 5144.

132

89. ISABELLA ROBERTSON MILLETT (née Fletcher)

(1881-1965)

Isabella Robertson Fletcher was the first child of John

Gordon Fletcher (b. 1853) and Margaret Robertson (b.

1855), who married on 16 February 1880 at Dundee,

Angus, Scotland. Isabella was born on 11 January

1881 at Granton Road, Leith, Midlothian, Scotland, and

baptised on 3 March 1881 at Leith. She emigrated to

New Zealand with her future mother-in-law, Kate Leslie

(1851-1921) on 7 November 1901 on the Papanui,

arriving in Wellington on 31 December 1901. Isabella

married George Nicholls Millett (1880-1962) on 10 July

1902 at the Presbyterian Church in Feilding; they had

two children. She died on 3 December 1965 at

Remuera, Auckland aged 84, and was cremated on 7

December 1965 at Purewa Cemetery, Meadowbank,

Auckland.

Voyage to New Zealand

PAPANUI, FROM LONDON

The New Zealand Shipping Company’s steamer Papanui arrived this afternoon from London

via Capetown and Hobart. She brought the following passengers for Wellington :–First

saloon–Rev Dewing, Messrs Mallalleu, Spencer. Second saloon–Misses Elder (3), Hoddinot,

Fletcher, Martin, Mesdames Elder, Jacob, Millett, Revs Murray, Jacob, Messrs Dowson,

Duxburg, Nicholas, Masters, Elder (3), and 31 third-class. She has also 114 for all other

ports. Three thousand six hundred tons of cargo will be discharged at this port.

Source: Evening Post vol. 62 issue 156, 31 December 1901, p. 6.

(via PapersPast, http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

The Papanui

Built in 1898 by Wm Deny & Bros, Dumbarton, Scotland for the New Zealand Shipping

Company, the Papanui was a 6,372 gross ton ship, length 430 ft x beam 54.1 ft (131.06 m x

16.49 m), one funnel, two masts (square rigged for sail on the foremast), single screw and a

speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 34 1st, 45 2nd and 400 emigrant class

133

passengers. She carried a crew of 108. She was sold off in December 1909 after striking an

uncharted rock off the coast of Tasmania, Australia.

Papanui

90. LEOPOLD ARTHUR MILLETT (b. 1882)

Leopold Arthur Millett was the 10th child of John Nicholas Millett (1837-1918) and Maria

Tyson (1842-1920), who married on 11 April 1868 at Durban, Natal, South Africa. Leopold

was born on 25 February 1882 at Venayr, Lelant, Cornwall. During World War I, 1914-

1918, he served in the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry (Sergeant), Machine Gun Corps

(2nd Lieutenant), Machine Gun Corps & Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry (Captain).

Award of Military Cross

2nd Lt. Leopold Arthur Millett, D. of Corn. L. I. [Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry].

For conspicuous gallantry in action. He handled four machine guns, with great courage and

skill. Later, he continually visited his guns for 24 hours under very heavy fire.

Source: Supplement to the London Gazette 25 November 1916, p. 11541.

91. NIGEL STANSBURY GIRTIN MILLETT (1904-1946)

Nigel Stansbury Girtin Millett was the only child of Henry Stansbury Millett (1867-1947) and

Mary Frances Barnard (1867-1935), who married on 18 November 1903. Nigel was born on

23 October 1904. He was a writer, who used the pseudonyms Richard Oke; and, to 1946,

Dane Chandos (with Peter Lilley). Nigel died, unmarried, in 1946 at Ajijic, Jalisco, Mexico

aged 42, and was buried in the western part of the cemetery in Ajijic.

134

Name change

I NIGEL STANSBURY GIRTIN STANSBURY MILLETT of 105 Woodstock Road Oxford

in the county of Oxford (a natural born British subject) heretofore called, known, and

described by the name of Stansbury Girtin Millett do hereby give notice that I have

renounced and abandoned the names of Stansbury Girtin Millett and that I have assumed and

intend henceforth on all occasions whatsoever and at all times to sign and use and to be called

and known by the names of Nigel Stansbury Girtin Stansbury Millett in lieu of and in

substitution for my former name of Stansbury Girtin Millet and I also hereby give notice that

such change of name is formally evidenced by a deed poll under my hand and seal, bearing

date the 15th day of January 1937, duly executed and attested, and that such deed poll was

enrolled in the Central Office of the Supreme Court of Judicature on the 20th day of January

1937. —Dated this 22nd day of January 1937.

NIGEL STANSBURY GIRTIN STANSBURY (141) MILLETT, formerly Stansbury Girtin

Millett.

Source: London Gazette 26 January 1937, p. 596.

Mexican hotel

In 1938 an Englishman named Nigel Millett bought the Hacienda de Cuije building, an old

home that the Saenz family had built in the 16th century in Ajijic, and established the Posada

Hotel.

Source: Chapala area in the 19th and 20th centuries.

http://chapala.110mb.com/documentacion/linea/chapala/documentos/no%20cientifico

/centuries.htm.

Life and death

Nigel Stansbury Millett, the British author, arrived in Ajijic with his father in 1937. They

first lived in Casa Particular with the Heuers. Later they moved to Hacienda El Tlacuache

where Nigel quickly became part of the Ramirez family. Millett induced Mayor Ramirez to

change the name of his hacienda to Posada Ajijic. A few rooms and a bar were added and

under Millett’s management, an inn was born. ...

While living at the Posada, Nigel Millett wrote the award-winning Village in the Sun, in

collaboration with another Englishman, Peter Lilley. The book was published under their

pen-name of “Dane Chandos”. Millett died in 1946 and is buried in the western part of the

Ajijic cemetery, alongside his father. Peter Lilley lived in the house he and Millett had built

in the village of San Antonio for many years after Millett’s death. It was there that Lilley

wrote House in the Sun, which was also published under the name of Dane Chandos.

Source: Summers, June Nay. A brief history of Ajijic. Guadalajara-Lakeside v. 14

no. 12, August 1998.

http://www.chapala.com/chapala/ojo/backissues/august_1998.htm.

135

Grave

The grave of Nigel Millett lies in the village cemetery of Ajijic, at the western end of

Ocampo Street. The flat tombstone is largely covered with weeds and vicious nettles, but if

you brush away the dirt you can read:

Nigel Stansbury Millett

1904-1946

Author

Frolic Wind

(Richard Oke)

Village in the Sun

(Dane Chandos)

Source: West, Fred. Requiem for a minor author. Antioch Review v. 34 no. 3,

Spring 1976, p. 318.

Publications

As Richard Oke:

The boy from Apulia. London, Arthur Barker, 1936. 328 p. (A biography of Frederick II,

Emperor of Germany)

Frolic wind. London, Gollancz, 1929. 288 p. (Novel)

India’s coral strand. London, Faber & Faber, 1934. 262 p. (Novel)

Strange island story. London, A. Barker, 1939. 335 p.

Wanton boys. London, Gollancz, 1932. 287 p. (Novel)

As Dane Chandos (with Peter Lilley):

Village in the sun. New York, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1945. 260 p. (On Ajijic, Mexico)

136

92. MERVYN RICHARD OKE MILLETT (1910-1988)

Mervyn Richard Oke Millett was the son of Vernon

Leichardt D’Israeli Millett (b. 6 June 1881) and Olivia

Maria Ballard. Mervyn was born on 16 May 1910 in

Sydney, Australia. From 1934-1950 he worked as

Research Officer with the Commonwealth

Meteorological Bureau and part-time Lecturer in

Forest Meteorology at the Australian Forestry School,

Canberra, Australia. Mervyn married Margaret Eva ?

(1915-1982), known as Greta, on 22 February 1949;

they had one child, Charles. Following Greta’s death

on 14 June 1982 at Melbourne, Mervyn wrote With

Love For Ever, a pen portrait of his wife. Mervyn died

in 1988 aged 78.

Mervyn and Greta Millett

Publications

Australian eucalypts. Sydney, Periwinkle Books, 1969. Rev. ed. 1976. 112 p.

The climate of Canberra. Canberra, Forestry and Timber Bureau, 1946.

Epidermis of Eucalyptus spp. Canberra, 1945.

Evaporation and rainfall inside and outside a forest. Canberra, Commonwealth Forestry

Bureau, 1944. 16 p.

An example of the change of a forest site due to irrigation. Canberra, Commonwealth

Forestry Bureau, 1944. 12 p.

List of publications resulting from the work of Australian National Antarctic Research

Expeditions (to December 1964). Melbourne, Antarctic Division, Dept of External Affairs,

1965. 48 p.

List of publications resulting from the work of Australian National Antarctic Research

Expeditions (to December 1970). Melbourne, Antarctic Division, Dept of Supply, 1972. 85

p.

137

Native trees of Australia. Melbourne, Lansdowne, 1971. 112 p.

Paintings by Greta Millett. Melbourne, Spectrum Publications, 1987. 34, 97 p.

Pollen shed of monterey pine. Canberra, Commonwealth Forestry Bureau, 1944. 8 p.

Publications of the Antarctic Division, Department of Supply. Melbourne, Antarctic

Division, Dept of Science, 1972. 11 p.

Rainfall and increment of monterey pine in the Australian Capital Territory. Canberra,

Commonwealth Forestry Bureau, 1944. 26 p.

Some studies of the growth of Monterey pine (Pinus radiata). Part 1. Diameter growth.

Canberra, Commonwealth Forestry Bureau, 1941. 33 p. (With J. M. Fielding)

With love for ever. Tecoma, Vic., 1983. 125 p. (Biography of wife Greta)

93. MARGARET VIVIAN MILLETT (b. 1914)

Margaret Vivian Millett was the daughter of George Prideaux Millett (1863-1950) and Saidé

Russet Millar (1875-about 1970), who married on 23 September 1896 at Cheshire. Margaret

was born on 8 March 1914 at Rossett, Denbighshire, Wales. She married Jonkheer Ingolf

van Schuylenburch (1899-1964) on 21 January 1937 at St George’s, Hanover Square,

London; they had one child. They divorced on 27 August 1952.

Presentation at Court

Presented at the Court held by Their Majesties the King and Queen on Tuesday 12 June

1934: Miss Margaret Millett, presented by Mrs Joseph Temperley.

Source: The Times Thursday 14 June 1934, p. 22 col. D.

Mrs Joseph Temperley was Margaret Vivian Millett’s aunt, Mabel Elizabeth Vincent Millett

(b. 1867), who married first Joseph Temperley on 16 August 1887 at St Peter's, Earley,

Berkshire, and second Henry Edouard Strakosch (1871-1943) in 1941.

138

94. MILLETT FAMILY

Millett family are believed to be of French extraction. John Millett came to England in 1419

as ambassador and was a privy councillor in 1435. Henry Myllet probably his son d. 1505

and was bur. Perrivale, Middlesex, leaving issue by 2 wives 15 children.

Source: Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of

biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall. Truro,

Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 581.

Millett of Penpol, and Marazion. – The Milletts, were ranked among the most respectable

inhabitants of the town of Marazion, when in its early and flourishing state, particularly in the

time of Elizabeth, in whose reign, William Millett, was sheriff of the county of Cornwall.

Millett of Gurlyn.

Millett of Innis.

Millett of Bosavern, in St. Just. – This numerous family, is a younger branch of those before

noticed, but we know not the date of their separation.

Source: Gilbert, Charles Sandoe. An historical survey of the County of Cornwall: to

which is added a complete heraldry of the same, with numerous engravings.

Plymouth-Dock, J. Congdon, 1820. Vol. 2, p. 201-202.

Origins

Sir Humphry Davy's mother’s family was that of the Milletts. According to tradition it too

was of Norman extraction, and came over with the Conqueror; and according to another

tradition, at a much later period there were three brothers, one of whom settled in

Buckinghamshire, one in Middlesex, and the other in Cornwall. The records or written

notices of this Cornish branch, to which my mother belonged, do not extend back further than

the time of Elizabeth. It is stated by Gilbert, in his historical survey of Cornwall, that

William Millett, of Marazion, was sheriff of the county in the reign of the queen just

mentioned, namely, in 1556; and that Robert Millett, a naval officer, perished with Sir

Cloudesley Shovel, on the 22d October 1707, when shipwrecked on the rocks of Scilly; and

the belief of the family is, that he was the admiral’s secretary. In regard to rank, this family

may be considered as pretty much on a par with the preceding. It multiplied more, and was

more divided. There are now in the west of Cornwall three or four different branches, who

have nearly forgotten their common origin.

Source: Davy, John. Memoirs of the Life of Sir Humphry Davy, Bart. London,

Longman, 1836, vol. 1, p. 4.

139

Millett Family

Copy of original grant of arms, 1616

The name is an old one in England and is still older in France. In the English record it is

variously spelled. Mylet, Mylett, Myllais, Millet, Millett are among the early forms. The

name appears in the English records early in the fifteenth century. The differences in spelling

do not in the least signify any differences in origin. In England there always has been, and

there still is, the greatest freedom as to the spelling of one’s name. A person is at liberty to

write it as he chooses. Near relatives often have very different forms. All genealogical

authorities agree that the name, whatever its existing orthography, was originally the same.

In Middlesex there are Mylletts and Millets; in Hereford there are Myllets; in Cornwall there

are Milletts; and on the Island of Jersey the name is spelled Millais. These families are all of

common origin. The two artists, the late Sir John Everett Millais of London, and Mr. Francis

Davis Millet, the American painter, are from the same stock. And in all likelihood it would

be found that their lines run back to the same French ancestry as that of the famous painter of

peasant life, Jean François Millet. It has been supposed that the first of the name in England

came with William the Conqueror, and that this is indicated by the mural crown in the crest

of the arms allowed to John Millet of Hayes Court, Middlesex, in 1616. The first publicly

recorded instance of the name in England is that of John Mylet, who came in 1432 as an

ambassador from the regent of France, the Duke of Bedford, eldest uncle of Henry Sixth. It

is thought that he never returned to his native country. In 1513 one of the secretaries of

Henry Eighth was named John Millet. In 1516 the same name appears as that of a clerk of

the signet and also as a Letter of Exchequer, probably all the same person. Among the

earliest mentioned of the family are the Millets of Perivale, Middlesex. Henry Millet is

recorded as dying on Feb. 5, 1500. In 1575 another Henry Millet of that place was Lord of

the Manor of Cornhill. Though the name is so variously spelled it is noted that there seems to

have been endeavored to keep the original spelling on the monuments, in records of pedigrees

140

and of visitations in the Heralds College. The various branches of the family seem to have

radiated from Middlesex, Buckinghamshire, and Surrey. John Millet of Hayes, Middlesex,

was Lord of the Manor there in 1613. In 1616 the Arms “Argent a fess gules between three

dragons heads erased vert” was exemplified, that is allowed, to him, with the crest of an arm

armed, the hand grasping a dragon’s head. Arms of that description are held to represent

military distinction in opposition to tyranny, while the crest with the mural crown is

something granted for the taking of a walled city.

In Cornwall the Milletts were a prominent family. William Millett was sheriff of Cornwall in

1566. In Marazion and Penzance the Milletts were leading people. The mother of Sir

Humphrey Davy, whose monument stands in Penzance, was Grace Millctt. At Bosavern a

branch of the family lived in one house from 1627 to the present time.

The immigrant ancestor of the American Millets, or at least of that branch of the family

which immediately concerns this work, was Mr. Thomas Millet, who was born in England in

1605 and who, before emigrating to New England in 1635, married Mary Greenaway, who

was born in England in 1606.

Thomas Millet belonged to the Herefordshire branch of the family, his great-grandfather

being John Myllet, gentleman, of Redwood, near Leominster. His grandfather, also a John

Myllet, lived in Chertsey, Surreyshire, and here his father, Henry Myllet, was born. Henry

Myllet was attorney-at-law in Staples Inn, Holborn, and married Joyce, daughter of John

Chapman, of Chertsey. Thomas was one of six children and their third son. The immigrant

pair came to Dorchester, Mass., bringing with them a son, Thomas, born in England, in 1635.

The fact that his wife’s father, John Greenaway, had come to Dorchester in the ship Mary and

John two years before with his wife and four daughters, was probably the fact that induced

Thomas Millet to make his home in the new Bay Colony. With them also came Ursula

Greenaway, his wife’s sister, and the ship that brought them was the Elizabeth of London.

The place where Mr. Thomas Millet was born does not appear. But he brought a certificate

of his conformity from the rector of the Church of St. Saviour’s in South worth and was a

teacher in the church. He was straightway made a freeman in Dorchester, where he lived

until 1655, when he moved to Gloucester ...

Source: Stinchfield, John Clark. History of the town of Leeds, Androscoggin County,

Maine, from its settlement, June 10, 1780. Lewiston, Me, Press of Lewiston Journal,

1901, p. 41-43.

95. MILLETTS OF BOSAVERN

In Thomas Wolsey’s Inquisition, 1521, the incumbent of the parish [of St Just-in-Penwith]

was the Rev. Millett.

Source: Gilbert, Davies. The parochial history of Cornwall, founded on the

manuscript histories of Mr. Hals and Mr. Tonkin, with additions and various

appendices. London, J. B. Nichols and Son, 1838. Vol. 2, p. 282: “Parish of St. Just,

in the Hundred of Penwith”. (Citing Hals, William. The compleat history of

Cornwall, being the parochial history. Truro, 1750).

141

Millett of Bosavern, in St. Just. – This numerous family, is a younger branch of those before

noticed [i.e. Millett of Penpol and Marazion, Millett of Gurlyn, and Millett of Innis], but we

know not the date of their separation.

Source: Gilbert, Charles Sandoe. An historical survey of the County of Cornwall: to

which is added a complete heraldry of the same, with numerous engravings.

Plymouth-Dock, J. Congdon, 1820. Vol. 2, p. 202.

Among the chief landowners [of St Just-in-Penwith] will be found the names of Lord

Falmouth; Borlase, Millett, and Tremayne, Esquires.

Source: Polsue, Joseph. A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall,

compiled from the best authorities and corrected and improved from actual survey.

Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872. 4 v. Vol. 1, p. 302: “S. Just in Penwith”.

96. BOSAVERN

History of Bosavern House

The hamlet of Bosaverne was surrendered to King Henry VIII in 1514 by the Pendeen Estate,

as a direct result of Perkin Warbeck’s rebellion [of 1497 against King Henry VII], and

142

formed part of the Manor of Kelynack. (There has never been a recognised Manor, or Manor

House, at Bosavern). The land at Bosavern was presented to John Thomas – subsequently

referred to as Thomas Bosaverne – by King Henry VIII as a reward for Thomas’s services to

the King as a Sargeant-at-Arms.

Bosavern House was built in 1625. This is also the year in which the Bosavern family arms

were carved in wood over the old Bosavern Pew in St Just church. ...

John Bosaverne’s will of 1629 shows the House to have had the following rooms: Hall,

Parlour, Buttery, a little Study, Larder, Milkhouse and Kitchen, and five upper chambers.

There were also men’s and maid’s chambers.

The house was sold to the Millett family a few years later and was then owned by them and

their descendants for over 300 years. The Millett family became one of the principal families

of St Just and substantial land-owners. It is said that at one time they owned all the land

which could be seen from any of the windows of Bosavern House. ...

Source: Collinson, Corinne. Bosavern House: a brief history. Bosavern, 2006. 4 p.

Ownership of Bosavern

Bosavern was the residence of the family of that name in 1625. ... The property belongs now,

partly to J. N. R. Millett, Esq., of Penzance, and partly to Mr. Saundry, who resides there.

Mr. Millett’s part passed through the intermediate possession of the Pendarves family. Mr.

Saundry’s portion was sold, A.D. 1724, by Nicholls, of Trereife, to Thomas Allan, who

added to the house, and afterwards sold it to Mr. Saundry, the father of the present proprietor,

A.D. 1789.

Source: Buller, John. A statistical account of the Parish of Saint Just in Penwith in

the County of Cornwall, with some notice of its ecclesiastical and druidical

antiquities. Penzance, R. D. Rodda, 1842, p. 62.

The manor of Kalinack or Killenick was formerly very extensive, embracing several of the

adjoining farms, viz: Bosavern, Hendra, Dowran, Letcha, Bosorn, and perhaps other

tenements. ...

In the beginning of the last century the manor of Collinack or Killinack was in possession of

John Nicholls, by whose trustees it was sold for the purposes mentioned in his will. Mr.

James Millett became purchaser of one part, by whom it was again sold to Mr. George

Blewett in 1742, and by whose descendants it was conveyed to the present highly esteemed

Propietor, Joseph Carne, Esq., of Penzance, who has much improved the farm and the

village. To this gentleman I am indebted for this latter information. There is still one bed

room which had its ceiling a little ornamented, and over the chimney-piece are some

mutilated initials; an M is apparently that of a surname probably the James Millett mentioned

above: the date, 1691, is perfect. ... "

Source: Buller, John. A statistical account of the Parish of Saint Just in Penwith in

the County of Cornwall, with some notice of its ecclesiastical and druidical

antiquities. Penzance, R. D. Rodda, 1842, p. 59-60.

143

Edwin Ley Millett took title to Bosavern on the death of his father John Nicholas Richards

Millett in January 1885.

Edwin Richard Collingwood Millett, after serving in the Boer War, returned to England. As

the only surviving child he inherited Bosavern on the death of his father Edwin Ley Millett in

December 1902, and sold it.

Source: Millett, Iain. Millett of Penpol and Marazion.

http://www.iain.millett.btinternet.co.uk/millett_Story.htm

97. MILLETTS IN MARAZION

List of Mayors, Marazion Town Hall

In the eighteenth century wealthy families continued to live comfortably in Marazion. One of

the oldest, the Milletts, were there in the sixteenth century, and already prominent in the

144

town. Peter Millett was named as one of the capital inhabitants in the Charter of 1595.

Leonard, who died in 1740-41 was the son of Robert Millett, the secretary to Admiral Sir

Cloudesley Shovel, who was drowned with his master and many others when the Association

sank off Scilly in 1707. ...

A whole row of houses dating from the eighteenth century exists in North Street which might

well have formed the homes of the members of the families mentioned above and other

professional men and merchants in the town. It is not possible to say who lived in each house

but the Milletts, Cornishes and Coles all owned property there. ...

In 1800 there were still Cornishes, Coles and Milletts living in the town. ...

Source: North, Christine and Palmer, June (eds). The Charter Town of Marazion.

Marazion, Marazion Town Council, 1995, p. 26-27, 30-31, 32.

98. ENNYS

Ennis, usually called Ninnis, was for some time a gentleman’s seat, although it is now

become a mere farm. Mr. Humphrey Millett, the last resident gentleman, had been a member

of Exeter College.

The church is situated on a commanding elevation, and would be an imposing object

throughout the whole neighbourhood, if it were not disfigured by an insignificant spire. The

church and churchyard contain several monuments to the Godolphins, Pennecks, Milletts,

Bledwetts, etc.

Source: Gilbert, Davies. The parochial history of Cornwall, founded on the

manuscript histories of Mr. Hals and Mr. Tonkin, with additions and various

appendices. London, J. B. Nichols and Son, 1838. Vol. 2, p. 218: “Parish of St.

Hilary, in the Hundred of Penwith”.

Enys, or Ennis, sometimes called Ninnis, was for a considerable period a gentleman’s seat.

Humphry Millett, Esq., the last resident gentleman, had been a member of Exeter College. ...

Enys house was built in 1688.

Enys is now [1868] the property of the representatives of the late Humphry Millett Grylls,

Esq., of Helston, grandson of the above named Humphry Millett, Esq.

Source: Polsue, Joseph. A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall,

compiled from the best authorities and corrected and improved from actual suurvey.

Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872. 4 v. Vol. 2, p. 195.

Humphry Millett is believed to have built Ennys in 1688. The house still exists in 2002, and

has an inscription on the lintel “16 H + M 88”.

145

Source: Millett, Stephen Oram Fearon. Modified register for Peter Millett, 14

November 2005 (unpublished), p. 4.

Ennys House

99. GURLYN

Gurlyn is said by Mr. Lysons to have been the residence of various considerable families. It

has, for perhaps a century, been the joint property of Messrs. Gregor and Harris. About the

year 1760, Mr. John Millett, possessing a lease of this place for life, built an entirely new

house there; but the lease has been bought in by the gentleman seised of the freehold, and the

house taken down.

Source: Gilbert, Davies. The parochial history of Cornwall, founded on the

manuscript histories of Mr. Hals and Mr. Tonkin, with additions and various

appendices. London, J. B. Nichols and Son, 1838. Vol. 1, p. 365: “Parish of St.

Earth, in the Hundred of Penwith”. (Quoting Lysons, Daniel and Lysons, Samuel.

Magna Britannia: being a concise topographical account of the several counties of

Great Britain. London, Printed for T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1814. Vol. 3:

“Containing Cornwall”).

146

100. PENPOL HOUSE AND ESTATE

Penpol or Penpoll in the Parish of Phillack was one of the most important estates within the

area of the present town.

Records of the estate go back in 1584 when it belonged to the Godolphin family and was on

lease to the family of James Nicholls Esq.

In 1639 a quarter part of the estate was sold by Francis Godolphin to Anthony Moneychurch

of St. Erth. Nearly a hundred years later, in 1732, Penpol was in the hands of the Rt. Hon.

Henry Robartes, Earl of Radnor, who granted a 99 year least to the local merchant, John

Curnow.

On Curnow’s death in 1760 his daughter Jane, and her husband Richard Oke Millett, a

partner in the Cornish Copper Company, continued to live at the house. The lease was

renewed, and in 1788 the Millett family purchased the estate, then consisting of 27 fields, a

quay together with adjoining wastrel on the south side of the Hayle River, and 2/3rds of a

second quay.

Penpol was inherited by Richard Millett’s son John and subsequently in 1848, passed to the

youngest son of John’s second marriage, Hannibal Curnow Millett. He never resided at

Penpol and on his death the estate was inherited by his half-brother Dr. Richard Oke Millett.

This gentleman gained notoriety when he was accused by his brother-in-law, Dr. Edmonds,

of poisoning his half brother, Jacob Millett, by mixing aconite with horseradish sauce served

with beef for dinner. At the subsequent inquest and trial, Richard Millett was found not

guilty and acquitted with minimal damages. He never lived at Penpol again and on his death

in 1898 the property passed to his sister’s children.

In 1890 Christopher Ellis took out a 21-year lease on the house, with ten acres of land and

two fields. The estate was bought from the Millett family by Dr. Mudge in 1898 who

eventually sold the freehold to Colonel John Ellis in 1921.

Source: Manor houses in the Parish of Phillack.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~phillack/manor_houses.htm.

Mr. John Curnow purchased Penpoll, and resided there. His property became ultimately

divided between three daughters, one of whom married Mr. Robert [i.e. Richard] Oke Millett,

who succeeded Mr. Curnow at Penpoll, and has made it a handsome place. It now [i.e. 1838]

belongs to his son, the Rev. John Curnow Millett. Another daughter married the Rev.

William Hocken, the late rector of the parish: and the third married Mr. Parmenter from

Ilfracombe.

Source: Gilbert, Davies. The parochial history of Cornwall, founded on the

manuscript histories of Mr. Hals and Mr. Tonkin, with additions and various

appendices. London, J. B. Nichols and Son, 1838. Vol. 3, p. 343: “Parish of

Phillack, in the Hundred of Penwith”.

147

Penpol House

148

BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SOURCES

An account of the families of Boase or Bowes, originally residing at Paul and Madron in

Cornwall, & of other families connected with them by marriage. Truro, Netherton and Worth

for Charles William, George Clement and Frederic Boase, 1893. 298 col.

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=rC0AAAAAQAAJ.

Administration Report of the Madras Police for 1882. Madras, Government Press, 1883.

http://www.archive.org/stream/reportonadminis02deptgoog/reportonadminis02deptgoog_djvu.txt.

The Argus (Melbourne) no. 5214, Friday 20 February 1863, p. 4 col. 1 (via Historic

Australian Newspapers, 1803 to 1954. http://newspapers.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/home).

Auckland War Memorial Museum Cenotaph Database.

http://muse.aucklandmuseum.com/databases/cenotaph/locations.aspx.

Baring-Gould, Sabine. A Book of Cornwall. New edition. London, Methuen, 1906. 341, 40

p. http://www.archive.org/stream/bookofcornwall00bari/bookofcornwall00bari_djvu.txt.

Bay of Plenty Times (Tauranga) (via PapersPast. http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

Beavan, Charles. Reports of cases in Chancery, argued and determined in the Rolls Court

during the time of the Right Honorable Sir John Romilly, Knight, Master of the Rolls. Vol.

XX, 1854, 1855.—18 and 19 Victoria. London, Stevens & Norton, 1856.

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Biographical Etymology of Marine Organism Names.

http://www.tmbl.gu.se/libdb/taxon/personetymol/petymol.m.html.

Birmingham Daily Post (Birmingham) Tuesday 11 September 1888 (via British Newspapers

1600-1900).

Blewett v. Millett. In Brown, Josiah. Reports of cases upon appeals and writs of error

determined in the High Court of Parliament, 1702-1779. 2nd edition, with notes and many

additional cases, brought down to the year 1800, by T. E. Tomlins. London, J. Butterworth,

1803. Vol. 7, p. 367ff.

Boase, Frederic. Modern English biography: containing many thousand concise memoirs of

persons who have died between the years 1851-1900, with an index of the most interesting

matter. Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1892-1921; London, F. Cass, 1965. Vol. 5.

Boase, George Clement and Courtney, William Prideaux. Bibliotheca Cornubiensis: a

catalogue of the writings, both manuscript and printed, of Cornishmen, and of works relating

to the County of Cornwall, with biographical, memoranda and copious literary references.

London, Longmans, Green, Reader and Dyer, 1874-1882. 3 v.

http://www.archive.org/stream/bibliothecacorn00courgoog.

149

Boase, George Clement. Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and

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1904 cols.

Bray, Robyn. Ancestors of Bob and Robyn Bray. http://www.thetreeofus.net/5/128883.html.

Brisbane Courier (Brisbane) Friday 3 August 1877, p. 2 col. 7 (via Historic Australian

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British Library Integrated Catalogue.

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British Newspapers 1600-1900. Gale Digital Collections.

Brown, John Allen. The chronicles of Greenford Parva; or, Perivale, past and present. With

divers historical, archæological, and other notes, traditions, etc., relating to the church and

manor, and the Brent Valley. London, J. S. Virtue, 1890. 154 p.

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The Brownsville Flag (Texas) 23 June 1849.

Buller, John. A statistical account of the Parish of Saint Just in Penwith in the County of

Cornwall, with some notice of its ecclesiastical and druidical antiquities. Penzance, R. D.

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Chapala area in the 19th and 20th centuries.

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The Charter Town of Marazion. Edited by Christine North and June Palmer. Marazion,

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Chartist Ancestors: Chartism in Cornwall. http://www.chartists.net/Cornish-Chartists.htm.

Colburn’s United Service Magazine and Naval and Military Journal 1875, part ii, page 256.

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Cooper, Nigel (personal correspondence).

Cornish-L Archives. http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/index/CORNISH/.

Cornish Telegraph (Penzance) 2 October 1877, page 3 column 5.

Cornwall Record Office.

http://crocat.cornwall.gov.uk/DServe/DServe.exe?dsqApp=Archive&dsqCmd=Index.tcl.

Coulthard, Eric. Orua saga: an historical story of pioneering ancestors and beautiful

surroundings. Waiuku, J. E. Coulthard, 1963. 170 p.

150

Courier and Evening Gazette (London) (via British Newspapers 1600-1900).

Daily News (London) (via British Newspapers 1600-1900).

Daily Southern Cross (Auckland) (via PapersPast. http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

Davy, John. Memoirs of the Life of Sir Humphry Davy, bart. LL.D., F.R.S., foreign associate

of the Institute of France, &c. London, Longman, 1836. 2 v.

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=9tcDAAAAQAAJ.

Drew, H. T. B. The War Effort of New Zealand: a popular history of minor campaigns in

which New Zealanders took part, services not dealt with in the campaign volumes, the work

at the bases. Auckland, Whitcombe & Tombs, 1923. 276 p.

http://www.nzetc.org/tm/scholarly/tei-WH1-Effo-t1-body-d15-d2.html.

Edinburgh Gazette (Edinburgh) http://www.edinburgh-gazette.co.uk/.

English short-title catalogue. http://estc.bl.uk/.

The Era (London) (via British Newspapers 1600-1900).

Evans, Angela. Pengersick Castle: a brief history. Praa Sands, Out of Town Design and

Print, 1998.

Evans, Charles. Millett of Hayes, Middlesex. Notes and Queries vol. 208, November 1963,

p. 403-405.

Evening Post (Wellington) (via PapersPast. http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

Farrington, Anthony. A biographical index of East India Company Maritime Service officers

1600-1834. London, British Library, 1999. 886 p.

Find My Past. http://www.FindMyPast.com.

Freeman’s Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin, Ireland) Thursday 29

November 1849 (via British Newspapers 1600-1900).

Gay, Susan Elizabeth. Old Falmouth: the story of the town from the days of the Killigrews to

the earliest part of the 19th century. London, Headley Bros, 1903. 260 p.

Gentleman’s Magazine & Historical Chronicle (London).

Gilbert, Charles Sandoe. An historical survey of the County of Cornwall: to which is added a

complete heraldry of the same, with numerous engravings. Plymouth-Dock, J. Congdon,

1817-1820. 2 vols. in 3.

Gilbert, Davies. The parochial history of Cornwall, founded on the manuscript histories of

Mr. Hals and Mr. Tonkin; with additions and various appendices. London, J. B. Nichols and

Son, 1838. 2 vols. http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=F7TRAAAAMAAJ.

151

The Graphic: an illustrated weekly newspaper (London) 13 January 1877, p. 31 (via British

Newspapers 1600-1900).

Grey River Argus (Greymouth) 16 August 1911, p. 6 (via PapersPast.

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

The Guardian (London). www.guardian.co.uk/archive.

Henderson, Charles. Nicholas Boson and Richard Angwyn. Cornish-L Archives.

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High Sheriffs of Cornwall 1139-1899.

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Huntley, Dorothy Hosking. The Home Page of Dorothy Hosking and Dan Huntley’s

Families. http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/u/n/Dorothy-H-Huntley/WEBSITE-

0001/UHP-1074.html.

An index to the transcripts of monumental inscriptions in the burial ground at Madron Parish

Church. Truro, Cornwall Family History Society, 1996. 14 p. (Monumental inscriptions of

Cornwall).

India Office Select Materials. http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/indiaofficeselect/welcome.asp.

International Genealogical Index.

http://www.familysearch.org/eng/Search/frameset_search.asp.

Kennedy, Colin. Family Tree Maker genealogical file.

Kippenberger Military Archive and Research Library, National Army Museum, Waiouru

(personal correspondence).

Liverpool Mercury (Liverpool) (via British Newspapers 1600-1900).

Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper (London) (via British Newspapers 1600-1900).

London Chronicle (London) (via British Newspapers 1600-1900).

London Gazette (London) http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/.

Lysons, Daniel and Lysons, Samuel. Magna Britannia: being a concise topographical

account of the several counties of Great Britain. London, Printed for T. Cadell and W.

Davies, 1814. Vol. 3: “Containing Cornwall”.

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=ucU_AAAAcAAJ&.

Manchester Times (Manchester) Friday 21 January 1898 (via British Newspapers 1600-

1900).

Manor houses in the Parish of Phillack.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~phillack/manor_houses.htm.

152

Marriage Bible of Towers Trevorian Millett and Kate Leslie, 20 February 1878.

Melbourne Herald (Melbourne) 9 August 1859.

Military record of Martin Leslie Millett. Archives New Zealand reference AABK 18805

W5549, Box 27, 0081124.

Millett, Brian Richard Antill (personal correspondence).

Millett, George Bown. Genealogical Memoranda as to the Millett Family. Penzance, March

1870. 4 p. (Manuscript, unpublished).

Millett, George Bown. Genealogy Manuscript Book (Manuscript, unpublished).

Millett, George Bown. Millett Family Tree. 1 p. (Manuscript, unpublished).

Millett, Iain. Millett of Penpol and Marazion.

http://www.iain.millett.btinternet.co.uk/millett_Story.htm.

Millett, John Charles Brian. Family Tree Maker genealogical file.

Millett, John Lester Vivian. Yarns of an Old Shellback. London, Methuen, 1925. 159 p.

Millett, Stephen Oram Fearon. Family Tree Maker genealogical file.

Millett, Stephen Oram Fearon. Modified register for Peter Millett, 14 November 2005. 49 p.

(unpublished).

Millett, Towers Trevorian. Tiger shooting [extract from private diary, October-November

1873]. The Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales) Saturday 14 February 1874, p. 7.

Millett, Vincent Vivian. A Hampshire sailor in Devonport. Devon and Cornwall Notes and

Queries vol. 29, 1962-64, p. 227-230.

Millett Roots: Cornwall. http://roots.milletts.net/cornwall.htm.

Millett v. Millett. In Adolphus, John Leycester and Ellis, Thomas Flower. Queen’s Bench

Reports. London, William Benning & Co., new series vol. 11, 1850, p. 1037-1049.

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=CS4wAAAAIAAJ.

Milne, Benjamin Arthur. Historical Record of the 1st Cornwall, Duke of Cornwall’s,

Artillery Volunteers. London, Army & Navy Co-operative Society, 1885. 187 p.

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=e71nVhOb-MoC.

Mockler-Ferryman, Augustus Ferryman. Annals of Sandhurst: a chronicle of the Royal

Military College from its foundation to the present day, with a sketch of the history of the

Staff College. London, Heinemann, 1900. 318 p.

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=Qz0Vgse57YQC.

153

Morning Chronicle (London) Wednesday 30 November 1853 (via British Newspapers 1600-

1900).

Necessity for a Public Prosecutor. The Lancet 17 February 1866 (editorial).

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=L_0BAAAAYAAJ.

New Zealand Gazette (Wellington).

North, Christine and Palmer, June (eds). The Charter Town of Marazion. Marazion,

Marazion Town Council, 1995.

North Shore Memorial Park Cemetery and Crematorium.

http://www.northshorecity.govt.nz/Services/OnlineServices/pages/IFCemetry.aspx.

North Wales Chronicle (Bangor) Saturday 13 February 1864 (via British Newspapers 1600-

1900).

Northern Star (Leeds) 26 April 1845 (via British Newspapers 1600-1900).

O’Byrne, William R. A naval biographical dictionary: comprising the life and services of

every living officer in Her Majesty’s Navy, from the rank of Admiral of the Fleet to that of

Lieutenant, inclusive. Polstead, Suffolk, J. B. Hayward & Son, 1849. 1,400 p.

Officers died. http://glosters.tripod.com/offzdiedm.htm.

Otago Witness (Dunedin) (via PapersPast. http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

Pall Mall Gazette (London) (via British Newspapers 1600-1900).

PapersPast. http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz.

Paris, John Ayrton. The life of Sir Humphry Davy, Bart. LL.D. London, Henry Colburn and

Richard Bentley, 1831. 2 v. http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=e5oEAAAAYAAJ.

Pascoe, W. H. CCC: the history of the Cornish Copper Company. Redruth, Dyllansow

Truran, Cornish Publications, 1982. 202 p.

The Penny Illustrated Paper and Illustrated Times (London) Saturday 30 January 1897 (via

British Newspapers 1600-1900).

Polsue, Joseph. A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall, compiled from the

best authorities and corrected and improved from actual survey. Truro, William Lake, 1867-

1872. 4 v. http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=MBsiAQAAIAAJ.

Pritchard, Sandra and Pritchard, George. Sennen OPC: Mining in Sennen.

http://sennenopc.vingoe.name/mining.htm.

Probate records, Archives New Zealand.

Purewa Cemetery and Crematorium. http://www.purewa.co.nz/search.asp.

154

A Roll of the Graduates of the University of Glasgow from 31st December 1727 to 31st

December 1897, with short biographical notes. Glasgow, James Maclehose and Sons, 1898.

695 p. http://www.archive.org/details/rollofgraduateso00addiuoft.

Seamen’s crewlists, 1851: men on vessels registered in the ports of Cornwall. Compiled by

Liz Hore. Family History Indexes, 2002. (CD-ROM).

Sherborn, C. D. Fortescue William Millett. Geological Magazine series 6 vol. 2, June 1915,

p. 288.

The Shipwrecked Mariner (London) 1 May 1863.

St James’s Chronicle, or, British Evening Post (London) 21 August 1798 (via British

Newspapers 1600-1900).

Stinchfield, John Clark. History of the town of Leeds, Androscoggin County, Maine, from its

settlement, June 10, 1780. Lewiston, Me, Press of Lewiston Journal, 1901. 419 p.

http://www.archive.org/stream/historyoftownofl00stinrich/historyoftownofl00stinrich_djvu.txt.

Summers, June Nay. A brief history of Ajijic. Guadalajara-Lakeside v. 14 no. 12, August

1998. http://www.chapala.com/chapala/ojo/backissues/august_1998.htm.

Superintendent General Inwards Correspondence. Archives New Zealand Auckland Office

agency AP series 2 Item 18 records 1376/74 and 2070/74.

Supplement to the London Gazette (London) http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/.

Taranaki Herald (New Plymouth) 17 September 1859, p. 1 (via PapersPast.

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

Timaru Herald (Timaru) 13 December 1888, p. 2 (via PapersPast.

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz).

The Times (London) (via The Times Digital Archive, 1785-1985).

Trevelyan, George Otto. The life and letters of Lord Macaulay. 2nd edition. London,

Longmans, Green & Co., 1877. Vol. 1.

http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=RX13gIlGvO4C.

Troutbeck, John. Survey of the ancient and present state of the Scilly Islands… Sherborne,

Printed and sold by Goadby and Lerpiniere, 1794. 234 p.

West, Fred. Requiem for a minor author. Antioch Review v. 34 no. 3, Spring 1976, p. 318-

324.

West Briton (Truro).

Western Daily Mercury (Plymouth).

The Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales) (via British Newspapers 1600-1900).

155

Who Was Who 1897-2006. London, A & C Black.

Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/.

Wright, William Henry Kearley. West-Country poets: their lives and works: being an

account of about four hundred verse writers of Devon and Cornwall, with poems and

extracts. London, Elliot Stock, 1896. 488 p.

http://www.archive.org/stream/westcountrypoet00wriggoog/westcountrypoet00wriggoog_djvu.txt.

156

SUBJECT INDEX

Note: References are to biography numbers

Active 88

Actresses 82

Ageing, signs of 81

Ajijic, Mexico 91

Alma, Battle of, 1854 65

Ambassador of Regent of France 1, 94

American Milletts 94

Anglo-Sikh War, 1848-1849 59

Arms 2, 20, 94

Ashanti War, 1873-1874 65

Assaults 87

Bengal Civil Service 39, 40, 73

Bengal Native Infantry 59, 61, 68, 69

Bequests 11, 12, 16, 24

Bhutan 69

Bibliographies see Publications

Blewett, George (about 1714-1765) 10, 11, 20, 96

Blewett, John (1744/45-1776) 20

Body, retrieval of 64

Boer War, 1899-1902 84, 96

Bosavern 5, 10, 44, 64, 84, 94, 95, 96

Brasses 2

Bulleh, Punjab, India 61

Bulwer-Lytton, Edward Robert Lytton, 1st Earl of Lytton (1831-1891) 68

Canterbury Infantry Battalion 87

Canterbury Jockey Club, Christchurch 74

Chartists 44

Chess game 68

Chillianwallah, Battle of, 1849 59

Christchurch Yeomanry Cavalry Volunteers 74

Church monuments 2, 18, 20, 21, 24, 34, 52, 68, 69, 98

Coin collection 54

Companies, dissolution of 44, 67

Cornish Copper Company 22, 100

Cornwall Artillery Volunteer Corps 71

Council of India 39

Court cases 20, 44, 49, 50, 57, 63, 82

Court, presentation at 93

Cricket matches 82

Crimean War, 1853-1856 65, 66

Curnow, John (1697-1780) 22, 100

157

Davy, Sir Humphry (1778-1829) 23, 94

Delhi Zilla School, India 77

Delphic 88

Diamond 72

Dog Island lighthouse 88

Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry 90

Dunar War, 1864-1865 69

Dunkin, James 27

Dutch consul 24, 54

East India Company 25, 33, 36, 39, 46, 48, 68, 74

Edmonds, Frederick (1810-1885) 49, 100

Edmonds, Thomas Rowe (1803-1889) 50

Emeu 72

Ennys 15, 98

Fishing disputes 11

Fletcher, Isabella Robertson (1881-1965) 89

Foraminifera 60

Genoa, Fall of, 1814 38

Godolphin, Honor (about 1518-1579) 3

Gold Coast Protectorate 65

Great Work Mine 20

Griffith, Edward George 74

Gurlyn 99

H. E. I. C. see East India Company

H.M.S. Association 7, 97

H.M.S. Raven 35

Honourable East India Company see East India Company

Horse-racing 74

Horse-stable accident 74

Indian Forest Service 80

Indian Law Commission 39

Indian Mutiny, 1857-1858 61, 68

Inkerman, Battle of, 1854 65

Kelynack 10, 96

Kurwania Sota, Oude 59

Larceny 57

Le Grice, Charles Valentine (1773-1858) 34

Legal cases 20, 44, 49, 50, 57, 63, 82

Leslie, Kate (1851-1921) 78

Letter books 36

Libel 49

Life-saving 72

Lighthouse service 88

158

Lincolnshire 72

Loch Sloy 87

Lucknow, Relief of, 1857 68

Lytton, Lord see Bulwer-Lytton, Edward Robert Lytton, 1st Earl of Lytton (1831-1891)

Marazion Charter 4, 97

Marazion, Milletts in 97

Maritime service 25, 33, 46, 48, 62, 81; see also Naval service

Matamoras, Mexico 47

Medals 59, 65, 66, 72, 80, 87, 90

Memorial brasses 2

Mexican-American War, 1846-1848 47

Michell, Ann Emily (1804-1886) 42

Military service 59, 61, 65, 68, 69, 70, 87, 90

Militon, William (about 1515-1570/71) 3, 94

Millett, Ann (b. 1702) 14

Millett, Ann (née Sandys) (1724-1806) 18

Millett, Ann Emily (née Michell) (1804-1886) 42

Millett, Arthur Fenning (1841-1885) 73

Millett, Arthur Hill (1831-1879) 59

Millett, Caroline (1820-1821) 52

Millett, Cecelia (née Panormo) (b. 1823) 53, 56

Millett, Cecil George (1840-1865) 69

Millett, Charles (1792-1873) 36

Millett, Charles Frederic (b. 1838) 67

Millett, Claude Henry (1846-1924) 76

Millett, Edward (1801-1821) 40

Millett, Edward Waugh (1842-1886) 74

Millett, Edwin Ley (1836-1902) 64, 96

Millett, Edwin Richard Collingwood (1874-1949) 84, 96

Millett, Ellianor 13

Millett, Emmanuel 5

Millett, Ethel Maude (1867-1920) 82

Millett, Fortescue William (1833-1915) 60

Millett, Frederic (1798-1856) 39

Millett, George (1756-1816) 25

Millett, George (1793-1850) 37

Millett, George Bown (1842-1896) 75

Millett, George Nicholls (1880-1962) 88

Millett, George Prideaux (1863-1950) 80

Millett, George Thomas (1790-1824) 34

Millett, Grace (1708-1757) 11, 16

Millett, Grace (1750-1826) 23

Millett, Grace (1772-1868) 29

Millett, Hannibal Curnow (1776-1865) 30, 49, 100

Millett, Hannibal Curnow (1818-1881) 50

Millett, Henry Halse (1846-1877) 77

Millett, Henry Stansbury (1867-1947) 83

Millett, Honey (1809-1847) 46

Millett, Hugh Ley (1833-1879) 61

159

Millett, Hugh William (1875-1967) 85

Millett, Humphry (d. 1704) 15

Millett, Humphry (1723-1757) 17

Millett, Humphry (1744/45-1774) 20, 98

Millett, Humphry Davy (1818-1867) 51

Millett, Isabella Robertson (née Fletcher) (1881-1965) 89

Millett, Jacob Curnow (1813-1863) 49, 100

Millett, James (1647-1732) 7

Millett, James (1692-1743) 10, 96

Millett, James (b. about 1729) 19

Millett, James Halse (1835-1890) 63

Millett, Janet (née Webster) 55

Millett, John (1748/49-1815) 21

Millett, John (1752-1778) 99

Millett, John Boulderson (1795-1871) 38

Millett, John Curnow (1771-1848) 28, 100

Millett, John Curnow (1828-1870) 58

Millett, John George Mudge (1825-1865) 53, 56

Millett, John Lester Vivian (1865-1943) 81

Millett, John Nicholas (1837-1918) 66

Millett, John Nicholas Richards (1807-1885) 44, 96

Millett, Kate (née Leslie) (1851-1921) 78

Millett, Leonard (d. 1686) 6

Millett, Leonard (1692-1740) 11, 97

Millett, Leonard (1755-1841) 24

Millett, Leonard (1778-1798) 31

Millett, Leonard (1811-1860) 48

Millett, Leonard (1823-1881) 54

Millett, Leopold Arthur (b. 1882) 90

Millett, Louisa (1801-1871) 41

Millett, Margaret Vivian (b. 1914) 93

Millett, Martin (b. about 1756) 26

Millett, Martin Leslie (1878-1951) 87

Millett, Matilda (1805-1855) 43

Millett, Maude see Millett, Ethel Maude (1867-1920)

Millett, Maurice Palmer (b. 1877) 86

Millett, Mervyn Richard Oke (1910-1988) 92

Millett, Montague (1839-1901) 68

Millett, Nicholas Richards Broad (1809-1859) 47

Millett, Nigel Stansbury Girtin (1904-1946) 91

Millett, Peter (d. 1615) 4, 97

Millett, Philip Richards (1834-1871) 62

Millett, Richard (1791-1828) 35

Millett, Richard (1807-1865) 45

Millett, Richard Oke (1749-1832) 22, 100

Millett, Richard Oke (1815-1897) 49, 100

Millett, Richard Oke (1827-1897) 57

Millett, Richard Tracey (1840-1875) 70

Millett, Robert (1665-1707) 8, 94, 97

Millett, Robert (1694/95-1731/32) 12

160

Millett, Robert (1788-1844) 32

Millett, Robert Edward Michell (1840-1907) 71

Millett, Sydney Crohan (1836-1879) 65

Millett, Towers Trevorian (1852-1882) 79

Millett, William (living 1566) see Militon, William (about 1515-1570/71)

Millett, William (1690-1753) 9

Millett, William (1759-1791) 27

Millett, William (1789-1841) 33

Millett, William Halse (1840-1877) 63, 72

Millett Family 94

Milletts in Marazion 97

Milletts of Bosavern 95

Mooltan, Siege of, 1848-1849 59

Mounted Rifles 87

Murders 3, 14, 27, 49, 100

Musha, Oude 61

Mylet, John (living 1435) 1, 94

Myllet, Henry (d. 1499/1500) 2, 94

Name changes 91

Naval service 34, 35, 38, 56, 66, 76, 94; see also Maritime service

New Zealand Expeditionary Force 87

New Zealand Permanent Forces 87

Ninnis see Ennys

Obelisks 20

Oude 59, 61

Oudh 73

Paintings 31

Panormo, Cecelia (b. 1823) 53, 56

Papanui 78, 88, 89

Parish registers 7

Partnerships, dissolution of 28, 30, 32, 42, 63, 67, 74

Pengersick Castle 3

Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company 72

Peninsular War, 1807-1814 35

Penpol House and Estate 22, 100

Petrel 53, 56

Pirates 56

Poisoning 3, 49, 100

Police service, India 59, 68, 79

Posada Hotel, Ajijic, Mexico 91

Potatoes 66

Princess Amelia 25, 31

Privy Councillor 1, 94

Publications 20, 39, 41, 43, 44, 49, 55, 60, 65, 70, 73, 75, 81, 91, 92

Punjaub Cavalry 61

Punjaub Infantry 59

161

Rogers, Henry (d. 1735) 14

Royal Artillery 70

Royal East India Volunteers 25

Royal Welsh Fusiliers 65

Rumpa Disturbances, 1879-1880 79

Salvers 45

Sandys, Ann (1724-1806) 18

Scientific names 60

Scilly, Isles of 8, 94, 97

Sea rescues 72, 88

Sebastopol, Siege of, 1854-1855 45, 65

Sheriffs of Cornwall 3, 94

Shipwrecks 7, 72, 94

Shovel, Sir Cloudesley (about 1650-1707) 8, 94, 97

Skewis 14

Smugglers 27

Songs 75

St Just-in-Penwith, Vicar of 7

Suicides 45

Supreme Council of India 39

Tennant, Ethel Maude (née Millett) 82

Tennant, Henry Lancelot (1866-1933) 82

Tiger shooting 79

Tin bounds 9

Tin mines 20

Tonkin, John 17, 23

Trevarthian 29

Trewen 28

Vawdrey, George (1806-1872) 49

Waiotahi District Board, Grahamstown, Thames 64

Webster, Janet 55

Wedding rings 7

Wills 5, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 20, 35, 50, 63, 74, 96

Woundings 35, 65

Wrecks 7, 72

Yarra Yarra 72