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de Mellet Family
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Rarere Road, Takapuna: a Brief History



MILLETT

 

OF BOSAVERN AND MARAZION

 

 

 

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES

 

 

 

Second Revised Edition

 

 

 

Tony Millett

 

tony.millett@xtra.co.nz

 

 

 

 

 

May 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONTENTS

 

 

Introduction

 

  1.      John Mylet  (living 1435)

  2.      Henry Myllet  (d. 1500)

  3.      William Milliton (about 1515-1571)

  4.       Henry Millett  (b. about 1570)

  5.      Peter Millett  (d. 1615)                                               

  6.       Humphry Millett  (1630-1704)

  7.       Martin Millett  (about 1630-1723)

  8.      Leonard Millett  (d. 1686)

  9.      James Millett  (1647-1732)

10.      Emmanuel Millett

11.      Robert Millett  (1665-1707?)

12.       Ellianor Millett

13.      William Millett  (1690-1753)

14.       Leonard Millett  (1692-1740)

15.       James Millett  (1692-1743)

16.       Robert Millett  (1695-1732)

17.       Ann Millett  (1702-1738)

18.       Grace Millett  (1708-1757)

19.       Humphry Millett  (1723-1757)

20.       Ann Millett (née Sandys)  (1724-1806)

21.       James Millett  (b. about 1729)

22.       Humphry Millett  (1745-1774)

23.       John Millett  (1749-1815)

24.       Richard Oke Millett  (1749-1832)

25.       Grace Millett  (1750-1826)

26.       Leonard Millett  (1755-1841)                                                 

27.       Martin Millett  (about 1756-1836)

28.       Sampson Millett  (1757-1794)

29.       William Millett  (1759-1791)

30.       George Millett (1762-1816)

31.       Richard Millett  (1770-1826)

32.       John Curnow Millett  (1771-1848)

33.       Richard Oke Millett  (1772-1819)

34.       Grace Millett  (1772-1868)

35.       William Millett  (1774-1829)

36.       Hannibal Curnow Millett  (1776-1865)

37.       Leonard Millett  (1778-1798)

38.       Robert Millett  (1788-1844)

39.       William Millett  (1789-1841)

40.       George Thomas Millett  (1790-1824)

41.       Richard Millett  (1791-1828)

42.       John Boulderson Millett  (1791-1870)

43.       Charles Millett  (1792-1873)

44.       George Millett  (1793-1850)

45.       Henry Millett  (1795-1834)

46.       Frederic Millett  (1798-1856)

47.       Louisa Millett  (1801-1871)

48.       Edward Millett  (1801-1821)

49.       Ann Emily Millett (née Michell)  (1804-1886)

50.       Matilda Millett  (1805-1855)

51.       Richard Millett  (1807-1865)

52.       William John Honey Millett  (1807-1881)

53.       John Nicholas Richards Millett  (1807-1885)

54.       Nicholas Richards Broad Millett  (1809-1859)

55.       Honey Millett  (1809-1847)

56.       Leonard Millett  (1811-1860)

57.       Thomas Samuel Millett  (1813-1879)

58.       Richard Oke Millett  (1815-1897)

59.       William Smith Millett  (1818-1854)

60.       Humphry Davy Millett  (1818-1867)

61.       Hannibal Curnow Millett  (1818-1881)

62.       Caroline Millett  (1820-1821)

63.       Janet Millett (née Webster)  (1821-1904)

64.       Leonard Millett  (1823-1881)

65.       Cecelia Millett (née Panormo)  (1823-1907)

66.       John George Mudge Millett  (1825-1865)

67.       Richard Oke Millett  (1827-1893)

68.       John Curnow Millett  (1828-1870)

69.       Arthur Hill Millett  (1831-1879)

70.       John Millett  (1832-1867)

71.       Fortescue William Millett  (1833-1915)

72.       Hugh Ley Millett  (1833-1879)

73.       Philip Richards Millett  (1834-1871)

74.       James Halse Millett  (1835-1890)

75.       Sydney Crohan Millett  (1836-1879)

76.       Edwin Ley Millett  (1836-1902)

77.       John Nicholas Millett  (1837-1918)

78.       Charles Frederic Millett  (1838-1917)

79.       Henry Millett  (1839-1916)

80.       Montague Millett  (1839-1901)

81.       William Halse Millett  (1840-1877)

82.       Robert Edward Michell Millett  (1840-1907)

83.       Richard Tracey Millett  (1840-1875)

84.       Cecil George Millett  (1840-1865)

85.       Arthur Fenning Millett  (1841-1885)

86.       Edward Waugh Millett  (1842-1886)

87.       George Bown Millett  (1842-1896)

88.       Anne Nicholls Louisa Millett  (1844-1925)

89.       Henry Halse Millett  (1846-1877)

90.       Claude Henry Millett  (1846-1924)

91.       Reginald Millett  (1847-1886)

92.       Kate Millett (née Leslie)  (1851-1921)

93.       Towers Trevorian Millett  (1852-1882)

94.       Maurice Millett  (1853-1946)

95.       Walter Millett  (1854-1901)

96.       Sarah Matilda Millett  (1855-1940)

97.       Elizabeth Mary Leslie  (1857-1940)

98.       John Edwin George Millett  (1859-1921)

99.       Lucy Constance Marion Millett  (1862-1950)

100.     George Prideaux Millett  (1863-1950)

101.     Humphry Davy Millett  (1865-1926)

102.     John Lester Vivian Millett  (1865-1943)

103.     Henry Stansbury Millett  (1867-1947)

104.     Ethel Maude Millett  (1867-1920)

104a.   Henry Lancelot Tennant  (1866-1933)

105.     Cornish Collins Tyson Millett  (1871-1947)

106.     Edwin Richard Collingwood Millett  (1874-1956)

107.     William Hugh Millett  (1875-1967)

108.     Maurice Palmer Millett  (1877-1948)

109.     Martin Leslie Millett  (1878-1951)

110.     George Nicholls Millett  (1880-1962)

111.     Isabella Robertson Millett (née Fletcher)  (1881-1965)

112.     Leonard Stanley Millett  (1881-1950)

113.     Vernon Leichhardt D’Israeli Millett  (1881-1937)

114.     Leopold Arthur Millett  (1882-1931)

115.     Alfred Clyde Millett  (1884-1910)

116.     Humphry John Curnow Millett  (1897-1987)

117.     Marjorie Helen Millett  (b. 1899)

118.     Charles Trevorian Fletcher (Charlie) Millett  (1903-1995)

119.     Nigel Stansbury Girtin Stansbury Millett  (1904-1946)                                          

120.     Edward Tracey Fletcher (Ted) Millett  (1906-1989)

121.     Mary Blanche (Molly) Millett  (1908-2006)

122.     Mervyn Richard Oke Millett  (1910-1988)

123.     Margaret Vivian Millett  (1914-2017)

124.     Guy Neville Millett  (1917-1918)

125.     Leopold Ian Adrian Millett  (1920-2010)

126.     Vincent Vivian Millett  (1928-2013)

127.     Millett Family

128.     Milletts of Bosavern

129.     Bosavern

130.     Milletts in Marazion

131.     Ennys

132.     Gurlyn

133.     Penpol House and Estate

134.     Wheal Millett Mine

 

Bibliography of Sources

Subject Index                                                                                                 

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION 

 

 

As a genealogist I am, of course, vitally interested in “hatched, matched and dispatched” information.  But as a family historian (albeit an amateur one) I am far more interested in the lives of my forebears – who they were, what they did, and where they did it.  I have therefore spent considerable time researching my ancestors, in libraries, via the Internet, using newspapers, books, journals and websites etc.  All that I have found out has been entered into my two family trees, Millett of Bosavern and Millett of Marazion, both in my own Family Tree Maker files but also, more publicly, on Ancestry.com with links from my website.  However, this information is not easily findable, as it usually requires knowledge of the name of the person to whom the information or “story” has been attached.

 

This publication is intended to assist in making the information I have discovered more easily accessible.  The “stories” are still recorded under the names of the persons to whom they relate, but a broad subject index has been provided to assist retrieval.  The entries are arranged chronologically by birth date.

 

All information is sourced, and a bibliography of the sources quoted is provided.

 

The Milletts included in this publications are only a tiny proportion of those listed in my two family trees, being restricted to those about whom I have been able to discover some interesting fact or account beyond birth, baptism, marriage, occupation, death and burial data.  This second revised edition adds 33 new biographies, plus additional information and “stories” for the 94 Milletts recorded in the first edition published in February 2011.

 

 

Tony Millett                                                                                      

 

10 O’Neills Avenue

Takapuna, Auckland

New Zealand 0622                                                     

 

Email:      tony.millett@xtra.co.nz

Website:   http://tonymillett.tripod.com

 

 

May 2017

 

Note: The Web version of this publication omits illustrations, which are given in a separate file on my website:  Images for “Biographical Notes”.

 

 

 

 

1.    JOHN MYLET  (living 1435)

Millett of Marazion

 

John Millett came to England from France in 1419 as Ambassador and was a Privy Councillor in 1435.

 

Source:  Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 581.

 

 

John Mylet came to England in 1432 as an ambassador from John of Lancaster, First Duke of Bedford (1389-1435), son of King Henry IV and Regent of France for his nephew King Henry VI, who was technically also heir to the throne of France.  It was agreed that 40 marks should be paid to the ambassador from the Duke of Bedford.  See Proceedings and Ordinances of the Privy Council of England.

 

Sources:

Millett, George Bown.  Genealogical Memoranda as to the Millett Family.  Penzance, March 1870 (manuscript), p. 1.

Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_of_Lancaster,_1st_Duke_of_Bedford.

 

 

The first publicly recorded instance of the [Millett] name in England is that of John Mylet, who came in 1432 as an ambassador from the regent of France, the Duke of Bedford, eldest uncle of Henry Sixth.  It is thought that he never returned to his native country.

 

Source:  Stinchfield, John Clark.  History of the town of Leeds, Androscoggin County, Maine, from its settlement, June 10, 1780.   Lewiston, Me, Press of Lewiston Journal, 1901, p. 42.  https://archive.org/details/historyoftownofl00stinrich.

 

 

 

 

2.    HENRY MYLLET  (d. 1500)

Millett of Marazion

 

Henry Myllet was the son of John Mylet (living 1435).  Henry lived at Perivale or Greenford Parva, Middlesex.  He married first Alice ?, and second Johanna ?.   Henry died on 5 February 1500 at Perivale, and was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church, Perivale.

 

 

Children

 

Henry Myllet had 3 sons and 6 daughters by his first wife Alice, and 3 sons and 3 daughters by his second wife Johanna.

 

Source:  Millett, George Bown.  Genealogical Memoranda as to the Millett Family.  Penzance, March 1870 (manuscript), p. 1.

 

 

Death

 

Henry Myllet, probably son of John Millett, died 1505 [i.e. 1500] and was buried Perivale, Middlesex, leaving issue by 2 wives 15 children.

 

Source:  Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 581.

 

 

Memorial brasses

 

Some of the monuments in the church [at Perivale] have already been referred to, the most ancient of these being the brasses to the memory of Henry Mylett, his two wives and fifteen children;  it bears the date a.d. 1500.  There are in all five small brasses in good preservation.

 

The centre one is the figure of Mylett, with that of his wife, Alice, on one side and Joan on the other;  beneath which are the presentments, on separate brasses, of the three sons and six daughters of the former, and the three sons and three daughters of the latter.  The engraved detail of all the figures is well preserved, and the costumes of the period (Henry VII.) are so well shown as to render the monument of great interest.  A brass plate is inserted between the two groups of figures, which contains the following partly obliterated inscription : —

 

“Orate pro anibus Henrici Mylett ac Alicise et Johannse Uxor sua ; qui quidem Henricus obiit V die Februar. Anno dom millia VO. quorum anibas [(?)] p.pioietur Deus — ame.”

 

The brasses are on the floor near the altar railing.

 

Source:  Brown, John Allen.  The chronicles of Greenford Parva; or, Perivale, past and present.  With divers historical, archæological, and other notes, traditions, etc., relating to the church and manor, and the Brent Valley.  London, J. S. Virtue, 1890, p. 78.  https://archive.org/details/chroniclesofgree00browrich.

 

 

Descendants

 

Henry Millett was several times constable of Perivale (Greenford Parva). ... From Henry Millett descended the family of Millett of Perivale, who seem to have come to an end with Elizabeth Millett, of Perivale, who died 20 April, 1655, at Agmondisham, Bucks.  She married first Sir Thomas Knightley, and secondly John Lane, of the Inner Temple;  and her monument at Perivale shows the Millett arms:  argent, a fess gules between three dragons heads erased vert.

 

Now these very same arms had been granted in 1616 to John Millett, of Hayes Court, the elder brother of Richard Millett, of Denham, Bucks., who died in 1638.  So it seems probable that the Millett of Hayes were a branch of the Perivale family, and descended from one of the sons of Henry Millett, who died in 1500.  One of these sons was probably John Millett, Clerk of the King’s Signet (see The Armorial, iii (1962) p. 160).

 

Source:  Evans, Charles.  Millett, of Hayes, Middlesex.  Notes and Queries v. 208, November 1963, p. 403.

 

 

 

 

3.    WILLIAM MILLITON  (about 1515-1571)

Millett of Marazion

 

Family tradition, and several sources, suggest that William Millett was Sheriff of Cornwall in 1566.   However, a number of lists of sheriffs of Cornwall state that William Militon was High Sheriff in 1566.

 

William Milliton (the surname is also spelt Meliton, Melton, Milaton, Mileton, Militon, Millaton, Milleton, Milynton, Millyton, Myliton and Myllyton) was the son of John (or Job) Myliton (or Militon, Milliton or Myllyton) (1483-1549) and Alice (or Avice) Dennis (or Dennys) (about 1493- 1551), who married in 1514 at Bicton, Devon.  William was born about 1515 in Breage, Cornwall.  He resided at Pengersick Castle, Breage.  He married Honor Godolphin (about 1518-1579) in 1537 at Godolphin;  between 1538 and 1554 they had 9 children – 8 girls and 1 boy.  William was Captain of St Michael’s Mount, and High Sheriff of Cornwall in 1566.  He died on 18 March 1571 at Breage aged 56, and was buried there on 20 March 1571.

 

William’s only son, William Milliton, was born about 1554.  He died, unmarried, at sea on 31 May 1571 aged 17, and was buried on 1 June 1571 at Hartland, Devon.  His father William, therefore, was without male issue.

 

 

Sheriff of Cornwall

 

William Millett, Sheriff of Cornwall, eighth year of the Reign of Elizabeth, 1566.

 

           Source:  Millett, George Bown.  Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished), p. 100.

 

William Millett was sheriff of Cornwall in 1566.

 

Source:  Stinchfield, John Clark.  History of the town of Leeds, Androscoggin County, Maine, from its settlement, June 10, 1780.   Lewiston, Me, Press of Lewiston Journal, 1901, p. 42.

https://archive.org/details/historyoftownofl00stinrich.

 

One William Millett was Sheriff of the county in the reign of Elizabeth

 

Source:  Gay, Susan Elizabeth.  Old Falmouth: the story of the town from the days of the Killigrews to the earliest part of the 19th century.  London, Headley Bros, 1903, p. 197.  https://archive.org/details/oldfalmouth00gays.

 

It is said that a William Millett of Marazion was High Sheriff of Cornwall in 1566.  He is shown on Richard Oke Millett's family tree of 1888 with a date of 1558.

 

Source:  Millett Roots: Cornwall.  http://roots.milletts.net/cornwall.htm.

 

William Millett of Marazion was High Sheriff of Cornwall in 1566.

 

Source:  Millett, Iain.  Millett of Penpol and Marazion. http://www.iain.millett.btinternet.co.uk/millett_Story.htm.

 

1566:  William Militon of Pengersick.

 

Source:  High Sheriffs of Cornwall: a chronological list.  Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Sheriff_of_Cornwall#16th-century_Sheriffs.

 

16 November 1565-18 November 1566:  William Mylliton.

 

Source:  List of sheriffs for England and Wales from the earliest times to A.D. 1831.  London, HMSO, 1898, p. 23.  (Public Record Office. Lists and indexes, no. 9).  https://archive.org/stream/listofsheriffsfo00newy#page/22/mode/2up/search/Cornwall.

 

 

Millaton Family

 

Near Germoe, but nearer the sea, is the very fine remnant of a castle, Pengersick.  It was erected in the reign of Henry VIII by a certain man of the name of Millaton, probably of Millaton in Bridestowe, Devon.  He had committed a murder, and to escape justice he fled his native county and concealed himself in the dip of the land facing the sea at Pengersick, where he constructed a tower amply provided with means of defence.  The basement is furnished with loopholes for firing upon anyone approaching, and above the door is a shoot for melted lead.  The whole building is beautifully constructed.

 

Here Millaton remained in concealment till he died, never leaving his tower for more than a brief stroll.  The land had not been purchased in his own name, but in that of his son Job, who, after his death, was made Governor of S. Michael’s Mount.  Job had a son, William, who was made Sheriff of Cornwall in 1565, and he married Honor, daughter of Sir William Godolphin of Godolphin.

 

According to a local legend, William Millaton and his wife Honor lived a cat-and-dog life.  They hated each other with a deadly hate, and at length each severally resolved that this incompatible union must come to an end.

 

William Millaton said to his wife, “Honor, we have lived in wretchedness too long.  Let us resolve on a reconciliation, forget the past, and begin a new life”.

 

“Most certainly do I agree thereto”, said she.

 

“And”, continued William, “as a pledge of our reunion, let us have a feast together to-night”.

 

So a banquet was spread in Pengersick Castle for them twain and none others.

 

And when they had well eaten, then William Millaton said, “Let us drink to our reunion”.

 

“I will drink if you will drink”, said she.

 

Then he drained his glass, and after that, she drained hers.

 

With a bitter laugh she said, “William, you have but three minutes to live.  Your cup was poisoned”.

 

“And you”, retorted he, “have but five, for yours is poisoned”.

 

“It is well,” said Honor; “I am content.  I shall have two minutes in which to triumph over your dead carcass, and to spurn it with my foot”.

 

On the death of this William, the estate passed to his six sisters, who married into the families of Erisy, Lanyon, Trefusis, Arundell, Bonython, and Abbot of Hartland.

 

Source:  Baring-Gould, Sabine.  A Book of Cornwall.  New edition.  London, Methuen, 1906, p. 289-291.  https://archive.org/details/bookofcornwall00bari.

 

 

Pengersick Castle

 

The alliance between the Millitons and the Godolphins was cemented by the marriage of William’s daughter, Honor, to John’s son and heir.  Much refurbishment of Pengersick appears to have taken place in celebration of the event, including elaborate decoration of the panelling in the tower’s main room, illustrating the two houses thus united.  A copy was made by Dr Borlase when he visited what remained of the castle in 1738.  His original drawing still hangs in the Morrab Library in Penzance.  Unfortunately he didn’t bother to copy the portraits of William and Honor which were said to have hung above the fireplace.

John died in 1549 but his family continued to prosper.  William succeeded his father as Captain of the Mount.  The Muster Roll for 1569 indicates that he must have taken precedence over Francis Godolphin from the list of contributions which the size of his property caused him to furnish:
            “One gelding with his furniture for a light horseman, corslet, pike, haquebut, morion, long bow and sheaf of arrows”.

However, material success did not lead to long term security.  The only son of William and Honor was lost at sea in 1571.  His father died almost immediately afterwards.  The property was divided between the six surviving daughters and with none of them having sufficient of the property to preserve it as a home, it fell into disuse and was dissipated amongst their successors, finally reverting to the Godolphins.

 

Source:  Evans, Angela.  Pengersick Castle: a brief history.  Praa Sands, Out of Town Design and Print, 1998.  Cited in Huntley, Dorothy Hosking.  The Home Page of Dorothy Hosking and Dan Huntley’s Families.  http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/u/n/Dorothy-H-Huntley/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-1074.html.

 

 

 

 

4.    HENRY MILLETT  (b. about 1570)

Millett of Marazion

 

Henry Millett was the son of Peter Millett (d. 1615) and his wife Elizabeth (d. 1615).  Henry was born about 1570 at Ludgvan, Cornwall.  He married Maryinatt Skaden (b. about 1574) on 9 April 1592 at Ludgvan, where they lived.  Henry’s date of death is unknown.

 

 

Name

 

One of the first persons of the name in Cornwall.

 

Source:  Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia:  a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 568.

 

 

 

 

5.    PETER MILLETT  (d. 1615)

Millett of Marazion

 

Peter Millett was possibly descended from William Milliton (or Militon)  who was High Sheriff of Cornwall in 1566.  Peter lived in Marazion, Cornwall.  He married Elizabeth ? (buried 8 June 1615 at Madron);  they had 3 children, Henry (born 1570), Leonard (died 1631) and Robert (died 1630).  Peter died on 8 June 1615 at Madron, Cornwall.

 

 

Marazion Charter

 

Peter Millett was one of the 12 chief inhabitants of Marazion mentioned in the Charter of 1595.  He is one of the first persons of the name of Millett found in Cornwall.

 

Source:  Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 581.

 

 

 

 

6.    HUMPHRY MILLETT  (1630-1704)

Millett of Marazion

 

Humphry Millett was the son of William Millett.  He was born in 1630 at Marazion.  He lived at Ennys, Enys or Ninnis, St Hilary, Cornwall.  Humphry married Margaret Rogers (1639-1712);  they had 3 children, John (about 1666-1743), Margaret (about 1673-1699) and Elizabeth (d. 1760).  Humphry died in April 1704 at St Hilary aged 74, and was buried on 28 April 1704.

 

 

Ennys

 

Humphry Millett is believed to have built Ennys in 1688.  The house still exists in 2002, and has an inscription on the lintel “16 H + M 88”.

 

Source:  Millett, Stephen Oram Fearon.  Modified register for Peter Millett, 14 November 2005 (unpublished), p. 4.

 

 

 

 

7.    MARTIN MILLETT  (about 1630-1723)

Millett of Bosavern

 

Martin Millett was the eldest child of Christopher Millett (d. about 1700) and Honour Angwin (d. 1719).  Martin was born about 1630 at St Just-in-Penwith, Cornwall.  He married Ann Borlase (1646-1729) on 29 April 1671 at Buryan, Cornwall;  between 1671 and 1690 they had nine children.  They lived at Higher Bosavern, St Just-in-Penwith.  Martin died on 6 January 1723 at Higher Bosavern aged 93, and was buried at St Just-in-Penwith.

 

 

Lease of land

 

Lease of land, Killynack, St Just in Penwith, 19 January 1674

Parties: (1) Francis Paynter, gentleman of Boskenna  (2) Martyn Millett gentleman of St Just in Penwith.  Lease by (1) to (2) of land in Killynack [Kenidjack?], St Just in Penwith.  Term: 99 years or lives of Christopher and Jane Millett, son and daughter of Christopher Millett of St Hilary. Consideration:  £100.

 

Source:  Cornwall Record Office  http://crocat.cornwall.gov.uk/dserve/dserve.exe?dsqIni=Dserve.ini&dsqApp=Archive&dsqDb=Catalog&dsqCmd=Show.tcl&dsqSearch=(RefNo==%27AD613/5%27).

 

 

 

 

8.    LEONARD MILLETT  (d. 1686)

Millett of Marazion

 

Leonard Millett was the son of Leonard Millett (d. 1631).  Leonard resided in Marazion, Cornwall, and was Mayor of Marazion in 1675 and 1680, or possibly 1679 and 1683.  He had two sons, Robert Millett (1665-1707) and Leonard Millett (d. 1716).  Leonard died in 1686 and was buried at St Hilary, Cornwall.

 

 

Wife and marriage

 

George Bown Millett, in his Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished) p. 100, gives the name of Leonard Millett’s wife as ? Willmott.

 

Stephen Oram Fearon Millett, in his Modified Register for Peter Millett, 14 November 2005 (unpublished), p. 3, states that Leonard Millett married Mrs Wilmot Dunstan in 1663, and cites Vincent Vivian Millett:  “Wilmot (Unknown) widow of ... Dunstan who died ... ”.

 

No marriage is recorded in the International Genealogical Index or in Cornwall Online Parish Clerks.

 

The date of marriage could perhaps be determined by the birth date of their son Robert Millett.  However, Millett Roots: Cornwall at http://roots.milletts.net/cornwall.htm gives this date as 1650;  Stephen Millett gives 1665;  and the IGI gives both 1669 and 1685.

 

 

 

 

9.    JAMES MILLETT  (1647-1732)

Millett of Marazion

 

James Millett was the second child of James Millett (1627-1688) and Ellinor Clies (d. 1687).  James was born in 1647, and educated at Trinity College Cambridge where he graduated A.B. in 1670 and A.M. in 1678.  He was a clergyman, Vicar of St Just-in-Penwith from 18 July 1678 to his death in April 1732 (54 years).  His Patron was Charles II.  James married first Clarinda Treweeke (about 1651 to 1676) on 1 February 1673 at Camborne, Cornwall;  they had one child, Clarinda (about 1674-1753).  James married second Loveday Martin (about 1651-1698) on 27 July 1684 at Launcells, Cornwall;  between 1686 and 1697 they had 6 children.  James married third Thomasin Sanders (about 1651-1736) on 27 April 1703 at Sancreed, Cornwall;  they had one child, Thomasina or Thomasin (b. about 1704).  James died in April 1732 at St Just-in-Penwith aged 85, and was buried there on 20 April 1732.

 

 

Wives

 

Rev James Millett is reported to have had four wives.  It is also said that the posy on his last wedding ring was “If I survive I will have five”.

 

Sources:
Millett, George Bown.  Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished), p. 143.

Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 575.

 

 

Wrecking

 

Rev James Millett is remarkable as being the parson who, on the news being brought into church during service of a wreck (at a time when wrecking was notorious at St Just) exclaimed “Hear but five words – let us all start fair”, and then hurrying down from the pulpit he and his congregation left the church for the scene of the disaster.

 

Source:  Millett, George Bown.  Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished), p. 143.

 

 

Parish register

 

Mr. Millett wrote all the entries in the Register, in a good clear hand, to the close of 1731, within a few months of his death, and showed but little marks of age.

 

Source:  Buller, John.  A statistical account of the Parish of Saint Just in Penwith in the County of Cornwall, with some notice of its ecclesiastical and druidical antiquities.  Penzance, R. D. Rodda, 1842, p. 44 footnote.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=s4kLAAAAYAAJ.

 

 

 

 

10.    EMMANUEL MILLETT

Millett of Bosavern

 

Emmanuel Millett was a son of Christopher Millett (died February 1700) and Honour Angwin (died July 1719).  Emmanuel died without issue.

 

 

Bosavern

 

The family of Boson was established at Newlyn as early as 1584, when “Nicholas Bossen of Newlin, husbandman” purchased some land at Keygwyn and Bojuian (Bojewyan) in St. Yuste, from Thomas Keygwyn, of Plymouth, sailor, for £45.

 

In 1634 “William Bosen, merchant” and Nicholas, his son and heir, granted a lease of his land to James Nycholas, “Tynner”. They sign their names “Boson”.  In 1657 “Nicholas Bosen of Newlvn, gentleman,” apparently the son of the last named Nicholas, having married Elizabeth the daughter of John Webber, gentleman, deceased, made a jointure settlement on her.  Her marriage portion had been £300. In return for this, her husband appointed John Oliver of Sithney, gent and Arthur Paynter of St. Erth, gent, as trustees to see that she received £30 a year for life if she survived him.  This annuity was to be raised from his lands in Treungle and Hellwyn in Pawle, Keigwin and Bosèuian in St. Just, Brane in Sankrett, Chirgwin and Raftra in St. Levan, Penzance, Mousehole, Newlyn and Brewinny in Paul.  She was to have the use of the mansion-house and gardens (in Newlyn) for her life.

 

This Nicholas Boson was evidently the student of Cornish.  In 1663 he sold his lands in Keigwin to Martyn Angwyn of St. Just, gent., and in 1664 we have a deed whereby he conveys his two stitches of land (3/4 acre) in the close called Parke-an-Chappell in Bojewyan alias Bosuyan in St. Just, to Richard Angwyn of St. Just, gentleman.

 

In a deed of 1670 “Richard Angwin of Bojewyan, gent.,” is described as son of one Martin Angwin of Bojewyan, who was alive in 1605.  In 1646 he married Grace the daughter of Thomas Fleming of Landithy in Madron. ...

 

The original will of Richard Angwyn is dated October 4, 1671. ... The testator appears to have had no children, but made his sister’s son Emanuell Millett his sole executor and residuary legatee. ... To his nephew Emanuell Millett (son of his sister Honor by Christopher Millett) he left all his house and lands in Bojewyan, where he lived, with the residue of his property. ...

 

Source:  Henderson, Charles.  Nicholas Boson and Richard Angwyn.  Cornish-L Archives.  http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/CORNISH/2001-01/0980902275.

 

 

 

 

11.    ROBERT MILLETT  (1665-1707?)

 Millett of Marazion

 

Robert Millett was the elder son of Leonard Millett (d. 1686) and Wilmot Dunstan (or ? Willmott), who married in 1663.  Robert was born in 1665.  He married Margaret Oke (b. 1673) about 1694 at Marazion;  they had 3 children, Leonard (1692-1740), Robert (b. 1694) and Jane (b. 1703).  Robert was Mayor of Marazion in 1694.  He was a mariner, master of the Prosperous.  He has been named as the Secretary to Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell (1650-1707).  If so, he died on 22 October 1707 off the Isles of Scilly aged 42.

 

 

Death

 

Secretary to Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovel, and drowned with him in the wreck of H.M.S. Association off the Isles of Scilly at 8.00 p.m. on 22 October 1707, along with 800 other men.

 

Sources:

Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 568.

An account of the families of Boase or Bowes, originally residing at Paul and Madron in Cornwall, & of other families connected with them by marriage.  Truro, Netherton and Worth for Charles William, George Clement and Frederic Boase, 1893, col. 110.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=rC0AAAAAQAAJ.

 

 

But Robert Millett, mariner, was almost certainly not the Secretary of Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell (in 1707 Shovell’s secretary was René Jontin *) – if so, his death date is not known, although it must have been before 1708.  His wife may have been Jane Hill ­– see his will admon dated 29 April 1708, which refers to wife Jane.  St Hilary Burials 1700-1709 states that “Millet, Robert, of the town, son of Jane, widow” was buried on 3 March 1706, but this must be a different Robert Millett.

 

*  See Harris, Simon.  Sir Cloudesley Shovell: Stuart admiral.  Staplehurst, Kent, Spellmount, 2001, p. 362.  See also the third section of my publication Some Millett myths un-masked at http://tonymillett.tripod.com/myths.html.

 

 

 

 

12.    ELLIANOR MILLETT

Millett of Marazion

 

Ellianor Millett was the daughter of Richard Millett (b. about 1658) and Honor Trenhayle (b. about 1662), who married on 27 January 1683 at St Hilary, Cornwall. 

 

 

The will of Ann Pascoe (née Millett), written in July 1740, refers to “Ellianor Millitt, dau. of late uncle Richd Millett”.

 

Source:  Millett, Stephen Oram Fearon.  Modified register for Peter Millett, 14 November 2005 (unpublished), p. 11.

 

 

 

 

13.    WILLIAM MILLETT  (1690-1753)

Millett of Bosavern

 

William Millett was the ninth child of Martin Millett (about 1630-1723) and Ann Borlase (1646-1729), who married on 29 April 1671 at Buryan, Cornwall.  William was born on 1 October 1690 at St Just-in-Penwith, and baptised there on 18 October 1690.  He married Hannah Cornish (1696-1784) on 24 February 1717 at Sancreed, Cornwall, where they lived.  Between 1719 and 1733 they had seven children.  William died in February 1753 at St Hilary, Cornwall aged 63, and was buried there on 7 February 1753 at St Hilary.

 

 

Tin bounds

 

In 1703 William Millett had a licence agreement on tin bounds at Gweals Vean at Treviscan, Sennen, Cornwall.  The bounds belonged to Henry Vingoe, and were let by him to William Borlase, the son of Joseph Borlase of St Just-in-Penwith, William Millett, the son of Martin Millett also of St Just-in-Penwith, and his own son  Henry Vingoe Jnr.  These bounds were bordered on the four sides by Carn Colwidrocke, Sowen Peddenantes, Vaan Vrease and Mean Sebmen.

 

Source:  Pritchard, Sandra and Pritchard, George.  Sennen OPC: Mining in Sennen.  http://sennenopc.vingoe.name/mining.htm.

 

 

 

 

14.    LEONARD MILLETT  (1692-1740)

Millett of Marazion

 

Leonard Millett was the eldest child of Robert Millett (1665-1707) and Margaret Oke (b. 1673), who married about 1694 at Marazion.  Leonard was born in 1692, and baptised on 7 May 1692 at St Hilary, Cornwall.  He was a merchant, residing in Marazion.  Leonard was Mayor of Marazion in 1718 and 1719, and possibly in 1721.  He married first Jane Millett (1692-1730) on 23 June 1716 at St Hilary;  they had a number of children.  He married second Grace Millett (1708-1757) on 8 June 1731 at St Just-in-Penwith;  they did not have any children.  Leonard died in December 1740 at Marazion aged 48, and was buried on 25 December 1740 at St Hilary.

 

 

Fishing dispute

 

Leonard Millett of Marazion owned both seines and drift nets and later stated that because he and the others had been unwilling to contend any further with St. Aubyn they had agreed that he should have a decree against them “for the recovery of the tithe and they had since paid tithe for all pilchards taken in the codds and meased in the sleeves of the seines, also for pilchards taken in drift nets and for all hook fish taken by them”.

 

Source:  North, Christine and Palmer, June (eds).  The Charter Town of Marazion.  Marazion, Marazion Town Council, 1995, p. 114.

 

 

Number of children of Leonard and Jane Millett

 

George Bown Millett’s Genealogy Manuscript Book (unpublished) on page 100 gives 4 children:  Oke, John, Leonard and Jane;  and states that they “had 6 sons living in 1743”.  On pages 104-105 he gives 8 children:  Humphry, Robert, George, William, James, John, Leonard and Jane. 

 

George Clement Boase’s Collectanea Cornubiensia (1890) cols. 568-569 gives 8 children:  Humphry, Robert, George, William, James, John, Leonard, Jane.

 

Colin Kennedy’s FTM tree gives 12 children:  Jane, Jane, Oke, John, Humphrey, Leonard, James, Robert, William, George, John, Leonard.

 

Stephen Millett’s FTM tree gives 8 children:  Oke, John, Jane, Humphrey, Robert, William, George, James.

 

 

Will

 

The Will of Leonard Millett written 15th July 1738, and proved 19th February 1740

 

In the name of God Amen.  I Leonard Millett of the Town of Marazion in ye County of Cornwall Mercht being in pritty good health of body, & of sound mind, memory, & understanding, (praise be to God for the same) considdering ye frailty & uncertainty of this mortal life, do make & ordain this my last Will & Testament in manner & form following.

 

Impr :  I commend my Soul into ye hand of Allmighty God my Creator, hoping for a full & free pardon of all my sins through ye merits & mediation of my blessed Saviour & redeemer Jesus Christ, & my body I commit to ye earth to be decently buried at ye discretion of my Executrs herein after named, & as touching ye disposition of all my temporal estate wherewth it hath pleased God to bless me wth, I give & dispose thereof, as followeth.

 

Item :  My will & desire is yt all my just Debts & funeral charges be paid as soon as conveniently may be after my Death.

 

Item :  My will & desire is yt my Executrs hereafter named & herein mentioned do pay immediately after my Death ye summ of Thirty Pounds unto my dearly beloved wife Grace Millett in lieu of her first years annuity, made due & payable to her in & by my Marriage Articles wth her, & I do hereby order, direct, & appoint yt (as a farther & better Security of ye Payment of ye sd Annuity settled upon her in & by my Marriage Articles wth her) my Premises called the new Premesis, ? , the Barn, Stable & ? , adjoining to my garden Situate lying & being in Marazion aforesaid do stand & be subject & lyable to ye Payment of ye sd Annuity in such manner & form as is mentioned in & by ye sd Articles, any thing contained to ye contrary hereof in & by ye Marriage Articles in any wise not wthstanding & be lyable to entry & distress from time to time for non payment in ye like manner as my other Lands in ye sd Articles mentioned are subject to for payment thereof, & I do hereby order & direct yt my sd Executrs do at ye end of Twelve months hence next after my Death pay unto my sd wife ye Summ of one Hundred Pounds the delivering up to them one Bond or penal Bill bearing date on or abt ye 10th day of 9br 1731, entred into by me unto Tobias Harry of ye Parish of Ludgven Gentleman for the same in trust for her, my said wife to have all my ? , my best Tea Kettle, and also ye side or dressing table wth the Glass belonging, & new Chest of Drawers, all wth stands in my own Lodging Chamber a silver Ladel & sauce pan her own, the Sum of Fifteen pounds to buy her a mourning suit, I give her likewise during her life the best fire things, ye Tea Chest, ye best Diaper Table Cloth, one dozen and half of ye London Pewter Plates & the four London Pewter dishes, I give her also in case she will live in it & no longer the House wherein my Sister in Law Ann Pascoe widdow now lives in, in Marazion aforesd, after ye death of ye sd Ann Pascoe during ye life time of my sd wife (she living in it as aforesd, & not otherwise) in case my Estate & Term (?) therein shall so long continue, the repairing of ye same & paying a proportionable part of ye Lords Rents, dues, Taxes & out goings to be paid for the same.

 

Item :  I give & bequeath unto my Sons, Humphry, William, George & James, the Summ of Two Hundred & Eighty Pounds each, to be paid to them respectively as they shall respectively attain ye age of twenty one years, & if any or either of yin happen to die before they come to yt age of twenty one years, or if my Daughter Jane die before she attain yt age of twenty one years, or be married, then & in such case, the legacy of such of them so dying shall go & be distributed among ye Survivours of them & my sd daughter Jane & son Robert, share & share alike, & my Will is yt they be maintained all ye six of them & educated at ye charge of my Executrs until they come to age according to ye directions & discretion of my Trustees herein after named.

 

Item :  I give unto my Daughter Jane ye Summ of Three Hundred Pounds to be paid her when she shall attain to ye age of twenty one, but in case she marries wth Walter Thomas of Scilly who served his time wth John Hill carpenter, I only give her then five pounds & ye other Two Hundred & ninety five pounds I give to be divided equally between my Son Oke Millett & his younger brothers, share & share alike.

 

Item :  I give unto my Son Robert, one Hundred & Eighty pounds of lawfull mony of Great Brittain, to be paid him when & as soon as he shall attain ye age of twenty one years & to be maintained & educated at ye charge of my Executor until he comes to ye age of one & twenty years, & I do hereby give devise & bequeath unto my Said Son Robert all ye dwelling houses, messuages, Fields, Closes, & stitches aparcel of land wth the appurtances called ye Millways, wth in as large & ample manner as ye same is granted by ye Lease, I lately took to Lease from Lord Godolphin to hold to him during my Esate (?) & Tearm (?) therein after he shall attain ye age of one & Twenty years, after ye death of my Sister in law Ann Pascoe (excepting only ye House where in my Sister in law Ann Pascoe now lives) during ye life time of my sd wife she living in it, & in case my son Robert die before he attaind ye age of Twenty one years when ye sd Hundred & Eighty Pounds herein & before given shall be divided between ye rest of my younger children who shall be then living share & share alike.

 

Item :  I give to ye poor of ye Town of Marazion Fifty shillings to be paid them immediately after my death.

 

Item :  All yerest of my Goods, Chattels, Lands, Tenements, Hereditaments & premises wtsoever & wheresoever, I do hereby give devise & bequeath unto my Eldest Son Oke Millett, he paying my Debts & Legacies thereout, & I do hereby nominate constitute & appoint my beloved friends Humphry Millett of Ennis Gentl, James Millett of Penzance Mercht, Tobias Harry of ye Parish of Ludgvan Gentl & George Blewett of Relubbas Mercht, Trustees & Executrs of this my last Will & Testament in Trust for my Son Oke Millett & yerest of my Children & I do desire my said executors to bind out my younger Children to such Trades & employments as they shall think most convenient, ye charge of binding out my sd Children to be educated & taken out of their respective Legacies, & my will & mind is yt if my said son Oke shall happen to die before he shall attain ye age of Twenty one years, yt then all my Lands, Tenements, Goods, Chattels, & effects, he shall die ? of as executr of this my will, shall descend & fall to my son Humphry if he be living, & if he shall happen to die, then to my third son Robert, & if he shall happen to die, then to my fourth son William & so on to each of my Sons, as they shall be in seniority of age & priority of birth yt the same may not be divided among my younger children.

 

Item :  I give to each of my sd Executrs one guinea to buy a mourning ring, & I do hereby revoke, disa??, & make void all former wills by me, at any time heretofore made, In witness hereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal this 15th day of July in ye yr of our Lord God one Thousand Seven hundred thirty Eight. being writ on two sheets of paper annexd to each other.

 

Signed, Sealed, published & declared by ye Testator in our presence & we have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses hereunto in presence of ye Testator.

 

 

Codicil to the Will of Leonard Millett  

 

The Twenty Third Day of December 1740.

 

I Leonard Millett of the Town of Marazion in the County of Cornwall Merchant being weak and sick in body but of sound & disposing mind memory and understanding do hereby make this as a Codicill to my Last Will and Testament.

 

Impr :  That who was my Daughter Jane is very lately deceased (?) to whom I bequeathed two hundred pounds now I do hereby give bequeath the said two hundred pounds to my son Humphry Millett to be paid when the Legacy given him by my will shall become due and that my said Son Humphry be bound out an apprentice to an apothecary.

 

Item :  That my wife shall have the house I now live in in Marazion during her life and tis my desire that my son Oak (sic) Millett after his apprenticeship is expired shod move home and live in friendship with his mother and live with her therein.

 

Item :  I desire that eight pounds be given to the poor of Marazion with Forty shillings to be paid immediately at my death and forty shillings quarterly until the full sum be paid.

 

Witness my hand and seal this day and year abovementioned.

 

Signed sealed published and delivered as a codicill to the last Will and Testament of the said Leonard Millett in presence of  [signatures].

 

 

Notes

 

The original will was written on 15th July 1738.  The codicil was dated 23rd December 1740.  The will was proved on 19th February 1740, however in the probate document reference is made to the fourteenth year of the reign of King George the Second (1727 + 14 = 1741?) as well as the conventional form 1740, otherwise the error would be in the date of the codicil which perhaps should be 1739.

 

It must have slipped Leonard’s mind that in his original will he gave £300 to his daughter Jane, not the £200 he mentioned in the codicil.

 

In the handwritten text a character similar to y is used for the sound th, so ye means the. Other strange spellings and grammar are as in the original. Some words not decipherable are replaced or indicated by a ?.

 

            Source:  Transcription.

 

 

Bequests

 

Leonard was described as a merchant.  His status can be clearly seen for he was able in his will to leave his six sons well provided for:  four of them were left £280 each, Robert was left £180 together with some land, and the residue of the estate was left to his eldest son, Oke.  His daughter Jane was to have £300 but “in case she marries Walter Thomas of Scilly who served his time with John Hill carpenter, I only give her £5”.  This provision was never queried for Jane died after the will was written but before her father.

 

His widow, Grace, died twelve years after her husband.  She, as many others in Marazion, left some money to charity, in her case £16 to poor widows in the town, as well as other charitable bequests.  The possessions mentioned in the wills of both Leonard and Grace, including a best tea kettle, a dressing table with glass, a diamond ring, a silver ladle, a swing looking glass and a silver snuff box, her clothes and books suggest a family living in some style.

 

Source:  North, Christine and Palmer, June (eds).  The Charter Town of Marazion.  Marazion, Marazion Town Council, 1995, p. 27-28.

 

 

 

 

15.    JAMES MILLETT  (1692-1743)

Millett of Marazion

 

James Millett was the fourth child of James Millett (1647-1732) and Loveday Martin (about 1651-1698), who married on 27 July 1684 at Launcells, Cornwall.  James was born on 6 July 1692 at St Just-in-Penwith, and baptised there on 6 August 1692.  He was a merchant, resident at Kelynack, Penzance, Cornwall.  James married Elizabeth Angwin (1693-1745) on 9 September 1718 at St Levan, Cornwall;  between 1721 and 1732 they had 5 children.  James died in April 1743 aged 51, and was buried on 17 April 1743 at Madron, Cornwall.

 

 

Bosavern

 

The manor of Kalinack or Killenick was formerly very extensive, embracing several of the adjoining farms, viz: Bosavern, Hendra, Dowran, Letcha, Bosorn, and perhaps other tenements. ...

 

In the beginning of the last century the manor of Collinack or Killinack was in possession of John Nicholls, by whose trustees it was sold for the purposes mentioned in his will.  Mr. James Millett became purchaser of one part, by whom it was again sold to Mr. George Blewett in 1742, and by whose descendants it was conveyed to the present highly esteemed Proprietor, Joseph Carne, Esq., of Penzance, who has much improved the farm and the village.  To this gentleman I am indebted for this latter information.  There is still one bed room which had its ceiling a little ornamented, and over the chimney-piece are some mutilated initials;  an M is apparently that of a surname probably the James Millett mentioned above:  the date, 1691, is perfect. ...

 

Source:  Buller, John.  A statistical account of the Parish of Saint Just in Penwith in the County of Cornwall, with some notice of its ecclesiastical and druidical antiquities.  Penzance, R. D. Rodda, 1842, p. 59-60.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=s4kLAAAAYAAJ.

 

 

 

 

16.    ROBERT MILLETT  (1695-1732)

Millett of Marazion

 

Robert Millett was the fifth child of James Millett (1647-1732) and Loveday Martin (about 1651-1698), who married on 27 July 1684 at Launcells, Cornwall.  Robert was born on 7 January 1695 at St Just-in-Penwith, Cornwall, and was baptised there on 22 January 1695.  He graduated A.B. from Pembroke College Cambridge in 1716.  He was a clergyman, Vicar of St Stythian’s Church, Stithians, Cornwall.  Robert married Isabella ? about 1721 at Saltash, Cornwall;  between 1723 and 1731 they had 5 children.  Robert died in March 1732 aged 37, and was buried on 1 April 1732 at St Stythians.

 

 

Life and death

 

Robert Millett was born at St. Just on 7 January 1695;  matriculated at Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1713;  B.A. 1716/7;  curate at St. Just 1718, (perpetual curate 9 June 1718);  at Saltash 1724;  at Perranarworthal & Stithians 1726-1732, (perpetual curate of Stithians 14 Sept. 1728);  and for some time in 1730 also curate at Falmouth. ... “Mr. Robert Mellat” was buried at Stithians on 1 April 1732, aged only 37.  There is little doubt that the news of his early demise came as a very heavy blow to his old father at St. Just, who may well have been hoping for his son in due course to “step into his shoes”.  As it was he followed him only nineteen days later.  Isabella was appointed administrator of Robert’s goods, being bound in the sum of £300 together with his elder brother, James Millett of St. Just, gent., and Hugh Busvargus of St. Just, who was Robert’s half-sister Clarinda’s husband.

Under their grandfather’s will, Thomasine received 40/-, and James 20/-.  Their mother received nothing.  Robert was to have received a half-share of the residue of his father’s estate;  but due to his dying first, the whole of this may have remained to James Millett’s third wife, Thomasin (nee Sanders), who was childless. ...

 

Source:  Millett, Vincent Vivian.  A Hampshire sailor in Devonport.  Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries vol. 29, 1962-64, p. 227-230.

 

 

 

 

17.    ANN MILLETT  (1702-1738)

Millett of Marazion

 

Ann Millett was the eighth child of John Millett (about 1666-1743) and Joan Davies (about 1670-1731), who married on 17 December 1691 at St Hilary, Cornwall.  Ann was born in 1702, and baptised on 28 December 1702 at St Hilary.  She married William Rogers (about 1696-1734) on 8 January 1723 at St Hilary.  Ann died in February 1738 at Camborne, Cornwall aged 36, and was buried there on 4 February 1738.

 

 

Inheritance of house at Skewis

 

An event occurred at Skewis in 1734, that should not pass unnoticed.  Skewis had been for a long time the freehold patrimony of a succession of proprietors of the name of Rogers.  About this time there were two brothers; the elder married and lived on the farm, but without a family; the younger brother, Henry Rogers, married and had children.  He carried on the trade of a pewterer in Helston.  He has not been represented as having been a bad man, but as one little in the habit of restraining his passions, of great bodily strength, and of a wilful disposition;  and his prejudices were probably supported by an opinion, generally prevalent, that freehold lands, which have once descended to an heir, cannot be alienated without the concurrence of the next heir.

 

The elder brother died, and by his will gave the whole of his freehold property to his widow, whose maiden name was Millett.  Under the impression that the will was spurious, and despising legal remedies, he waited for an opportunity when his sister-in-law was from home, turned the servants out of the house, and took forcible possession.  The widow appealed to the law, with the voice of the whole country, however, against her; and it is universally reported that Sir John St. Aubyn would have supported Rogers, in a legal proceeding.  However that may be he prepared for violence, and refused to yield up possession when judgement was given against him; so that the sheriff was at last directed to eject him by force.  But Rogers got several persons to remain with him in the house, which had been barricaded for defence, and great numbers of people, partly from curiosity, but in part also to countenance his resistance, having assembled on the spot, the civil power was completely resisted, and two men killed by shots from the house; the under sheriff himself having narrowly escaped, the discharge of a gun from the house having burnt his wig and singed his face. This occurred on the 8th of June, 1734.

 

On the following day the under sheriff came back assisted by some soldiers, who were fired on, and one killed.  They returned the fire, but without effect.  And then, strange as it may appear, Rogers was allowed to remain undisturbed till March of the following year, when he was again blockaded by soldiers; and the siege continued for some days with the loss of two more men, when at last cannon were brought from Pendennis Castle.  On the night following their arrival, Rogers effected his escape.  He travelled on foot as far as Salisbury, with the intention, as he stated, of making his case known to the King.

 

Sir John St. Aubyn now took an active part in endeavouring to secure the fugitive, and being through his marriage, connected with the Earls of Pembroke, who resided in the neighbourhood of Salisbury, handbills descriptive of Rogers were circulated round that town.  It was said that a post boy, driving homewards a return chaise, was accosted by a stout man walking with a gun in his hand, requesting to ride.  The post boy drove him to the inn, where he procured a bed; but the circumstances and description had excited strong suspicion, and he was secured in his sleep.  He was at once removed to Cornwall.  At the time of his escape he had on a drab fustian frock, with bastard pearl buttons, and a blue riding coat.  A reward of £350 was offered for his capture.

 

At the assizes at Launceston, August 1st, 1735, came on before Lord Chief Justice Hardwick, the trials of Henry Rogers, and John Street, one of his assistants, for the murder of William Carpenter, George Woolston alias Wilson, and Andrew Willis, alias Tubby.  They were both found guilty, and sentenced to death.  After conviction they appeared to be very penitent, particularly Rogers, who did not care for any sustenance but bread and water.  He said he was guilty of one of the murders, but knew nothing of the other, yet had it been in his power, he would have killed as many more, and thought he committed no crime.  Street, who was his servant, had little to say, but that what he did was to defend his master, and he was willing to die, for by the course of nature he could not live much longer, and he hoped God would receive his poor soul.  They were executed on the 6th August, 1735.

 

Although no one attempted to justify the violence, and especially the murders committed by Rogers, yet long after the occurrence a strong feeling of compassion was entertained for him.  The marks of the bullets are still to be seen in the house at Skewis; and there is a popular notion in the neighbourhood that none of the subsequent proprietors have prospered in its possession.  The property is still in the family of Millett.

 

Sources: 

Polsue, Joseph.  A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall, compiled from the best authorities and corrected and improved from actual survey.  Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872.  4 v.  Vol. 1, p. 269-270.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=MBsiAQAAIAAJ.

See also Gilbert, Davies.  The parochial history of Cornwall, founded on the manuscript histories of Mr. Hals and Mr. Tonkin; with additions and various appendices.  Vol. 1.  London, J. B. Nichols and Son, 1838, p. 267ff.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=F7TRAAAAMAAJ.

 

 

Another account

 

A strange circumstance occurred in 1734 at Skewis, close to the line from Gwinear Road Station to Helston.

 

Skewis had been for many generations the freehold patrimony of a yeoman family of the name of Rogers.  There were two brothers.  The elder married and lived on the farm, but without a family.  The younger brother, Henry Rogers, was married and had several children.  He carried on for several years in Helston the trade of a pewterer, then of considerable importance in Cornwall, although it is now at an end.  A large portion of the tin raised was mixed with lead and exported in the form of pewter made into dishes, plates, etc., now superseded by earthenware. At the first introduction of earthenware, called cloam, in the West of England, a strong prejudice existed against it as liable to damage the tin trade, and it was a popular cry to destroy all cloam, so as to bring back the use of pewter.

 

The elder Rogers died, and bequeathed the house of Skewis and the farm and everything thereon to his wife Anne.  Henry was indignant.  He believed in the inalienability of “heir land”.   He was suspicious that Anne Rogers would make over Skewis to her own relatives, of the name of Millett.  Henry waited his opportunity, when his sister-in-law was out of the house, to enter it and bring in his wife and children and servants.  He turned out the domestics of Anne, and occupied the whole house.

 

The widow appealed to law, but the voice of the whole county was against her, and the general opinion was that the will had been extorted from her husband.  Even Sir John St Aubyn, living at Clowance, hard by, favoured him, and had Henry Rogers acted in a reasonable manner would have backed him up.  But Rogers took the law into his own hands, and when a judgment was given against him, he still refused to surrender.

 

The Sheriff of Cornwall accordingly was directed to eject him by force.  Rogers, however, barricaded the house, and prepared to defend it.  He supplied himself with gunpowder and slugs, and cut loopholes in his doors and shutters from which to fire at the assailants.

 

On June 18th, 1734, the Under-Sheriff and posse went to Skewis and demanded the surrender of the house.  From two to three hundred people attended, for the most part sympathisers with Rogers, but not willing to render him effectual assistance.

 

As the Under-Sheriff, Stephen Tillie, persisted in his demands, and threatened to break into the house, Rogers fired.  The bullet passed through Tillie’s wig, singed it, and greatly frightened him, especially as with the next discharge one of his officers fell at his side, shot through the head.

 

Several guns were fired, and then the Under-Sheriff deemed it advisable to withdraw and send for soldiers.

 

On the arrival of a captain with some regulars, Tillie again approached, when Rogers continued firing, and killed a bailiff and shot a soldier in the groin.  Two more men were wounded, and then the military fired at the windows, but did no harm. Mrs. Rogers stood by her husband, loading and handing him his gun.

 

The whole attacking party now considering that discretion constituted the best part of valour, withdrew, and Rogers was allowed to remain in possession till March in the following year, that is to say, for nine months.  Then he was again blockaded by soldiers, and the siege continued for several days, with the loss of two more men, when at last cannon were brought from Pendennis Castle.

 

Many years after, one of Rogers’ sons gave the following account of his reminiscences of the siege : —

 

“He recollected that his father was fired at, and had a snuff-box and powder-horn broken in his pocket by a ball.  He recollected that whilst he himself (then a child) was in the bed several balls came in through the window of the room, and after striking against the wall rolled about on the floor.  One brother and sister who were in the house went out to inquire what was wanted of their father, and they were not permitted to return.  On the last night no one remained in the house but his father, himself, and the servant-maid.  In the middle of the night they all went out, and got some distance from the house.  In crossing a field, however, they were met by two soldiers, who asked them their business.  The maid answered that they were looking for a cow, when they were permitted to proceed.  The soldiers had their arms, and his father had his gun.  The maid and himself were left at a farmhouse in the neighbourhood”.

 

Henry Rogers, whom the soldiers had not recognised in the darkness, managed to escape, and pushed on in the direction of London, resolving to lay his grievances before the king.  He was dressed in a whitish fustian frock, with imitation pearl buttons, and a blue riding-coat over it.

 

As soon as it was discovered that he had decamped, a reward of £350 was offered for his apprehension.  He had already shot and killed five men, and had wounded seven.  He was not, however, taken till he reached Salisbury Plain, where he hailed a postboy, who was returning with an empty chaise, and asked for a lift.  He was still carrying his gun.  The boy drove him to the inn, where he procured a bed;  but the circumstances, and the description, had excited suspicion;  he was secured in his sleep, and was removed to Cornwall, to be tried for murder at Launceston along with his servingman, John Street.

 

His trial took place on August 1st, 1735, before Lord Chief Justice Hardwicke.  Rogers was arraigned upon five indictments, and Street upon two.  Both received sentence of death, and were executed on August 6th.

 

The house at Skewis has been recently in part rebuilt, when a bag of the slugs used by poor Rogers was found.

 

It is in Crowan parish.

 

Source:  Baring-Gould, Sabine.  A Book of Cornwall.  New ed.  London, Methuen, 1906, p. 292-296.  https://archive.org/details/bookofcornwall00bari.

 

 

Henry Rogers (about 1698-1735) was the brother of Ann Millett’s husband, William Rogers (about 1696-1734).

 

 

 

 

18.    GRACE MILLETT  (1708-1757)

Millett of Marazion

 

Grace Millett was the seventh child of Robert Millett (about 1651-1728) and Honor Trefuses (about 1670-1735), who married in 1691 at Manaccan, Cornwall.  Grace was born in 1708.  She married Leonard Millett (1692-1740) on 8 June 1731 at St Just-in-Penwith, Cornwall.  Grace died without issue in 1757 at Marazion, Cornwall aged 49.

 

 

Bequests

 

Grace died twelve years after her husband.  She, as many others in Marazion, left some money to charity, in her case £16 to poor widows in the town, as well as other charitable bequests.  The possessions mentioned in the wills of both Leonard and Grace, including a best tea kettle, a dressing table with glass, a diamond ring, a silver ladle, a swing looking glass and a silver snuff box, her clothes and books suggest a family living in some style.

 

Source:  North, Christine and Palmer, June (eds).  The Charter Town of Marazion.  Marazion, Marazion Town Council, 1995, p. 27-28.

 

 

Will

 

The will of Grace Millett, second wife of Leonard Millett of Marazion, who died in 1760.  The will was proved on 12th May 1760.

 

In the Name of God Amen  I Grace Millett of the Town of Marazion in the County of Cornwall Widow being of a sound and disposing Mind Memory and Understanding (Praise be to God for the Same) altho weak in Body duly considering the frailty and uncertainty of this Mortal Life do make and ordain this to be my last Will and Testament in manner following that is to say

 

First and principally I resign my Soul unto God my Gracious Creator who gave it me utterly disdaining all hope or belief in the efficacy of my own merits, but entirely trusting in the Sole merits of my Blessed Saviour & Redeemer Jesus Christ for a perfect forgiveness of all my Sins & a joyfull Resurrection to Life Eternal.

 

Secondly I request my Executor herein after named to cause my Body to be buried in a decent and Christian Like manner and as near the Body of my late Husband as conveniently may be, and my debts and funeral Charges to be paid as soon after my Death as conveniently may be done by them.

 

And as to those worldly Goods Chattles and Effects wheresowith it hath pleased God of his Goodness to bless me in order to prevent any Dispute which may arise after my Death  concerning the same, I do hereby give bequeath and direct  them to be distributed in Manner following that is to say

 

Impr I give and bequeath unto the Mayor Alderman Chapple Wardens and Overseers of the poor of the Town of Marazion aforesaid for the Time being, and to the Vicar of the parish of St Hillary for the time being Sixteen pounds to be paid them by my Executor herein after named at the End of One Year next after my Decease, which said Sum I do desire and direct may be by them lent or placed out at Interest on good Security, and the annual Interest thereof laid out in Beef and distributed annually on Christmas Eve to such poor widows of Marazion aforesaid as shall receive no Relief from the poor rates of the said Town, and in such manner as the said Mayor Alderman Chaplewardens and Overseers shall think most proper.

 

Item I give and bequeath to such Poor Widows aforementioned & described fifty shillings  to be distributed among them by my Executor herein after named imediately after my Death in such Manner as they shall think most proper.

 

Item I give and bequeath to such poor widows of the parish of Illogan in the said County as receive no Benefit or Relief from the poor rates of the said parish five pounds to be paid to the Churchwardens and Overseers of the poor of the said parish some or one of them immediately after my Death, and to be by them distributed in Such Manner as they shall think most proper.

 

Item I give and bequeath to such poor Widows of the parish of St Hillary aforesd as receive no Relief from the poor rates of the said parish fifty shillings to be paid to the Church wardens & Overseers of the poor of the said parish some or one of them immediately after my Death, and to be by them distributed in such manner as they shall think most proper.

 

Item I give and bequeath to the Mayor Aldermen and Chapelwarden of Marazion aforesaid for the time being Seven pounds for the use of the Chaplain or Lectivror (?) of Marazion aforesaid, to be paid him seven equall payments of twenty shillings each annually at Easter, the said seven pounds to be paid to the said Mayor Aldermen and Chaplewardens at the End of One Year next after my Decease.

 

Item  I give and bequeath unto Leonard Son of my Son in Law Mr Oke Millett of Marazion aforesaid ten pounds, and to Elizabeth and Jane his Daughters five pounds each, and to his wife five pounds to be paid the said Oke Millett for their use at the end of one year next after my decease.  I likewise give and bequeath to the said Oke Millett a folio Book called an Exposition on the new Testament together with the swing looking glass, the Dressing table and the tea chest which were given me by his late father.  I likewise give to his wife my Chest of Drawers and my black Paduasoye Gown to be delivered them immediately after my decease.

 

Item I give and bequeath to my Son in Law Mr Humphrey Millett of Penzance twenty pounds and to his Daughter Grace five pounds to be paid the said Humphrey Millett at the End of one Year next after my Decease.  I likewise give and bequeath to the said Humphrey the Silver Snuff box which was given me by his late father I likewise give to his wife my green paduasoye Gown, and to his daughter Jane my diamond ring, I also give to the said Humphrey the two China Mugs which Mr Tyson gave me to be delivered them immediately after my Decease.

 

Item I give and bequeath to my Son in Law Mr George Millett of Helstone, twenty pounds to be paid him at the End of One Year next after my Decease, I likewise give him a Blew and white China Bowl to be delivered him immediately after my Decease.

 

Item I give and Bequeath to my Son in Law Mr James Millett of Helstone twenty pounds, and to his daughter Grace my Goddaughter five pounds to be paid him at the End of One Year next after my Decease.  I also give him one Dozen of Blew and white China plates to be delivered to him immediately after my Decease.

 

Item I give and bequeath to my Son in Law Mr William Millett of Marazion twenty pounds and to his wife five pounds to be paid him at the End of One year next after my Decease. I also give him my China Caudle cup and my Book called Nelson’s Feasts and fasts to be delivered him immediately after my Decease.

 

Item I give and bequeath all my best Lace between the wives of the aforementioned William Millett George Millett and James Millett to be equally divided between them.

 

Item I give and bequeath to Mr Humphrey Cole and to Mr William Thomson both of Marazion aforesaid One Guinea each to be paid them at the End of one Year next after my Decease.

 

Item I give and bequeath to Elizabeth Hugh Spinster who now lives with me, Daughter of William Hugh of Marazion aforesaid Mason Thirty pounds to be paid her at the End of One Year next after my Decease.

 

Item  I give and bequeath to Mrs Sibella Fudge and to Mrs Mary Laity of Marazion aforesaid widows One Guinea each and to Catharine Davy and to Honour the wife of  John Meyer of the same ten shillings and six pence each to be paid them respectively immediately after my Decease.

 

Item  I give and bequeath to Mrs Martha Thomas the Mourning Ring which I had from her Aunt Mrs Elizabeth Ekinos.

 

Item  I give and bequeath to my Sister Jane Millett twenty pounds I also give and bequeath unto Ann the Daughter of the aforementioned William Hugh and Wife of James Millett of Marazion aforesaid five pounds, to be paid them respectively at the End of One Year next after my Decease.

 

Item I give and bequeath unto Eleanor Millett and Honour Millett of Marazion aforesaid five pounds each to be paid them respectively at four equall quarterly payments of twenty five Shillings each at Easter, Midsummer, Michaelmas and Christmas successively, the first quarterly payment whereof to be made at the first of the said feasts which shall happen next after my Decease.

 

Item I give and bequeath unto my sister Hannah Millett five pounds to be paid her at the end on One Year next after my Decease, I likewise give her for her own use only during her life time all my plate, and from and immediately after her Death I give and devise the same to Leonard the Son of my Son in Law Robert Millett of Marazion aforesaid.

 

Item I give and bequeath unto Elizabeth the Daughter of Edward Mellen late of Marazion aforesaid Taylor five pounds to be paid her at the End of One Year next after my Decease.

 

Item I give and bequeath unto Sarah the wife of Mr John Vigurs of Penzance and to Loveday her Sister the wife of Mr John Maddern Junof St Just to each a Gold Ring with a Ruby Stone.

 

Item I give and bequeath unto the two Youngest Children of my Cosin Robert Millett of Marazion aforesaid One Guinea each to be paid them immediately after my Decease.

 

Item I give and bequeath unto my Sister Elizabeth the Wife of the aforementioned William Hugh my long hood and Cloak, my Scarlett cloak and Velvet Hood, four of my common Shifts, two Holland Aprons, a Large Silk and Muslin Handkerchief and two inside petticoats, And to my sister Jane aforenamed I give and bequeath my lustring Gown, and all the peires belonging to it, two of my best Holland aprons A white Quilted outside petticoat my Striped Muslin Cap and Ruffles, Two of my plain Cambrick half handkerchiefs and one of my best inside quilted petticoats, also I give my said sister Jane, the Comon prayer book I use in the Chaple together with my Book called the Imitation of Jesus Christ, To be delivered them respectively, immediately after my Death. And all the rest of my Wearing Apparell of what Kind or Quality Soever I give and bequeath unto Hannah the wife of the aforementioned Robert Millett my Son in Law and to the aforenamed Elizabeth Hugh Spinster who now lives with me, to be equally divided between them.

 

Item I give and bequeath unto my aforementioned Sister Elizabeth Hugh the Wife of the said William Hugh an Annuity or Yearly Sum of four pounds to be paid her during her natural Life at four equall quarterly payments of twenty shillings each at Easter Midsummer Michaelmas and Christmas, the first of the said Quarterly payments to be made at the first of the said feasts which shall happen next after my Decease And my will is that the said annuity and the Several Quarterly payments thereof shall be paid Her independent of her said Husband and be for her Sole and Separate Use and Benefitt and not lyable to any Debt or Demands of her said Husband.

 

Item I give and bequeath unto Leonard the Son of my said Son in Law Robert Millett the Sum of two Hundred pounds and to Robert the son of the said Robert twenty pounds to be paid them respectively as and when they shall have attained the Age of twenty one Years respectively In the mean time my Will is and I do hereby direct that the said several sums  of two hundred pounds and twenty pounds shall be laid out in the same publick Security by my executor herein aforenamed as soon after my Death as he conveniently can, and from and out of the yearly interest and produce thereof that my said Executor shall and do pay to my aforenamed Sister Elizabeth Hugh the annuity of four pounds herein before mentioned in such mannor as is hereinbefore specified concerning the same.

 

Item I give and bequeath unto Elizabeth Millett Daughter of Mr James Millett late of Penzance deceased One Guinea to be paid her at the End of One Year next after my Decease.

 

Item I give and bequeath farther to Jane the Daughter of my aforementioned Son in Law Humphrey Millett ten pounds to be paid at the End of one year next after my Decease.

 

Item  I give and bequeath to Mrs Amy Mowgham of ... widow such of Dr ... Works as I have and to Mrs Mary Clutterbuck Wife of Mr Thomas Clutterbuck of Marazion aforesaid the book which Mrs Spry gave me being Archbishop Tillotson’s Works to be delivered them immediately after my Death. 

 

All the Rest Residue Remainder of any Goods Chattles Rights Credits and Effects whatsoever and wheresoever I give and bequeath unto my aforenamed Son in Law Robert Millett of Marazion aforesaid, And I do hereby nominate and appoint my said Son in Law Robert Millett to be whole and sole Executor of this my Last Will and Testament, and my aforementioned Sons in Law William Millett and James Millett adjudicators and Overseers of the same, to see my said Will duly performed and Executed.  And I do hereby revoke all former Wills by me at any time heretofore made, and do hereby publish and declare this to be my last Will and Testament. 

 

In witness whereof I have hereto set my hand and seal this thirteenth day of Aprill in the Year of our Lord One thousand Seven Hundred and fifty Seven.

 

Signed Sealed published and declared

by the said Testatrix as and for her last Will and

Testament the day and year afore written (the same

being written on three sheets of paper) in Presence

of us

 

(Thos Clutterbuck

John Kier)

 

            Source:  Transcription.

 

 

Which parents?

 

The International Genealogical Index states that Grace Millett, who married Leonard Millett on 8 June 1731 at St Just-in-Penwith, was the daughter of John Millet and Joan Davis.  However, an analysis of the bequests given in Grace Millett’s will shows this to be incorrect.

 

Here is a list of the Milletts referred to in Grace’s will of 13 April 1757, arranged by

relationship:

 

Sons-in-law                                        Children                                  Wife

 

Oke Millett of Marazion                    Leonard, Elizabeth, Jane        Unnamed
Humphrey Millett of Penzance          Grace, Jane                             Unnamed
George Millett of Helstone                                                                Unnamed
James Millett of Helstone                  Grace                                      Unnamed
William Millett of Marazion                                                             Unnamed
Robert Millett of Marazion                Leonard, Robert                      Hannah

 

Sisters

 

Jane Millett
Hannah Millett
Elizabeth Hugh, wife of William Hugh

 

Cousin

Robert Millett                                     “2 youngest children”

 

Other

 

William Hugh of Marazion   Elizabeth Hugh, “spinster, who now lives with me”
Ann, “wife of James Millett of Marazion”
Elizabeth, “daughter of James Millett late of Penzance”
Elizabeth Millett “of Marazion, aforesaid”
Honour Millett “of Marazion, aforesaid”

 

The term “sons-in-law” usually refers to the husbands of the person’s daughters, but as Grace did not have any children, here it appears to refer to the sons of her husband Leonard by his first wife Jane.  Their children included Oke Millett (whose children included Elizabeth (by first wife) and Leonard and Jane (by second wife));  Humphry Millett (whose children included Grace and Jane);  George Millett;  James Millett (whose children included Grace);  William Millett;  and Robert Millett (whose children included Leonard and Robert, and whose wife I have as Anna which is close to Hannah).

 

If Grace was the daughter of John Millett and Joan Davies, she would have had a sister Jane and a sister Honour (= Hannah), but not a sister Elizabeth.  However, if she was the daughter of Robert Millett and Honor Trefuses, she would have had a sister Jane and a sister Honour, and a sister Elizabeth who married William Hugh and had daughters Elizabeth Hugh (who was a spinster) and Ann Hugh (who married James Millett).

 

It would appear from the evidence of her will, therefore, that the IGI is wrong and that Grace Millett is the daughter of Robert Millett and Honour Trefuses.

 

 

 

 

19.    HUMPHRY MILLETT  (1723-1757)

Millett of Marazion

 

Humphry Millett was the sixth child of Leonard Millett (1692-1740) and Jane Millett (1692-1730), who married on 23 June 1716 at St Hilary, Cornwall.  Humphry was born in 1723 at Marazion, Cornwall,, and baptised on 13 October 1723 at St Hilary.  He was a mercer.  He lived in St Just-in-Penwith.  Humphry married Elizabeth Adams (1721-1757) on 20 February 1746 at St Just-in-Penwith;  between 1746 and 1754 they had 5 children.  Humphry died on 3 June 1757 at Penzance aged 34.

 

 

Children

 

Humphry and Elizabeth both died of fever in June 1757.  Mr John Tonkin, M.R.C.S., was lodging in the house at the time of the early deaths of Mr and Mrs Millett, he took care of the children and supplied the place of a father to them.  The children were under the charge of a cousin, Miss Peggy Williams, who also carried on the mercery business.

 

Sources:

An account of the families of Boase or Bowes, originally residing at Paul and Madron in Cornwall, & of other families connected with them by marriage. Truro, Netherton and Worth for Charles William, George Clement and Frederic Boase, 1893, col. 110.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=rC0AAAAAQAAJ.

Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 568.

 

 

 

 

20.    ANN MILLETT  (née Sandys)  (1724-1806)

Millett of Marazion

 

Ann Sandys was the fifth child of Sampson Sandys (about 1690-1764) and Philippa Thomas (about 1694-1766).  Ann was born in 1724, and baptised on 22 June 1724 at Helston, Cornwall.  She married George Millett (1724-1781) on 4 February 1752 at Helston;  between 1753 and 1764 they had 12 children.  Ann died on 26 March 1806 at Helston aged 82, and was buried there on 30 March 1806.

 

 

Monument in Helston Church

 

Near this place are deposited the remains of Mrs. Ann Millett;  whose unaffected piety, meekness, and resignation, were equally conspicuous.  After an inoffensive life of eighty-two years she died with a composed spirit, and in a firm hope of redemption, on the 26th of March, 1806;  beloved, honoured, and lamented.

 

Source:  Polsue, Joseph.  A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall, compiled from the best authorities and corrected and improved from actual survey.  Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872.  4 v.  Vol. 2, p. 171.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=MBsiAQAAIAAJ.

 

 

 

 

21.    JAMES MILLETT  (b. about 1729)

 Millett of Marazion

 

James Millett was the fourth child of Robert Millett (1695-1732) and Isabella ?, who married about 1721 at Saltash, Cornwall.  James was born about 1729, and baptised on 9 August 1729 at Stithians, Cornwall.

 

 

Family

 

For possible marriage and descendants of James Millett, see Millett, Vincent Vivian. A Hampshire sailor in Devonport. Devon and Cornwall Notes and Queries vol. 29, 1962-64, p. 227-230.

 

 

Which James?

 

The International Genealogical Index, the Cornwall Online Parish Clerks, and Vincent Vivian Millett’s article “A Hampshire sailor in Devonport”, all state that the James christened on 9 August 1729 at Stithians was James Mellat, son of Robert or Robart Mellat.  It seems very likely that this James was the son of Rev. Robert Millett and Isabella ?, since Robert was Curate at Perranarworthal and Stithians from 1726 to 1732.

 

The IGI does list another James Millet, son of Robt Millet, who was christened on 14 January 1722 at St Hilary, and this is confirmed in St Hilary Baptisms 1699-1840 and the Cornwall Online Parish Clerks, which state that James Millet son of Robert was baptised on 14 January 1721 (which is usually written as 1720/21).  This James is less likely to have been the son of Rev. Robert Millett and Isabella ?, particularly if Robert and Isabella were married in Saltash in 1721 or 1722 (Robert was curate at Saltash from about 1724 to 1726), both because of the date, and because a baptism in St Hilary seems unlikely.  If this James is their son, the child must have died in infancy prior to 1729.

 

Alternatively, James could possibly have been the son of Robert Millett (baptised 2 September 1693 at St Hilary), son of Richard Millett and Honor Trenhayle who married on 27 January 1682/83 at St Hilary.  However, there is no evidence at present that this is so.

 

 

 

22.    HUMPHRY MILLETT  (1745-1774)

 Millett of Marazion

 

Humphry Millett was the elder child of Humphry Millett (1694-1750) and Grace Polwhele (about 1698-1760), who married on 26 June 1740 at St Clement, Cornwall.  Humphry was born on 1 March 1745, and baptised on 2 April 1745 at St Hilary, Cornwall.  He matriculated from Exeter College, University of Oxford on 11 March 1762.  He was a clergyman.  He resided at Enys, St Hilary.  Humphry married Mary Sandys (1742-1819) on 19 December 1765 at Helston, Cornwall;  they had two children, Mary (1766-1855) and Grace (1772-1868).  Humphry died on 16 November 1774 at Enys, St Hilary aged 29, and was buried at St Hilary.

 

 

Ennys

 

See  131. Ennys (below).

 

 

Legal action

 

Humphry Millett brought an action against John Blewett, the son of George Blewett, one of his father’s executors, to recover some shares in the Great Work Mine near Helston, Cornwall and the dividends on them.  The case was tried in the Exchequer 17 December 1772 and decided in his favour, and on an appeal to the House of Lords 28 February 1774 the judgement was affirmed.  Cf. Josiah Browne’s Cases in Parliament (1803) vii, 367-374.

 

Source:  Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 574.

 

 

John Blewett v. Humphry Millett

 

Nothing is better established as a general proposition than that where a trustee for an infant renews a lease in his own name, the renewed lease shall enure for the infant’s benefit.  This is a doctrine founded on general policy to prevent frauds, and has long been an established rule in the Courts of Equity.

 

The present is a glaring instance of the apparent contradiction between the state of the case as adopted by the original Editor, and the determination of the courts.

 

28th February 1774

 

John Blewett,      Appellant

Humphry Millett,   Respondent

 

HUMPHRY MILLETT, the respondent’s father, was in his lifetime a considerable adventurer in mines;  and his concerns therein were attended with that variety of success, which is usual in all undertakings of so precarious a nature.  Among other shares of mines which Mr. Millett was entitled to at the time of his death, were seven thirty-second parts of a certain tin mine in the parish of Breage, in the county of Cornwall, called the Western Great Work, and one-tenth part of an adjoining tin mine called the Eastern Great Work;  both these mines having been granted by the Earl of Godolphin, as the lord and owner of the soil, to one Stephen Pearce and his co-adventurers, under a reservation of every sixth dish of fine ore, deliverable on the grass, as the Lord’s Dole, according to the laws and customs of the stannaries.

 

Mr. Millett, sensible of the uncertainty of advantages arising from this species of property, and of the many casualties to which it is liable, appeared very anxious, upon the final disposition of his fortune, to guard as much as possible against them;  and as his son, the respondent, for whom the bulk of that fortune was intended, was then an infant, the most probable method which suggested itself to him of effectuating this intention, was to invest his executors with a discretionary power of carrying on or relinquishing his mine adventures, as time, accident, or other circumstances, should render it most for his son’s benefit.  Accordingly on the 6th of April 1750, Mr. Millett made his will, and after giving several legacies, he thereby disposed of the residue of his estate, in the following words :  viz. “Lastly all the rest, residue and remainder of my goods and chattels both real and personal, rights, credits, and effects whatsoever, I do hereby give, devise, and bequeath the same unto my son Humphry Millett; and I do hereby make, ordain, constitute, and appoint my well-beloved wife Grace Millett, Edward Collins, John Millett and George Blewett (the appellant’s father) executrix and executors of my last will and testament, in trust for my said son Humphry Millett;  and to be guardians and trustees over my said children, until they shall respectively attain the age of 21 years:  And I do hereby will and desire, direct, authorize, and empower my said executrix and executors from time to time, during the minority of my said son Humphry Millett, to carry on and adventure my several and respective parts and shares of adventure, in the several tin and copper mines, in which I shall adventure at the time of my death, for my said son Humphry Millett, and in trust for him, or to discontinue the same, or such of them as they in their discretion shall think fit:  And moreover, for them my said executrix and executors to retain, deduct, and keep, out of my goods and chattels, all their charges and expenses in adventuring as aforesaid, or otherwise relating to the trust I have hereby reposed in them.”

 

On the 13th of June 1750, the testator died, without altering or revoking his will;  at which time the respondent was an infant of about five years old;  and soon afterwards the executrix and executors duly proved the same, and acted in the execution thereof for the respondent’s benefit, by carrying on the testator’s shares in such mines as were deemed profitable and advantageous, and discontinuing his shares in such as were in a contrary situation.

 

Among the latter sort were the two mines abovementioned, called the Western Great Work and the Eastern Great Work;  for both of them having been wrought deep, and the charges of working and drawing the water from the bottoms becoming consequently very great, they, in a short time after the testator’s death, became losing and unprofitable adventures.

 

George Blewett the appellant’s father was a co-adventurer with the testator, and several other persons in these two mines;  he having one-eighth share in the Western Great Work, and one-tenth share in the Eastern Great Work.

 

About two years after the testator’s death, a meeting of the several persons interested in these two mines was held, in order to consider and determine on what was most proper to be done concerning them;  when as well on account of the very unpromising condition thereof, as because the Lord Godolphin had by his steward insisted, that the sets of the mines, and the right of working the same, was become forfeited according to the Stannary Laws:  It was unanimously agreed, to discontinue working the mines and surrender the sets thereof;  and some of the old partners agreed to make an application to the Lord, to consolidate both the mines into one, and to grant a new set thereof, when so consolidated, to such of the old adventurers, and such other persons as should be willing to become partners, upon more beneficial terms than before;  and in pursuance of this agreement, the working of the mines was accordingly discontinued, the sets surrendered, and the materials sold for the benefit of the partners.  But many of the old partners declined any concern with the new partnership, which was formed and consisted of some of the old partners, and some new persons.  The mines were also consolidated, and called by the name of the Great Work.

 

On the 1st of May 1753, a new set thereof was granted to the said George Blewett, for the benefit of himself and the new partners therein, under the reservation of every ninth, instead of every sixth dish of the ore, deliverable on the grass, as the Lord’s dole.

 

It is usual for sets of mines, or tin works in the county of Cornwall, to be granted to one of the adventurers only;  who, though he is considered as a trustee for himself and his co-adventurers, yet he never makes any assignment of, or executes any declaration of trust touching the respective shares of such co-adventurers, but only enters their names and shares in a book called the Mine Book, which is deemed a sufficient evidence of their right and property in the mine.

 

Accordingly, in the month of February 1754, the names and shares of the several co-adventurers in this consolidated mine, were entered and declared in the Mine Book as follows:  viz. John Rogers, one fourth;  George Blewett, one eighth;  the executors of Humphry Millett, one eighth;  William Tremayne and son, one eighth;  Humphry  Cole, one sixteenth;  the executors of John Millett, one sixteenth;  Captain John Richards, one sixteenth;  Captain Hugh Roger, five ninety-sixths;  Richard Jones, one thirty-second;  Captain Samuel Lemon, one forty-eighth;  John Nancarrow, one forty-eighth;  and the said John Nancarrow was then appointed manager of the mine.

 

At the time of this transaction, Mr. Blewett, Mrs. Millett and Mr. Collins were the only surviving executors of the testator’s will.  It did not appear that either Mrs. Millett or Mr. Collins was consulted upon the propriety of subscribing an eighth share in this new mine for the infant’s benefit, and therefore it was presumed that Mr. Blewett subscribed this eighth part for the infant’s benefit conditionally, if the other two executors should think proper to confirm the act by their approbation;  and this presumption was confirmed by Mr. Blewett’s advancing to Mr. Nancarrow several considerable sums on account of this eighth part, to the amount of £253 and upwards, without charging the same or any part thereof to the account of the testator’s estate, until such approbation should be obtained.

 

Proper measures were soon afterwards taken for improving the mine, by erecting a fire-engine, driving adits, sinking shafts, and in other necessary works, at an expense of £7000 and upwards.  But it was for a long time a matter of very great doubt, whether the mine would ever turn up sufficient quantity of tin stuff to repay such expense, and satisfy the current charges of working it.

 

The apprehension of loss arising from the state of the mine, occasioned Mr. Collins and Mrs. Millett to express their uneasiness and dissatisfaction with Mr. Blewett’s conduct, in engaging any share of it for the infant;  they being apprehensive that the expense of working the mine being very considerable, and the probability of profit very uncertain, it could not be for the infant’s interest to continue his concern therein any longer;  but they declined being explicit on the occasion, and would not in positive terms either assent or dissent to the continuance of such concern.

 

However, as the annual period of settling the accounts of the mine approached, and as Mr. Blewett did by no means relish the conduct of his co-executors, or the equivocal situation in which he stood with respect to them;  he thought it absolutely necessary for his own safety that they should come to a precise determination, whether the share which he had subscribed for the benefit of the infant should be continued or not:  For this purpose Mr. Blewett in the beginning of October 1754, wrote the following letter to Mr. Collins: “I have again considered of what passed between us when I last saw you, relative to the carrying on the late Mr. Humphry Millett’s adventures, and more particularly that of the Great Work;  and am still of the opinion it would be for the child’s benefit to adventure therein:  However, as you were pleased to express yourself of a different opinion, and we are very soon to settle the accounts relating to that mine, I desire your’s and Mrs. Millett’s final resolution in answer, for my government therein.”  To this letter Mr. Collins on the 9th of the same month returned the following answer: “I am so much a stranger to the state of all Mr. Millett’s adventures, both in mine and at melting-house, that it is my final resolution not to engage in any of them as one of his son’s trustees, and therefore utterly decline being concerned in that particularly which you call the Great Work.”

 

This letter from Mr. Collins conveying only his own negative, Mr. Blewett thought it necessary to obtain Mrs. Millett’s direct sentiments upon the matter;  and accordingly, on the 20th of the said month of October 1754, he sent Mr. Collins’s letter to her by Mr. William Cornish his clerk, requesting her final resolution on the subject of it:  And after reading that letter, and entering into some conversation with Mr. Cornish about the condition of the mine, and the expenses likely to be incurred in adventuring the same, Mrs. Millett desired Cornish to acquaint Mr. Blewett that she would concur in everything relative to her son’s affairs with Mr. Collins, and that therefore she could by no means consent to the carrying on the one-eighth part of the said adventure called the Great Work, on her son’s account.

 

Mr. Blewett, in consequence of these concurring sentiments of his co-executors, thought it incumbent on him to get rid of the said one-eighth share which he had so subscribed in the best manner he could.  And as it is never customary in mine adventurers to expose any relinquished share to a public or open sale, but to offer it to the other co-adventurers;  Mr. Blewett at a public meeting of such co-adventurers held in December 1754, for the purpose of auditing and settling their annual accounts, informed them of what had passed between Mr. Collins, Mrs. Millett and himself, respecting the share which he had originally subscribed in the name of Humphry Millett’s executors;  and offered the same to such of them as would accept it, and in case of their refusal, proposed to carry on that share for his own benefit.  But none of the co-adventurers seeming inclined to increase their respective concerns in the mine, by taking up such relinquished share, nor in any manner objecting to Mr. Blewett’s taking it up on his own account, his name was accordingly at such meeting, and with the unanimous consent of every person present, entered in the Mine Book for one-fourth part of the said adventure, consisting of the one-eighth part which he had originally taken up for himself, and the eighth part which had been entered for the infant’s benefit, but was afterward relinquished in the manner above mentioned.  And thereupon Mr. Blewett was charged therewith, and paid one fourth part of the costs attending the said mine, from the time of the new grant, and which included the before mentioned sum of £243 and upwards, which he had formerly paid on account of the testator’s estate, but had never charged the same therewith, because the object of such charge had not been approved of by his other co-executors.

 

In December 1765 Mr. Blewett died intestate, leaving the appellant his only son, who soon afterwards obtained letters of administration to him, and thereby became his personal representative.

 

On the 1st of March 1766 the respondent attained his age of 21;  and soon afterwards thought it proper to file his bill in the court of Exchequer against Mrs. Millett his mother, and against the appellant as the personal representative of his late father, charging the whole of his said father’s conduct respecting the mine to be fraudulent;  and therefore praying that the appellant might come to an account for the profits which had been received by Mr. Blewett in his lifetime, or by the appellant since his death, for or in respect of the said one eighth share of the mine, from the time that such share was changed into the name of Mr. Blewett as aforesaid;  that the appellant might pay the respondent what should appear due to him upon the balance of such account with interest;  and that the appellant might procure the respondent to be entered in the Mine Book as an adventurer for the said one eighth share of the mine, together with all the gains and profits thereof unreceived and unaccounted for.

 

To this bill the appellant put in an answer, and thereby, after stating the several facts before set forth, he insisted that the respondent was not entitled to any share or interest in the mine, whereon to ground the relief prayed by his bill;  and that the whole of Mr. Blewett’s conduct, as one of the respondent’s trustees under his late father’s will, was in every respect fair and honest, and free from the least imputation of fraud.

 

The cause being at issue, and several witnesses examined on both sides, came on to be heard before the Barons of the Exchequer on the 17th of December 1772, when the court was pleased to declare, That the respondent was entitled to an eighth share of the said mine;  and to decree the appellant to account for the profits thereof received by the said George Blewett in his life-time, and by the appellant since his death;  and it was ordered that the appellant should do all necessary acts in order to vest the interest of such share in the respondent, and that the respondent should pay the defendant Grace Millett her costs to be taxed, and should have the same over again, together with his own costs, against the appellant.

 

The appellant apprehending himself aggrieved by this decree, appealed from it:  And on his behalf it was contended that this case did not fall within the general rule, that no trustee shall benefit himself out of his trust estate;  for here the testator invested his executors with a discretionary power to carry on or discontinue his mine adventures as they should see proper. This power, with respect to the share of the mine in question, was actually and deliberately executed by the major part of the surviving executors;  and the share being thus relinquished, became free for any person to take it up who should be inclined to do so.  Besides, the ground of that relinquishment plainly shewed in what light the object of it was then considered, namely, as an unprofitable not a beneficial interest;  and that therefore it was at the respondent’s advantage to get rid of it.  Mr. Blewett in this transaction must be considered as acting in two different capacities:  As a trustee, he recommended the continuance of the share upon motives the most disinterested and conclusive with respect to himself, because he was thereby determined to continue his own share;  and as a trustee he was controlled by the joint negative of the other two, and the share in question was consequently relinquished and given up.  Here then an end was put to Mr. Blewett’s conduct as a trustee, quoad this part of the respondent’s property;  and in everything that happened afterwards he acted in his own private and personal capacity.  If therefore the general rule could be extended to this case, it must of necessity follow, that if any one of the other proprietors of the mine, or indeed any other person, had taken up this relinquished share, he would have been considered as a trustee thereof for the respondent’s benefit;  which no one would contend.

 

It had been, and might again be urged on the part of the respondent, that upon the relinquishment of the share in question, Mr. Blewett ought to have sold the same in an open and public manner, and to the best advantage:  But to this it was answered, and was in evidence of the cause, that the mine was at that time in debt to the proprietors in upwards of £6000 and that the prospect of its ever clearing itself of this debt was then very uncertain: The relinquished share was not therefore a marketable commodity, being loaded with a proportionable part of so heavy a debt.  And with respect to the manner in which it was transferred, the offering it to the several co-adventurers at a public meeting, and with the most explicit declaration of the occasion of such offer, was actually exposing it to sale in the most open and public manner that could be, and had all the effect which could be expected from any other mode;  inasmuch as the purchaser took it cum onere, and no claim was ever made by him upon the respondent, or his estate, for any part of the expense which had been previously incurred upon this share.  Further :  By this decree, the respondent was to pay Mrs. Millett’s costs, and to recover them over again from the appellant, whereas it did not appear that she was in any shape a necessary party to the suit, having no kind of interest in the matter in question;  but, on the contrary, had been examined as a witness for the respondent:  His bill therefore, as against her, ought to have been dismissed with costs;  and those costs paid by the respondent himself.

 

On behalf of the respondent it was said, that nothing is better established as a general proposition, than that where a trustee for an infant renews a lease, the renewed lease shall enure for the benefit of the infant.  This is a doctrine founded on general policy to prevent frauds;  and the known case of Rumford market, has established it as a rule of equity.  The trustees situation in respect of the estate, gives him access to the landlord;  and it would be dangerous to permit him to make use of that access for his own benefit.  In this case the new grant which was obtained, was in the nature of a renewal;  it came in the place of the old adventures, which subsisted in the time of Humphry Millett.  George Blewett understood it so, and by the indorsement on the indenture, or the entry in the Mine Book, allotted one eighth to Millett’s executors;  and in consequence thereof, payments were made by the executors, and they were debited in their capacity of executors.

 

But it is objected, that the executors had power to abandon any of the adventures that should be thought fit to be abandoned;  and in that moment when great expense was likely to be incurred, Mr. Blewett was obliged to abandon the one eighth in dispute, as executor, because Mrs. Millett and Mr. Collins refused to concur in carrying it on.  It was conceived, however, that the facts did not warrant the objection.  Mr. Collins’s letter only imported, that he was a stranger to the matter, and could not judge what was expedient to be done, and that therefore he could not personally engage in any of the mine adventures.  But it was not from thence to be inferred, that all were to be abandoned;  and it was plain, that this was the manner in which Mr. Blewett understood Mr. Collins’s letter;  for though Mr. Collins had declared he would not engage in any of the mine adventures, yet, with Mr. Blewett’s approbation, many other adventures were carried on, on account of the executorship.  As to what passed between Mr. Blewett and his agents and Mrs. Millett, it appeared by her evidence, that she left it to his discretion, to carry on or sell the share belonging to the infant;  but she did not appear to have an idea that the share was to be wholly abandoned;  she only desired that he would act for her infant son, as he meant to act for himself.  If the evidence of Cornish (examined on the part of the appellant, and to whom George Blewett gave one 48th share of the adventure) was attended to, it did not show that Mrs. Millett determined, on a clear and full state of facts, to abandon the adventure:  Cornish stated, that before Mrs. Millett signified her dissent, some conversation passed between him and her about the state of the mine, the prospect it afforded, and the charges likely to be incurred in carrying it on.  What the conversation was, or what account the witness (Mr. Blewett’s messenger and favourite clerk) gave to Mrs. Millett’s enquiries, was not stated;  but if she acted upon that conversation, it might be supposed, that Cornish represented the adventure as not worth pursuing;  and though Collins’s letter was produced to her, yet she did not appear to have been at all apprised of the contents of Blewett’s letter to Collins.  Besides Mrs. Millett resided 20 miles from the mine;  but Mr. Blewett in the neighbourhood of it.  What the general opinion of the neighbourhood in respect to the mine was, could not be unknown to him, though it probably had not travelled 20 miles;  and many witnesses proved, that so early as May 1753, more than a year before the application to Mrs. Millett, it was the general opinion, that the mine would turn out advantageous.  But none of the witnesses said, that this opinion was carried to Mrs. Millett; and it was no unfair intendment to suppose, that Mr. Cornish’s conversation with her (which he had thought proper to withhold) gave her a very different state of things.  And that the mine would probably prove a beneficial adventure at the time when Mrs. Millett was applied to, and when it was admitted she enquired after the prospect of things, was proved decisively against Mr. Blewett and Cornish, by their continuing adventurers in it.

 

After hearing council on this appeal it was ORDERED and ADJUDGED, that the same should be dismissed, and the decree therein complained of, affirmed.

 

Source:  Blewett v. Millett.  In Brown, Josiah.  Reports of cases upon appeals and writs of error determined in the High Court of Parliament, 1702-1779.  2nd edition, with notes and many additional cases, brought down to the year 1800, by T. E. Tomlins.  London, J. Butterworth, 1803, vol. 7, p. 367 ff.

 

 

Publications

 

John Blewitt v. H. Millett.  An appeal to the House of Lords concerning the conduct of the Executors of H. Millett.  1779.  2 pts.

 

Source:  Boase, George Clement and Courtney, William Prideaux.  Bibliotheca Cornubiensis: a catalogue of the writings, both manuscript and printed, of Cornishmen, and of works relating to the County of Cornwall, with biographical, memoranda and copious literary references.  London, Longmans, Green, Reader and Dyer, 1874, vol. 1 p. 360.  http://www.archive.org/stream/bibliothecacorn00courgoog.

 

Blewett, John.  House of Lords.  Between John Blewett, Esquire, the only son and administrator of George Blewett, gentleman, deceased, appellant, and Humphry Millet, clerk, the son and residuary devisee of Humphry Millett, deceased, respondent.  The appellant’s case.  London, 1774.  6 p.  (Heard before the House of Lords, February 1774).

 

Millett, Humphry.  John Blewett, Esq (administrator of George Blewett, Esq, deceased, who was one of the surviving executors in trust of Humphrey Millett, Esq, deceased, during the minority of Humphrey Millett, Esq, his son), appellant.  And the said Humphrey Millett, Esq, respondent. The respondent’s case.  London, 1774.  3, 1 p.  (Heard before the House of Lords, February 1774).

 

Source:  English short-title catalogue (http://estc.bl.uk/)

 

 

Monument in St Hilary Churchyard

 

Attached to a lofty stone obelisk are the family arms and the following inscription, sculptured in marble:–
“In memory of Humphry Millett, of Enys, Esq., who died November XVI, MDCCLXXIV; aged XXVIII years”.

 

Source:  Polsue, Joseph.  A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall.   Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872.  4 v.  Vol. 2, p. 189.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=MBsiAQAAIAAJ.

 

 

 

 

23.    JOHN MILLETT  (1749-1815)

Millett of Bosavern

 

John Millett was the eldest child of John Millett (1724-1793) and Dorcas Trevorian (about 1724-1799), who married on 15 December 1748 at St Mary’s, Truro, Cornwall.  John was born in 1749, and baptised on 19 March 1749 at Ludgvan, Cornwall.  He was a miner.  He married Eliza Smith (about 1756-1836) on 20 March 1777 at Mylor, Cornwall.  Between 1778 and 1796 they had 13 children.  They lived at Bosavern, St Just-in-Penwith.  John died intestate on 29 September 1815 aged 66 from the effects of a fall, and was buried on 4 October 1815 at St Just-in-Penwith.

 

 

Monuments

 

Monuments and tablets in the Church at St Just-in-Penwith bear the following inscriptions:-

 

Sacred to the memory of John Millett, Esqr. of Bosavern in this parish, who died Septr. 29th, 1815; aged 65.

 

Also to the memory of his sons.
      Edward Millett, who died at Trinidad May 24th, 1803; aged 16.
      Samuel Cornish Millett, who died March 15th, 1813; aged 18.
      William Smith Millett, who died April 27th, 1814; aged 32.
      And John Millett, who died May 4th, 1814; aged 33.

 

Their remains are deposited in the family vault beneath.


His widow who survives to deplore the loss of her affectionate husband and children, erects this monument to their memory.

 

Source:  Polsue, Joseph.  A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall, compiled from the best authorities and corrected and improved from actual survey.  Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872.  4 v.  Vol. 2, p. 292.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=MBsiAQAAIAAJ.

 

 

 

 

24.    RICHARD OKE MILLETT  (1749-1832)

Millett of Marazion

 

Richard Oke Millett was the eldest child of Oke Millett (1718-1777) and Mary Tyacke (about 1719-1782), who married on 2 April 1746 at St Germoe, Cornwall.  Richard was born on 29 March 1749 at Marazion, and baptised on 18 April 1749 at St Hilary.  He resided at Penpol, Phillack, Cornwall.  Richard married first Jane Curnow (about 1742-1806) on 3 April 1770 at St Clement, Cornwall;  between 1771 and 1784 they had 9 children.  Richard married second Elizabeth Richards (about 1772-1842) on 5 September 1807 at St Hilary;  they had 1 child, Caroline (1808-1817).  Richard was a surgeon.  He was Captain of one Corps of the Copperhouse Company of Volunteers, and a Partner in the Deed of 25 October 1779 in the Cornish Copper Company (with £1,000).  Richard died on 3 September 1832 aged 83, and was buried on 8 September 1832 at Phillack.

 

 

Cornish Copper Company

 

Richard Oke Millett was the son-in-law of John Curnow (1697-1780).  Through his wife Jane, one of the three co-heirs of John Curnow, and by an arrangement with the other co-heirs, he was able to lease the Penpol estate and move into the ancient Penpol house, where his presence proved to be an asset for the Cornish Copper Company in what came to be known as the “Thirty Years War” with rival company set up by John Harvey.

 

Richard was always “willing and ready to contest, on CCC’s behalf, the rights which John Harvey was claiming to the waters of the Penpol River”.  In January 1795, probably on a suggestion from John Edwards (Manager of CCC from 1765-1807), Richard “withdrew the permission given some time previously to Harvey to make a small leat [an open watercourse conducting water to a mill] on the edge of the Penpol wastrel to carry off the water from the working of a Boring Mill.  This was followed by a threat to fill in the leat if Harvey’s men did not stop using it.  If this threat of force were carried into effect it would result in the Boring Mill coming to a halt.  In the event Harvey did fail to act and so John Edwards sent in his men to fill in the leat”.

 

In February 1795 Richard Oke Millett, Captain Henry Prideaux with about 40 men “knocked off the stocks a lighter being built by Harveys”;  Harvey complained that “the timber was put in a place where the tide flows and this morning [25 February 1795] the sea carried off a great many pieces which is a great loss”.

 

Source:  Pascoe, W. H.  CCC: the history of the Cornish Copper Company.  Redruth, Dyllansow Truran, Cornish Publications, 1982, p. 39, 40, 59, 62-64, 78, 159.

 

 

 

 

25.    GRACE MILLETT  (1750-1826)

Millett of Marazion

 

Grace Millett was the fourth child of Humphry Millett (about 1723-1757) and Elizabeth Adams (about 1721-1757), who married on 20 February 1746 at St Just-in-Penwith, Cornwall.  Grace was born in 1750 at St Just-in-Penwith, and baptised on 7 March 1752 at Penzance.  She married Robert Davy (1746-1794) on 16 September 1776 at Madron, Cornwall;  between 1778 and 1794 they had 6 children, including Humphry Davy (1778-1829), later Sir Humphry Davy, chemist and inventor.  Grace died on 3 September 1826 at Penzance aged 76, and was buried on 9 September 1826 at Ludgvan, Cornwall.

 

 

Upbringing

 

[Robert Davy’s] wife, whose maiden name was Grace Millett, was remarkable for the placidity of her temper, and for the amiable and benevolent tendency of her disposition:  she had been adopted and brought up, together with her two sisters, under circumstances of affecting interest, by Mr. John Tonkin, an eminent surgeon and apothecary in Penzance;  a person of very considerable natural endowments, and whose Socratic sayings are, to this day, proverbial with many of the older inhabitants. ...

 

The parents of these children, having been attacked by a fatal fever, expired within a few hours of each other:  the dying agonies of the surviving mother were sharpened by her reflecting on the forlorn condition in which her children would be left;  for although the Milletts were originally aristocratic and wealthy, the property had undergone so many subdivisions, as to have left but a very slender provision for the member of the family to whom she had united herself.

 

The affecting appeal which Mrs. Millett is said to have addressed to her sympathising friend, and medical attendant, was not made in vain:  on her decease, Mr. Tonkin immediately removed the three children to his own house, and they continued under the guardianship of their kind benefactor, until each, in succession, found a home by marriage.

 

The eldest sister, Jane, was married to Henry Sampson, a respectable watchmaker at Penzance;  the youngest, Elizabeth, to her cousin, Leonard Millett of Marazion;  neither of whom had any family.  The second sister, Grace, was married to Robert Davy, from which union sprang five children, two boys and three girls, the eldest being Humphry.

 

Source:  Paris, John Ayrton.  The life of Sir Humphry Davy, Bart. LL.D.  London, Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley, 1831.  2 v.  Vol. 1, p. 3-4.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=e5oEAAAAYAAJ.

 

 

Grace Millett, Humphry Davy’s mother, was born in 1750, the youngest of three daughters of Elizabeth and Humphry Millett of the mining parish of St. Just.  While the family had once been well-to-do, her parents spent most of their lives in straightened circumstances.  To support the family Humphry Millett kept a mercer’s shop.  Both of Grace Millett’s parents died suddenly and unexpectedly, he on 3 June, she on 9 June 1758.  The oldest daughter, Elizabeth, went to live in St. Just with her maternal grandmother, but the two younger daughters, Grace and Jane, along with their two brothers – the younger of the boys was five months old – passed into the care of Miss Peggy Adams, a maternal cousin.

 

They also claimed the protection of Mr. John Tonkin, bachelor, surgeon and apothecary of Penzance.  He assumed responsibility for them because, at the time of the senior Millett’s death, he had had lodgings in their house.  For many years he continued to make his home with them, functioning as surrogate father.  Since the mercer’s shop continued to support the family his financial help was never needed.  Tonkin, obviously a man with strict ideas about the behaviour of the Millett children, would not permit Grace Davy to wait on trade.  She was encouraged to develop her talent for making hats, which were sold to “the very best families in the neighbourhood”, and many of her customers were “her particular friends”.  After her marriage to Robert Davy, Grace followed the business on “a very large scale”.  John Tonkin continued to play an important role in her life;  many times she told her children how much she was indebted to him “for the protection and for the great interest he took in all that concerned them, but not for their maintenance”.

 

Source:    Fullmer, June Z.  Young Humphry Davy: the making of an experimental chemist.  Philadelphia, Pa., American Philosophical Society, 2000, p. 14-15.   (Memoirs of the American Philosophical Society, v. 237).

 

 

 

 

26.    LEONARD MILLETT  (1755-1841)

Millett of Marazion

 

Leonard Millett was the first child of Robert Millett (1725-1809) and Anna Tresaddern (1728-1793), who married on 31 July 1754 at St Hilary, Cornwall.  Leonard was born on 2 November 1755 at Marazion, and baptised there on 7 November 1755.  He resided in Marazion, and was Mayor of Marazion in 1797, 1801, 1807, 1813, 1817, 1822 and 1826.  He was Dutch Consul for Penzance and St Ives.  Leonard married Elizabeth Millett (1754-1820) on 27 July 1796 at Madron;  they probably did not have any children.  Leonard died on 15 March 1841 at Marazion aged 86, and was buried on 22 March 1841 at St Hilary.

 

 

Consul

 

His Royal Highness the Prince Regent has been pleased to approve of Mr. L. Millet, as Consul for His Royal Highness the Prince of Orange Nassau, Sovereign Prince of the United Provinces of the Netherlands, at Mountsbay and St. Ives.

Source:  London Gazette 3 December 1814;  Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post, or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser (Exeter) Thursday 8 December 1814.

 

 

Children

 

Query issue two children:  a daughter who died in Penzance of a lingering illness in 1820, and another daughter who died in Penzance in October 1821.

 

Source:  An account of the families of Boase or Bowes, originally residing at Paul and Madron in Cornwall, & of other families connected with them by marriage.  Truro, Netherton and Worth for Charles William, George Clement and Frederic Boase, 1893, col. 110.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=rC0AAAAAQAAJ.

 

 

Bequests

 

Leonard Millett left charitable donations to his native town.  There are memorial tablets in Marazion and St Hilary churches.

 

Source:  Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 569.

 

 

Memorial in St Hilary Church

 

A tomb in the Church is inscribed:

 

Sacred to the memory of Leonard Millett, Gent. of Marazion, who died on the 15th of March, 1841; aged 86.

His bequests for charitable uses to his native town survive as a memorial of his benevolent and amiable disposition.

Also to the memory of Elizabeth, his wife, who died on the 19th of December, 1820; aged 66.  Blessed are they who die in the Lord.

 

Source:  Polsue, Joseph.  A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall, compiled from the best authorities and corrected and improved from actual survey.  Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872.  4 v.  Vol. 2, p. 189.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=MBsiAQAAIAAJ.

 

 

 

 

27.    MARTIN MILLETT  (about 1756-1836)

Millett of Bosavern

 

Martin Millett was the fifth child of John Millett (1724-1793) and Dorcas Trevorian (about 1724-1799), who married on 15 December 1748 at St Mary’s, Truro, Cornwall.  Martin was born about 1756, and baptised on 14 November 1756 at Ludgvan, Cornwall.  He lived in London.  Martin married Elizabeth Bunster (about 1759-1833) on 4 March 1784 at Mylor, Cornwall;  between 1785 and 1797 they had 5 children.  Martin died in January 1836 at Poplar, Middlesex aged 80, and was buried on 24 January 1836 at St Pancras (old church), London.

 

 

Possible descendants

 

The following were possibly descendants of Martin and his 3 sons:–

H. R. Millett in business in Camomile st. and Bishopgate st. 1801-48;
James Millett of Drum lane, Brentford 1807;
Charles Millett, attorney 19 The Terrace, Gray’s inn 1807 and his son Charles Millett, attorney, 1817;
George Millett of High st. Fulham 1840;
Edwin Millett of 4 Little Chapel st. Westminster 1843;
Henry Millett of 34 Peel st. Church lane, Kensington 1850;
John Millett of 76 Brunswick st. Blackwall 1850;
William Millett of 5 Lion st. New Kent road 1850.

 

Source:  Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 576.

 

 

 

 

28.    SAMPSON MILLETT  (1757-1794)

Millett of Marazion

 

Sampson Millett was the fifth child of George Millett (1724-1781) and Ann Sandys (1724-1806), who married on 4 February 1752 at Helston, Cornwall.  Sampson was baptised on 1 June 1757 at Helston.  He died, unmarried, on 14 April 1794 aged 37, blown up in HMS Ardent, which caught fire and exploded near Corsica in April 1794.

 

 

HMS Ardent

 

HMS Ardent was a Royal Navy 64-gun third rate ship of the line, launched on 21 December 1782 at Bursledon, Hampshire.  In April 1794 Ardent was stationed off the harbour of Villa Franca to watch two French frigates.  It is presumed that she caught fire and blew up.  HMS Berwick encountered some wreckage while cruising in the Gulf of Genoa in the summer that suggested fire and an explosion.  A part of Ardent’s quarter deck with some gunlocks deeply embedded in it was found floating in the area, as was splinter netting driven into planking.  No trace was ever found of her crew of 500.

 

Source:  Wikipedia.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Ardent_(1782).

 

The Maritime Archaeology Sea Trust’s Royal Navy Loss List, 1512-1947 gives the Ardent’s date of loss as 14 April 1794.  See http://www.thisismast.org/rn-loss-list/search.php.

 

 

 

 

29.    WILLIAM MILLETT  (1759-1791)

Millett of Marazion

 

William Millett was the sixth child of George Millett (1724-1781) and Ann Sandys (1724-1806), who married on 4 February 1752 at Helston, Cornwall.  William was born on 6 July 1759 at Madron, Cornwall, and baptised on 30 July 1759 at Helston.  He married Elizabeth Stidiford (1757-1838) on 7 October 1784 at St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly, where they lived.  Between 1785 and 1792 they had four children.  William died at Scilly on 25 August 1791 aged 32, shot by James Dunkin, and was buried at St Mary’s, Penzance.

 

 

Account of death

 

Penzance, Cornwall.
In consequence of an information, Mr. Millet, Exciseman, of Helston, and several other Officers, were proceeding to board a smuggling cutter, which lay off the Land’s End, supposed to belong to a person at Penzance : as the boat drew near they were hailed by the people from on board the cutter, who desired them to keep off, as they were determined not to be searched;  but the Officers persevering in their intention, the crew of the cutter fired upon them, by which Mr. Millet was shot through the head, and another person in the breast, both of whom instantly expired;  a third died this morning of the wounds he received;  and a fourth had his arm broke, but is in a fair way of recovery.  The smuggling cutter escaped – little doubt is entertained but she will soon be taken.

 

Source:  The Oracle (London) Saturday 3 September 1791.

 

 

August 25th, 1791, Mr. Thomas Hall, Surveyor of the Customs at Scilly, having received information of a smuggling vessel, called the Friendship, of Penzance, belonging to James Dunkin, and commanded by George Bramwell, went out in his boat in search of her, and about ten o’clock at night fell in with her, in Old Grimsby Harbour, near the island of Tresco;  on his rowing towards the said vessel for the purpose of boarding her, a person from the deck hailed and asked, “What boat is that?” and upon the said Hall’s answering, “The custom boat”, two muskets or blunderbusses were immediately fired by the said James Dunkin into the said boat, by which William Millett and John Oliver, two of the boatmen, in the said custom-house boat were killed, and John Jane, another of the boatmen, dangerously wounded.  The coroner’s inquest sat on the bodies of the said William Millet and John Oliver, and brought in their verdict Wilful Murder, against the said James Dunkin, or others, on whom he had vast influence.

 

His Majesty for the better discovering and bringing to justice the persons concerned in this most atrocious offence, was pleased to promise his most gracious pardon to any one of the said offenders, who shall discover his accomplice, or accomplices (except the said James Dunkin, or any other person who actually fired), so that any one or more of them may be apprehended and convicted of the offence.

 

And as a further encouragement, the Commissioners of his Majesty’s Customs, in order to bring the said offenders to justice, promise a reward of five hundred pounds to any person or persons who shall discover and apprehend, or cause to be discovered and apprehended, the same James Dunkin;  and a reward of two hundred pounds, for the discovery and apprehending any one or more of the other persons concerned in these murders, to be paid by the Receiver General of his Majesty’s Customs upon conviction.

 

Sources:

London Gazette 20 September 1791, p. 529-530.

Troutbeck, John.  Survey of the ancient and present state of the Scilly Islands…  Sherborne, Printed and sold by Goadby and Lerpiniere, 1794, p. 233-234.  https://books.google.co.nz/books/about/A_Survey_of_the_Ancient_and_Present_Stat.html?id=GUYOAAAAQAAJ&redir_esc=y.

 

 

 

 

30.    GEORGE MILLETT  (1762-1816)

Millett of Marazion

 

George Millett was the tenth child of George Millett (1724-1781) and Ann Sandys (1724-1806), who married on 4 February 1752 at Helston, Cornwall.  George was born in 1762 at Helston, and baptised there on 17 December 1762.  He joined the Honourable East India Company’s Maritime Service, and was a director of the  H.E.I.C.  He married Elizabeth Coggan (about 1764-1823) on 21 October 1786 at St Andrew Undershaft, Leadenhall Street, London;  between 1787 and 1801 they had 8 children.  He was a Master Mason in 1790.  George died on 17 February 1816 at Walthamstow, Essex aged 54, and was buried at Wanstead, Essex in the Coggan vault.

 

 

Maritime service

 

Born in England, seaman King George packet three voyages Falmouth to Lisbon;  midshipman Valentine (2) 1769/70;  midshipman Royal Henry 1771/2;  2nd mate Molly to America;  4th mate London (13) 1779/80 (approved 12 November 1779, aged 24);  2nd mate Rodney (2) 1781/2;  1st mate Rodney (2) 1784/5;  captain King George (4) 1786/7;  captain Princess Amelia (3) 1789/90, 1792/3 and 1794/5.

 

Source:  Farrington, Anthony.  A biographical index of East India Company Maritime Service officers 1600-1834.  London, British Library, 1999, p. 543.

 

 

Served in the Honourable East India Company’s navy and became Commodore of their fleet;  Colonel of the 2nd Regiment of the Royal East India Volunteers, raised amongst the employees of the H.E.I. Company in Leadenhall Street, London, England 1809.

 

Source:  Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 569.

 

 

Commander of the ship King George, in the East-India-Company’s service.

 

Source:  The Times Issue 563, 23 October 1786, p. 3 col. C.

 

 

On Friday last Capt George Millett was sworn in by the Court of Directors of the East India Company, as Commander of the ship Princess Amelia, burthen 808 tons, bound to Bengal;  she will be dispatched about the 30th March 1790.

 

Source:  London Chronicle Tuesday 20 October 1789.

 

 

Yesterday a Court of Directors was held at the East India House, when the following Gentlemen attended, and were sworn into the command of their respective ships, viz. Captain George Millett, Hindostan, 1248 tons, consigned to China direct ...

 

Source:  Courier and Evening Gazette (London) Thursday 31 January 1799.

 

 

Yesterday a Court of Directors was held at the East India House, when Capt. George Millett was sworn into the command of the Indostan, destined to Madras and China.

 

Source:  Courier and Evening Gazette (London) Thursday 27 November 1800.

 

 

East India Company Directorship

 

To the Proprietors of East India Stock.


Ladies and Gentlemen,


An opinion having generally prevailed that the introduction of another professional Person into the Direction, who has long been conversant in your maritime concerns, would be conducive to the interests and advantage of the Company, and being encouraged by many respectable friends to offer myself to your notice, I take the liberty thus early to announce my intention of soliciting your suffrages on some future vacancy in the Direction.  Having passed more than thirty years of my life in your maritime service. and having been during that time a Commander six voyages, and conducted several of your valuable fleets in safety, I trust I shall not be thought unqualified for the important trust to which I venture to aspire.  I have the honour to be, with the greatest respect, Ladies and Gentlemen, your most obedient, and devoted Servant, GEORGE MILLETT.  117 Leadenhall-street, May 27.

 

         Source: The Morning Post (London) Saturday 30 May 1803, p. 1 col. A.

 

 

To the Proprietors of East India Stock.


Ladies and Gentlemen,


Having some months since taken the liberty of offering myself to your notice for a Seat in the East India Direction upon some future vacancy, I beg leave to renew my solicitation for the honour of your suffrages;  but alas precluded, by having recently held a situation in the ? service, from becoming a Candidate for the present vacancy, by the decease of your late worthy Director, Sir Lionel Darell, I have now only to repeat my earnest ? to be favoured with your countenance and support on some other occasion.  I have the honour to be very respectfully, Ladies and Gentlemen, your most obedient and devoted Servant, GEORGE MILLETT.   Leadenhall-street, 31st Oct. 1803.

 

         Source:  The Morning Post (London) Tuesday 1 November 1803, p. 1 col. A.

 

 

To the Proprietors of East India Stock.


Ladies and Gentlemen,


Having already signalled my intention of becoming a CANDIDATE for a Seat in the Direction, whenever a vacancy might take place, I now beg leave most earnest to intreat the honour of your Vote and Interest, to succeed your late much lamented Director, Mr. Jackson.  In the diligent pursuit of my Canvas for that honourable situation, my personal application will not, I trust, be deemed intrusive;  and should they be crowned with successful marks of your favourable opinion, my zeal shall be unremitted to evince the high sense I entertain of my public duty and private obligation.  I have the honour to be, with the greatest respect, Ladies and Gentlemen, your devoted humble servant, GEORGE MILLETT.  Wallwood House, Laytonstone, Nov. 28, 1804.

 

A meeting of Captain Millett’s Friends will be held at the London Tavern, Bishopsgate-street, on Tuesday next, the 4th of December, at two o’clock precisely, for the purpose of considering of the proper steps to be pursued to secure the success of his application for the vacant Seat  in the East India Direction.  Committee Room, 2, Cowper’s-court, Cornhill, Nov. 29.

 

         Source:  The Morning Post (London) Friday 30 November 1804, p. 1 col. A.

 

 

London Tavern, Dec. 5, 1804.


At a numerous Meeting of the Friends of Captain George Millett, Esq. convened by public Advertisement, and held here this day:


William Williams, Esq. was called to the Chair.


The following Resolutions being moved by Robert Hunter, Esq. and seconded by Pascoe Grenfell, Esq. M. P. were passed unanimously:

 

1st.  That this Meeting, fully sensible that the Court of Directors should at all times be composed, in due proportions, of Gentlemen best acquainted with the various concerns of the Company, in the different departments of Commerce, Territorial Acquisitions, Military and Naval Affairs, and looking to the present and probable state of the Direction in these several departments, do most heartily concur in the general received opinion, that it would be adviseable to promote the increase of the number of Directors, who, from professional education and habits, may be supposed best qualified to conduct the Naval Department, now happily become so extensive a branch of the Company’s concerns.

 

2nd.  Resolved, therefore, That this Meeting will collectively and individually exert their utmost endeavours to promote the Election of Capt. George Millett, one of the Candidates for the present vacant Seat in the East India Direction, being, in our opinion, a gentleman in every respect well qualified to discharge the duties of that important situation, more especially in the superintendance of the Naval Branch of the Company’s Concerns, from the experience of upwards of thirty-three years acquired in that department, in which he has distinguished himself as a most able, faithful,  and zealous Officer, in the service of the Company.

 

3rd.  Resolved, That a Committee be appointed for the purpose of carrying the foregoing Resolutions into effect, and that the same be an open Committee, to meet daily, at No. 2, Cowper’s-court, Cornhill.

William Williams, Chairman.

 

 

To the Proprietors of East India Stock.


Ladies and Gentlemen,


The numerous and respectable Meeting of my Friends, Proprietors of India Stock, assembled this day, having, in the most flattering terms, expressed their opinion of my pretensions to the honour of your support to succeed to the vacant Seat in the Direction, I am encouraged by such a distinguished mark of favour and approbation, to look forward, with increased confidence, to ultimate success.  I beg leave to repeat, that I shall diligently pursue my Canvas, and trust my personal applications will not be considered intrusive.  I have the honour to be, Ladies and Gentlemen, your devoted humble servant, GEO. MILLETT.  2, Cowper’s-court, Cornhill, Dec. 5, 1804.

 

Captain Millett’s Committee will meet daily at No. 2, Cowper’s-court, Cornhill, where the attendance and communications of his Friends will be esteemed a favour.

 

         Source: The Morning Post (London) Thursday 6 December 1804, p. 1 col. A.

 

 

To the Proprietors of East India Stock.


Ladies and Gentlemen,


As is has been reported that it is not my intention to proceed to the ballot on the present Vacancy in the Direction, and as such an opinion, if uncontradicted, may operate materially to my prejudice, I feel it is incumbent upon me to declare that the report is wholly unfounded, and to assure you that the flattering promises of support which I have experienced in my Canvas, and the zeal and active exertions of my friends, encourage me to look forward with confident expectations of success.  I therefore most earnestly entreat your early appearance in my favour, on Thursday the 20th inst. being the Day of Election.  The Resolutions of a numerous and respectable Meeting of Proprietors, held at the London Tavern, on the 5th inst. have fully explained the grounds upon which I have ventured to stand forward on the present occasion.  The necessity of a sufficient proportion of professional persons in the Court of Directors, who from education and habits are qualified to conduct the Naval Department, has been generally admitted;  and as few Gentlemen in that line now remain in the Direction, a very laborious and important branch of Naval concerns necessarily falls upon their superintendance, and in the event of their indisposition, may therefore ultimately occasion considerable embarrassment to the Company’s Maritime Service.  On these pretensions, as the only Naval Candidate, I rest my claim to your protection and support.  Having no other employment, it will be my pride to dedicate my whole time and attention to the management of your concerns, and on all occasions to evince the high sense of gratitude and respect with which I have the honour to be, Ladies and Gentlemen, your devoted humble servant, GEO. MILLETT.  2, Cowper’s-court, Cornhill, Dec. 10, 1804.

 

         Source:  The Morning Post (London) Tuesday 11 December 1804, p. 1 col. A.

 

 

Yesterday a ballot was taken at the East India House, from 9 in the morning until 6 in the evening, for the Election of a Director, in the room of Wm. Adair Jackson, Esq. deceased.  At nine o’clock the Scrutineers reported the numbers to be:

 

For John Bebb, Esq.         636
       James Pattison, Esq.  404
       John Jackson, Esq.    392
       George Millett, Esq.  248


Whereupon John Bebb, Esq. was declared duly elected.

 

         Source:  The Morning Chronicle (London) Friday 21 December 1804.

 

 

To the Proprietors of East India Stock.


Ladies and Gentlemen,


Although the event of the Ballot at the India House yesterday, was not equal to the kind wishes and expectations of my friends, arising principally from a number of Proprietors who would otherwise have supported me having been long pre-engaged, and the opinion entertained that I should not proceed to the Ballot, I am still encouraged by the promises I have received, and the approbation expressed of the public grounds on which I came forward to renew my solicitations for the honour of your support on the next vacancy, which may happen in the Direction.  To the Proprietors who did me the honour of attending in my favour yesterday, and to my friends in particular who actively exerted themselves on the occasion, I beg most sincerely to offer my grateful thanks.  And have the honour to be, with the greatest respect, Ladies and Gentlemen, your devoted humble servant,  GEO. MILLETT.  Wallwood House, Laytenstone, Dec. 21, 1804.

 

         Source:  The Morning Post (London) Saturday 22 December 1804, p. 1.

 

 

George Millett stood again for the position of Director of the East India Company at the end of 1805, and was “chosen a Director without opposition” in January 1806.

 

          Source:  The Morning Post (London) Thursday 9 January 1806, p. 1.

 

 

He subsequently resigned, but was re-elected on 12 April 1809.

 

          Source:  The Morning Chronicle (London) Thursday 13 April 1809.

 

 

George Millett’s Directorship ended by rotation in April 1813, and he did not stand again for health reasons.

 

          Source:  Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh) Monday 19 April 1813.

 

 

 

 

31.    RICHARD MILLETT  (1770-1826)

Millett of Bosavern

 

Richard Millett was the eleventh child of John Millett (1724-1793) and Dorcas Trevorian (about 1724-1799), who married on 15 December 1748 at St Mary’s, Truro, Cornwall.  Richard was born on 10 March 1770 at Little Pinnick, Tywardreath, Cornwall, and was baptised on 12 April 1770 at Tywardreath.  He was a master mariner, Captain of Volunteers, and Agent for Lloyds at Penzance.  He married Sarah Towers (1774-1810) on 1 September 1798 at St Anne’s, Limehouse, London;  they had four children.  After Sarah’s death he married Ann Penberthy (1770-1842) on 10 February 1811 at Madron, Cornwall;  they did not have any children.  Richard died on 23 June 1826 at Lower Lariggan, Penzance aged 56, and was buried on 29 June 1826 at Madron.

 

 

Arms

 

As a consequence of Richard Millett’s marriage to Sarah Towers on 1 September 1798, the Towers arms (Sable, on a chevron between three towers argent as many pellets of the first) were quartered with the Millett arms of 1616 (Argent a fess gules between three dragons’ heads erased vert).

 

 

 

 

32.    JOHN CURNOW MILLETT  (1771-1848)

Millett of Marazion

 

John Curnow Millett was the first child of Richard Oke Millett (1749-1832) and Jane Curnow (about 1742-1806), who married on 3 April 1770 at St Clement, Cornwall.  John was born on 5 January 1771 at Penpol, Cornwall, and was baptised on 9 January 1771 at Phillack.  He was educated at Pembroke College, University of Oxford, matriculating on 2 April 1789;  he graduated  B.A. in 1793.  He was a clergyman.  John married first Mary Thomas (1769-1801) on 16 November 1797 at Phillack;  they had 2 children, John Thomas Millett (1798-1873) and Mary Millett (1800-1887).  John married second Mary Honey (1788-1859) on 5 February 1806 at Lansallos;  between 1807 and 1826 they had 10 children.  John lived at Trewen in Lannarth and Penpol, Cornwall.  He was a Partner in the Deed of 1828 in the Cornish Copper Company.  John died on 13 January 1848 at Penpol aged 77, and was buried on 19 January 1848 at Phillack.

 

 

A caution to tenants

 

R.O. Millett, esq. and the Rev. J.C. Millett v. W. Jacka.

 

On the 11th inst. a writ of enquiry of damages was executed at Truro, before Joseph Edwards, esq. Under-Sheriff of this County.  The action was brought for sundry breaches of covenant contained in defendant’s lease which expired at Michaelmas last, such as for not repairing the buildings and fences, for omitting to sow proper grass seed, for cutting the furze at an improper growth, &c. &c. and respectable witnesses having proved the injury sustained, the Jury returned a verdict for £64.

 

          Source:  Royal Cornwall Gazette (Truro) Saturday 18 April 1812.

 

 

Dissolution of partnership

 

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore subsisting between us the undersigned, Ambrose Oxley, Leonard Millett, William Millett, John Curnow Millett, Daniel Bamfield, William Richards, William Harris, Thomas Hichens, John Budge; Francis Edmonds, John Polkinghorne, Francis Jenkyns, William Burgess, and William Hichens, carrying on business as Tallow-Chandlers, in the Town of Marazion, in the County of Cornwall, in the name or style of the Marazion Candle Concern, hath been this day dissolved by mutual consent.  All persons having any demand on the said concern are requested to apply to Mr. William Hichens, of Saint Ives, in the said County, Attorney at Law, who is appointed by us to arrange and settle the affairs thereof, and to whom all debts owing to the said concern are to be forthwith paid. — Dated the 8th day of May 1835.

 

SourceLondon Gazette 12 June 1835, p. 1128.

 

 

Trewen

 

Trewen, for a considerable period the seat of the family of Dandy, has long been occupied as a farm house.  Over the chief entrance were placed the initials and date T. D., 1666, B. D.

From the Rev. John Curnow Millett, the late proprietor, the estate has passed to Mrs Mary Anne Allpress and Dr. Millett.

 

Source:  Polsue, Joseph.  A complete parochial history of the County of Cornwall, compiled from the best authorities and corrected and improved from actual survey.  Truro, William Lake, 1867-1872.  4 v.  Vol. 3, p. 37.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=MBsiAQAAIAAJ

 

 

Death

 

The Hayle station of the West Cornwall Railway is situate on the estate of Penpol;  the residence called Penpol House is very close to the station, and has been the seat of the Milletts and their ancestors for many generations.  The last owner and occupier was the late Rev. John C. Millett, who was found dead in his bed on the morning of the 13th January, 1848, after the family had breakfasted.  He had been a little unwell from indigestion, and was on sick diet the day previous, and took in bed, on retiring to rest at night, a breakfast cup of arrowroot and brandy.  The next morning he was found dead exactly in the same position as that in which he placed himself after taking the arrowroot.  He slept in a room alone.  A coroner’s jury, at an inquest held at Penpol, on the 15th of January, 1848, decided that the cause of the sudden death of the Rev. J. C. Millett was “eating too heartilly,” and they returned a verdict accordingly.

 

            Source: Glasgow Herald (Glasgow) Saturday 30 January 1864.

 

 

Cited in support of the inference that the family of Jacob Curnow Millett (q.v.) were “peculiarly liable to sudden death, from constitutional or other causes”.

 

 

Census

 

1841:  Penpol, Cornwall

 

            Source:  U. K. Census Collection, 1841-1911.

 

 

 

 

33.    RICHARD OKE MILLETT  (1772-1819)

Millett of Marazion

 

Richard Oke Millett was the second child of Richard Oke Millett (1749-1832) and Jane Curnow (about 1742-1806), who married on 3 April 1770 at St Clement, Cornwall.  Richard was born on 23 February 1772 at Bodriggy, Cornwall, and baptised on 25 February 1772 at Phillack, Cornwall.  He lived at Bodriggy.  Richard died, unmarried, on 17 June 1819 at Bodriggy aged 47, and was buried on 26 June 1819 at Phillack.

 

 

A caution to tenants

 

R.O. Millett, esq. and the Rev. J.C. Millett v. W. Jacka.

On the 11th inst. a writ of enquiry of damages was executed at Truro, before Joseph Edwards, esq. Under-Sheriff of this County.  The action was brought for sundry breaches of covenant contained in defendant’s lease which expired at Michaelmas last, such as for not repairing the buildings and fences, for omitting to sow proper grass seed, for cutting the furze at an improper growth, &c. &c. and respectable witnesses having proved the injury sustained, the Jury returned a verdict for £64.

 

Source:  Royal Cornwall Gazette (Truro) Saturday 18 April 1812.

 

 

Will

 

Will of Richard Oke Millett ..................... of Phillack in the County of Cornwall do make and ............ this to be my last will and testament .............. and bequeath one-third part of all my property and effects consisting of money in the ............................. debts out of all and every description to my dear brother John Curnow Millett ........... and Richard Tyark? alias .............. of Godolphin ......... to hold in trust for the sole use and benefit of Leonard Millett, Jacob Curnow Millett, Richard Oke Millett and another son born not baptised sons of the aforesaid John Curnow Millett by his present wife Mary daughter of the late Mr. Honey of Lansallos or to the survivors or survivor of them share and share alike this money to be laid out to the best advantage and security that interest of the same to be added annually to the (that?) principal each child on attaining the age of twenty one years is to be paid his proportion of that said money all the remaining two-thirds of my property and effects and debts out of all and every description
 ........................  give and bequeath to my brother Hannibal Curnow Millett now living in Okehampton but if he should die and leave his .......... before the abovenamed ......................... are to hold in trust this bequest to be ........................ out in the same manner as the first mentioned property for the sole use and to the same interest viz. the interest to be added to the principal and the money to be ............................  and paid as above to the aforementioned four children of John Curnow Millett and Mary his wife and I do hereby nominate and ........ and appoint my brother Hannibal Curnow Millett my whole and sole Executor of this my last will and testament in witness whereof I hereby ..................  affix my hand and seal this twelfth day of ..............................  in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and nineteen.

R. Oke Millett.  Signed ....................................................................................  the said testator as .......   for his last will and testament in the presence of each other ................................ our names as witnesses hereto Horatio Millett Lieut.   Dr. H. ..............................Vivian

Proved at London 4th Oct. 1819 before the .......... by the oath of Hannibal Curnow Millett the brother the sole executor to whom ...............................   was granted leaving....................................................................

 

            Source:  Transcription.

 

 

 

 

34.    GRACE MILLETT  (1772-1868)

Millett of Marazion

 

Grace Millett was the second child of Humphry Millett (1745-1774) and Mary Sandys (1742-1819), who married on 19 December 1765 at Helston, Cornwall.  Grace was born in  1772 at Numis, St Hilary, Cornwall, and baptised on 23 July 1772 at St Hilary.  She married Charles Short (1762-1838) on 6 September 1790 at Madron, Cornwall;  between 1791 and 1805 they had 9 children.  Grace died on 5 December 1868 at Brighton, Sussex aged 96.

 

 

Trevarthian

 

Her life was put up on the lease of Trevarthian estate in St. Hilary in 1781, at the age of nine.

 

            Sources:

Royal Cornwall Gazette (Truro) Thursday 17 December 1868, p. 7.

Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 574.

 

 

Courtship

 

In his account of his life, Charles Short (14 Aug 1762 – 19 Sept 1838) describes his courtship and marriage to Grace Millett, daughter of Humphrey Millett Esquire, of Enis in Cornwall,  thus:

 

 In the year 1789 I first saw Miss Millett at a Ball which the Bar held, at which I was one of the Stewards.  I became acquainted with my future wife.  After the Summer Circuit of 1789 with a view of seeing her again I determined to visit formally and was again introduced to her at Penzance.  Having been accepted by her, I returned to London and continued to work and study diligently, and on the 7th September 1790 was married to her at the parish church of Madron by the Revd. Boulan.

 

 Apparently however, Charles’s path to Miss Millett’s hand was by no means such a simple affair, having first to deal with a rival, and extricate himself from some possibly unfortunate consequences.

 

It would seem that on his journey to Penzance, Charles first called to pay his respects at the house of the Grylls family in Helston – the residence of Thomas Grylls, who Grace’s sister Mary had married in 1786.  There he must have been introduced to Thomas’s younger brother Matthew.  Shortly thereafter, Charles received the following letter:

 

Helston 25th Sept 1789

 

 Sir

 

Little did I think last Sunday when I received you at my house with warm friendship that I was meeting a man who would be the bearer of any uneasiness to me, but so it has since turned out.

 

My partiality for the Lady, who, I find, means to honour you with her hand has been long since known throughout this County, and had any man within the limits of it, knowing my attachment, attempted to supplant me I should have shown that conduct on the occasion which it behoves every true born spirit to adopt.

 

At present I have no grounds for censoring your conduct and without having grounds I flatter myself I am too much of a gentleman to call you to an account, but should I ever find out at a further day, from respectable authority that you had heard of my attachment to the Lady, and that you came down with the intention to supplant me, I shall then most assuredly require that satisfaction from your hands which from the little I know of you as a gentleman I am certain you will give  me without any evasion.

 

 As I am now situated you will excuse my seeing you in your way back, and with a firm resolution of acting in this affair with perfect propriety as far as my judgment will permit, I

subscribe myself

 

Your humble servant

 

Matthew Grylls

 

To which Charles replied in characteristically lawyerly manner:

 

28th Sept 89 Penzance

 

Sir

 

 I take the earliest opportunity in justice to my own character to answer your letter which I received this morning and at once to destroy every suspicion that you may now entertain of my having been so ungenerous as to have visited you with the intention of only taking advantage of your friendship – with that trust which I feel to be due to myself I assure you most solemnly that I do not remember to have at any time or in any manner heard of the attachment you have lately disclosed – whoever shall dare assert to the contrary I assert in plainest terms to be a liar be he whom he may – If I had known it I certainly should not have gone to your house on my way to Penzance.  I feel regret at having been unknowingly the cause of uneasiness to you.  If these assurances content you I am happy and wish that we may still continue on terms of friendship – if not you must follow the dictates of your own conscience.

 

I am your humble servant

 

Charles Short

 

Source:  Paul Roper (email), extracted from the Short Family papers held in the State Library of South Australia, Adelaide.

 

 

 

 

35.    WILLIAM MILLETT  (1774-1829)

Millett of Marazion

 

William Millett was the third child of John Millett (1752-1778) and Sarah Rawle (about 1756-1793), who married on 21 November 1770 at Forrabury, Cornwall.  William was born on 15 November 1774 at St Hilary, and baptised there on 2 March 1777.  He was a surgeon.  He succeeded to Gurlyn on the death of his older brother John Millett (b. 1772) but lived at Marazion, Cornwall.  William  married Josepha Hitchins on 1 March 1800 at St Hilary;  they had five children.  William died on 27 August 1829 at Marazion aged 55, and was buried on 31 August 1829 at St Hilary.

 

 

Death

 

A most melancholy occurrence took place at Marazion on Wednesday morning.  Between the hours of eight and nine o’clock, Mr. William Millett, surgeon of that place, shot himself in his garden.  The fatal instrument used was a fowling-piece, which he contrived to discharge, so as to shoot himself through the head.  The unfortunate gentleman had previously exhibited symptoms of a disordered mind.

Source:   The Western Flying Post; or, Sherborne and Yeovil Mercury (Sherborne, Dorset) Sunday 31 August 1829, p. 4.

 

 

 

 

36.    HANNIBAL CURNOW MILLETT  (1776-1865)

Millett of Marazion

 

Hannibal Curnow Millett was the fourth child of Richard Oke Millett (1749-1832) and Jane Curnow (1742-1806), who married on 3 April 1770 at St Clement, Cornwall.  Hannibal was born on 11 November 1776 at Bodriggy, Cornwall, and baptised on 10 June 1777 at Phillack, Cornwall.  He lived in Okehampton, Devon, and between 1821 and 1844 was 10 times Mayor of Okehampton.  He was a Partner in the 1849 Deed in the Cornish Copper Company, and for a time was a member of the CCC Committee.  Hannibal died, unmarried, on 3 May 1865 at Okehampton aged 89.

 

 

Dissolution of partnership

 

Notice is hereby given, that the Copartnership lately subsisting between Richard Oke Millett, Hannibal Curnow Millett, John Prideaux, Margaret Banfield, (as Executrix of Richard Banfield, deceased,) William Ninnis, Roger Vivian, and Francis Rawle, in the Trades or Businesses of a Merchant and Cooper, and carried on in Bodriggy Cellars, at Hayle, in the Parish of Phillack, in the County of Cornwall, under the Firm of John Prideaux and Co. was on the 25th of December 1809, dissolved by mutual Consent.—All Debts owing to and from the said late Partnership will respectively be received and paid by John Prideaux, at Hayle.
Witness our Hands this 5th Day of October 1810.

 

Source:  London Gazette 6 November 1810, p. 1771.

 

 

Censuses

 

1841, 1851, 1861:  Back Street, Okehampton, Devon (baker, agent to landowners, fundholder etc.)

 

            Source:  U. K. Census Collection, 1841-1911.

 

 

 

 

37.    LEONARD MILLETT  (1778-1798)

Millett of Marazion

 

Leonard Millett was the fifth child of Richard Oke Millett (1749-1832) and Jane Curnow (1742-1806), who married on 3 April 1770 at St Clement, Cornwall.  Leonard was born on 8 September 1778 at Bodriggy, Cornwall, and was baptised on 18 September 1778 at Phillack, Cornwall.  He died, unmarried, on either 8 October 1797 or 5 April 1798 (see below) aged 19 or 20.

 

 

Death

 

The Princess Amelia, Capt. John Ramsden was burnt by accident off Pigeon Island, on the Malabar Coast, on the 5th of April, 1798, about 40 of the crew were unfortunately lost.  ... Those drowned:  Mr. L. Millett, 5th Mate ...

 

Source:  St James’s Chronicle, or, British Evening Post (London) 21 August 1798.

 

 

Painting

 

The British Library holds a painting by Leonard Millett, “View of Bombay Fort from the Harbour”, showing St Thomas’s church, the Custom House and flag staff, with shipping in the foreground, painted c. 1797, which has inscribed on the reverse:  “Drawn by Leonard Millett the Son of Richard Oke Millett.  Penpol Hayle.  Leonard Millett was blown up and killed in the Princess Charlotte at Bombay with many others or nearly all of the crew – about 1797”.  According to the British Library note:  “The Royal Charlotte was an extra ship hired by EIC agents, along with the Isabella and Britannia, to carry gunpowder to the Cape.  The Commander of the Royal Charlotte said his insurance policy would become invalid by lading with gunpowder and demanded Government indemnity in the event of loss.  The gunpowder, piled up round the main mast, was struck by lightning at Kedgeree on 8 October 1797 and all on board, numbering more than 140 people, perished in the resulting explosion.  The loss to the EIC totalled 29,437 rupees.

 

Source:  India Office Select Materials Record WD3867. http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/indiaofficeselect/welcome.asp.

 

 

It is not known which account of Leonard Millett’s death is correct.

 

 

 

 

38.    ROBERT MILLETT  (1788-1844)

Millett of Marazion

 

Robert Millett was the second child of Robert Millett (1757-1819) and Mary Hockin, who married on 7 September 1785 at Illogan, Cornwall.  Robert was born on 10 March 1788 at Marazion, and baptised there on 28 April 1788.  He was a chandler.  Robert married Ann Richards (1792-1872) on 19 January 1818 at Illogan; between 1818 and 1835 they had 12 children.  Robert died on 17 August 1844 at Penzance, Cornwall aged 56, and was buried on 22 August 1844 at Marazion.

 

 

Dissolution of partnership

 

Notice is hereby given, that the Partnership lately carried on at the Town of Marazion, in the County of Cornwall, between William Cornish, Merchant, and Robert Millett, Tallow-Chandler, both of the said Town of Marazion, under the firm of Robert Millett and Company, Tallow-Chandlers, is this day dissolved by mutual consent.—Dated the 8th day of June 1826.

 

Source:  London Gazette 13 June 1826, p. 1449.

 

 

Census

 

1841:  Fore Street, Marazion, Cornwall

 

            Source:  U. K. Census Collection, 1841-1911.

 

 

 

 

39.    WILLIAM MILLETT  (1789-1841)

Millett of Marazion

 

William Millett was the third child of William Millett (1759-1791) and Elizabeth Stidiford (1757-1838), who married on 7 October 1784 at St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly.  William was born about October 1789, and baptised on 11 November 1789 in Scilly.  He joined the Honourable East India Company’s Maritime Service, in which he reached the rank of Captain.  William married Mary Millett (1800-1887) on 13 December 1825 at Phillack, Cornwall;  they did not have any children.  William died on 14 June 1841 at Leamington, Warwickshire aged 52, and was buried there on 16 June 1841.

 

 

Maritime service

 

Pursar Bengal (3) 1811/12 and 1813/14, Marchioness of Ely 1815/16, 1817/18, 1819/20, 1821/2 and 1823/4.

 

Source:  Farrington, Anthony.  A biographical index of East India Company Maritime Service officers 1600-1834.  London, British Library, 1999, p. 543.

 

 

Census

 

1841:  Bath Street, Leamington, Warwickshire

 

            Source:  U. K. Census Collection, 1841-1911.

 

 

 

 

40.    GEORGE THOMAS MILLETT  (1790-1824)

Millett of Bosavern

 

George Thomas Millett was the ninth child of John Millett (1749-1815) and Eliza Smith (about 1756-1836), who married on 20 March 1777 at Mylor, Cornwall.  George was born on 3 March 1790, and was baptised on 3 June 1790 at St Just-in-Penwith.  He was a surgeon in the Royal Navy.  He died of palsy, unmarried, on 23 September 1824 at Bosavern, St Just-in-Penwith aged 34, and was buried at St Just-in-Penwith on 29 September 1824.

 

 

Monument

 

Monument in church, St Just-in-Penwith, with poetical inscription by Rev. C. V. Le Grice of Trereife, Penzance, Cornwall.

 

Source:  Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 577.

 

 

Sacred to the memory of George Thomas Millett, Surgeon,
fifth son of John Millett, Esq. of Bosavern in this Parish,
who died Sept, 23rd 1824.  Aged 34 years.

 

With health while glowing, sudden palsey came
To blast the vigour of his manly frame;
But faith, and hope, as Angels near his bed,
Made smooth the Pillow for his drooping head;
Taught him, with hallowing lips, the rod to kiss,
And know that sorrow is the path to bliss:
Tho’ yet in life, to feel himself in death,
And, anxious for the summons, yield his breath.


                                                              C.V.L.G.

 

This memorial is erected by his sisters, in testimony of their affection.

 

Source:  Buller, John.  A statistical account of the Parish of Saint Just in Penwith in the County of Cornwall, with some notice of its ecclesiastical and druidical antiquities.  Penzance, R. D. Rodda, 1842, p. 36.  http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=s4kLAAAAYAAJ.

 

 

 

 

41.    RICHARD MILLETT  (1791-1828)

Millett of Bosavern

 

Richard Millett was the tenth child of John Millett (1749-1815) and Eliza Smith (about 1756-1836), who married on 20 March 1777 at Mylor, Cornwall.  Richard was born on 6 September 1791, and baptised on 6 September 1791 (private baptism) and 5 November 1793 (public baptism) at St Just-in-Penwith, Cornwall.  He served in the Royal Navy, reaching the rank of Lieutenant.  On 3 August 1811 he was very seriously wounded in an engagement in H.M.S. Raven near the island of Nordeney in the North Sea, during the Peninsular War.  Richard died, unmarried, in July 1828 at Bosavern aged 37, and was buried on 18 July 1828 at St Just-in-Penwith.

 

 

Wounding

 

Shot through the stomach during the Spanish war, the bullet passing through him and killing a man behind him on board H.M.S. Raven, Aug. 1811.

 

Source:  Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 577.

 

 

Account of battle

 

His Majesty’s Ship Quebec, Heligoland, August 6, 1811.

S I R,


I have to acquaint you with a very gallant Achievement, (the Capture of a Division of the Enemy’s Gun-Boats,) which has been performed by Boats from this Part of your Squadron, under the Direction of the First Lieutenant, Samuel Blyth of the Quebec, who had the Honour to command a Party of brave Officers and Men that nobly seconded him.


The Weather was particularly fine and settled for this Kind of Service, and they had already captured and sent to me a Vaisseau de Guerre of the Douanes Imperiales, manned with an Officer and Twelve Men, (one of them was killed before he surrendered;) and a Merchant Vessel which they were towing out, when being near the Island of Nordeney, on the 3d., Four of the Enemy’s Gun-Boats were seen at Anchor within.


The Enemy silently waited the Attack, their Guns loaded with Grape and Cannister, (not using any Round Shot,) until the Boats were within Pistol Range, when a Discharge took place from their whole Line.  The first Vessel was immediately boarded and carried, but the other with great Bravery maintained themselves, severally, until they found their Vessels were no longer in their own Possession.


The Loss sustained was, on our Side, Four killed and Fourteen wounded, on that of the Enemy Two killed and Twelve wounded.


The Officers employed were  ...  Midshipman Richard Millett, Raven, Very severely wounded.  ...


I have the Honour to be, &c.


(Signed)  CHARLES HAWTAYNE, Captain


To William Young Esq; Admiral of the White, &c. &c. &c.

 

Sources: 

London Gazette 24 August 1811, p. 1669.

Gentleman’s Magazine, and Historical Chronicle v. 81 pt. 2, September 1811, p. 269-270.  https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015027527392;view=1up;seq=293.

 

 

 

 

42.    JOHN BOULDERSON MILLETT  (1791-1870)

Millett of Marazion

 

John Boulderson Millett was the son of John Millett (1759-1836) and Mary Boulderson (about 1754-1848), who married on 2 January 1791 at Constantine, Cornwall.  John was born about 1791 at Truro, and baptised there on 21 November 1791.  He joined the Royal Navy, in which he reached the rank of Captain.  He resided at Falmouth, Cornwall.  John married first Elizabeth Davy (1788-1830) on 25 August 1817 at Madron, Cornwall;  between 1818 and 1825 they had 3 children.  John married second Anna Maria Cole (about 1808-1875) on 16 April 1832;  between 1834 and 1842 they had 4 children.  John died on 3 May 1870 at Plymouth, Devon, aged 79.

 

 

Naval career

 

MILLETT.  (Lieut., 1815.  F-P., 19;  H-P., 22)

 

John Millett entered the Navy, 19 Feb. 1806, as midshipman, on board the EXPERIMENT receiving-ship at Falmouth, Lieut-Commanders Jas. Manderson and Jas. Fagan;  and in the course of the same year, after having cruized for a short time in the GIBRALTAR 80, Capt. Wm. Lukin,  joined the MARS 74, commanded at first by the same officer, and next by Capts. Jas. Katon, John Surman Carden, and Henry Roper.  Continuing in that ship until April, 1812, he served with a squadron under Sir Sam. Hood at the capture, off Rochefort, 25 Sept. 1806, of four heavy French frigates, two of which, the Gloire 46 and Infatigable 44, struck to the MARS – accompanied the expedition of 1807 to Copenhagen, where, throughout the siege, he was actively employed in command of the boats – was much engaged in affording protection to the Baltic trade – and when at Lisbon, in 1810, was sent on shore on detached service at Fort St. Juliao.  After a short attachment at Portsmouth to the GOLIATH 74, Capt. Edw. Leveson Gower, he removed in June, 1812, to the COSSACK 22, Capt. Wm. King, off Cadiz; and in Dec. of the same year he became Master’s Mate of the ABOUKIR 74, Capts. Geo. Parker and Norborne Thompson.  In that ship, in April 1814, Mr. Millett witnessed the fall of Genoa.  He took up, in May, 1815, a commission bearing date 15 Feb. in that year;  was next, from 22 Jan. 1825 until May, 1827, employed in the Coast Blockade as Supernumerary-Lieutenant of the RAMILLIES 74, Capts. Wm. M’Culloch and Hugh Pigot; and since 24 Oct. 1840 has been in command of a station in the Coast Guard.  He married, 16 Apr. 1832, a daughter of  – Cole, Esq, Purser and Paymaster R.N.

 

Source:  O’Byrne, William R.  A naval biographical dictionary: comprising the life and services of every living officer in Her Majesty’s Navy, from the rank of Admiral of the Fleet to that of Lieutenant, inclusive.  Polstead, Suffolk, J. B. Hayward & Son, 1849, p. 761-762.  https://archive.org/details/cu31924027921372.



Inquest and Trial

 

INQUEST

Lydd, Kent, Saturday 20 August 1825

 

An inquest was held at Lydd, on Saturday last, on the body of a man named Carpenter, who was accidentally shot on the night of the 11th inst. by Lieut. J. Millett, employed at the coast-guard station near Dungeness, when a verdict was returned of Wilful Murder.  On the verdict being given, the Coroner said, “Gentlemen, before we separate, and your verdict goes before the world, I take this opportunity publicly to mention my total dissent from the verdict you have just delivered.  Not one tittle of evidence has been brought forward which can justify it”. – Hampshire Telegraph.

 

Source:  Oxford University and City Herald Saturday 27 August 1825, p. 4 col. D para 2.

 

KENT WINTER ASSIZES

Maidstone, Monday 2 January 1826

Before Mr. Baron Hullock

 

The Grand Jury having ignored a bill of indictment against Lieutenant Millett. of his Majesty’s ship Ramillies, for the wilful murder of Robert Carpenter, at Lydd, on the 11th of August, by shooting him with a pistol, the Lieutenant (who had been admitted to bail, and now surrendered) remained to be tried upon the Coroner’s inquisition;  but before he was arraigned,

 

Mr. Baron Hullock intimated that he had great difficulty in putting the defendant upon his trial, in consequence of an objection apparent on the face of the Coroner’s inquisition.  The inquisition alleged that the deceased came by his death in consequence of the act of “ ----- Millett, Lieutenant on board his Majesty’s ship Ramillies”, without giving the Lieutenant his Christian name, or even averring that the Ramillies was within the body of the county.  Unless this objection could be removed, he thought he ought not to arraign the defendant.

 

Mr. Adolphus and Mr. Marsham, for the prosecution, submitted that there was sufficient certainty in the description of the defendant to put him on his trial.  Every intendment must be made in favour of the Coroner’s inquisition, which, though traversable, was in the nature of judicial record.  It was impossible for the Coroner, perhaps, to ascertain the Christian name of the party accused.  Here was certainty enough;  and it was for the defendant to show that he was not the party intended.  Suppose a prisoner, upon being examined before the Coroner, or a Magistrate, refused to give his Christian name, it would be sufficient to describe him as a person whose name was unknown.  Suppose the defendant to be tried and acquitted on this inquisition, and should afterwards be indicted, he might plead such acquittal in bar of indictment.

 

Mr. Sergeant Onslow and  Mr. Knox, for the defendant, were stopped by Mr. Baron Hullock, who was clearly of opinion, that the description of the prisoner was too uncertain to justify him in permitting the trial to proceed.  It would have been very easy to ascertain the defendant’s Christian name.  This was not like the case where a party refuses to give his name;  for in such cases the refusal and the identity of the accused might be made matter of averment and evidence.  Here there was no refusal of that kind suggested, and therefore there was no satisfactory answer to the objection;  without adverting to any other objections apparent on the record, it was sufficient to say, that the defendant ought not to be tried on this inquisition.

 

The inquisition was ordered to be quashed, and the defendant was discharged.

 

Sources:  The Morning Post Thursday 5 January 1826, p. 2 col. D;  The Morning Chronicle Thursday 5 January 1826, p. 3 col. D;  The Times Thursday 5 January 1826, p. 3 col. B.



Wife

 

According to Collectanea Cornubiensia, Anna Maria Cole was the second wife not of John Boulderson Millett but of his father John Millett of Truro.  I think this is incorrect.  Boase’s source was W. R. O’Byrne, A naval biographical dictionary (1849), whose entry for “John Millett” is, I believe, referring to John Boulderson Millett.

 

Sources:

Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 569.

O’Byrne, William R.  A naval biographical dictionary: comprising the life and services of every living officer in Her Majesty’s Navy, from the rank of Admiral of the Fleet to that of Lieutenant, inclusive.  Polstead, Suffolk, J. B. Hayward & Son, 1849, p. 761-762.  https://archive.org/details/cu31924027921372.

 

 

Census

 

1861:  33 Clifton Place, Charles-the-Martyr, Devon (retired commander R. N.)

 

            Source:  U. K. Census Collection, 1841-1911.

 

 

 

 

43.    CHARLES MILLETT  (1792-1873)

Millett of Marazion

 

Charles Millett was the third child of George Millett (1762-1816) and Elizabeth Coggan (about 1764-1823), who married on 21 October 1786 at St Andrew Undershaft, Leadenhall Street, London.  Charles was born on 17 February 1792 at Hatton Garden, London, and baptised on 14 April 1792 at Wanstead, Essex.  He was educated at Haileybury College, Haileybury, Hertfordshire, and served in the H.E.I.C. (Honourable East India Company) in China from 1809-1834.  He married Anne Crohan (1812-1899) on 17 May 1834 at St George’s, Hanover Square, London;  between 1835 and 1851 they had 12 children.  Charles died on 28 May 1873 at 29 Queen’s Gate Terrace, Kensington, London aged 81.

 

 

Life

 

Charles Millett served under the Honourable East India Company in China, and retired upon the Charter being taken away from the China establishment.  Afterwards he resided at Hill place, Hants, and Maiden Erlegh near Reading.

 

Source:  Boase, George Clement.  Collectanea Cornubiensia: a collection of biographical and topographical notes relating to the County of Cornwall.  Truro, Netherton and Worth, 1890, col. 570.

 

 

Papers

 

The letter book of Charles Millett, Supercargo at Canton, containing summaries of letters written by him on his business and other private concerns, covering the period 1824-1827, is held at the British Library (MSS Eur B408).

 

Source:  India Office Select Materials Record Mss Eur B408. http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/indiaofficeselect/welcome.asp.

 

 

Address of Appreciation

 

To William Baynes, Charles Millett, and James Bannerman, Esqrs.

 

Gentlemen,– We, the undersigned British merchants in Canton, have heard with sincere regret the changes which have taken place, involving your retirement from the direction of affairs in this country;  and cannot refrain from expressing to you our sentiments on the occasion.

 

While impressed with an unqualified conviction of the purity and disinterestedness of your motives throughout the whole of your negotiations to promote the prosperity of the East India Company’s trade, which you have wisely considered as identified with the general interests of British commerce, we have, at the same time, to express our approbation of the principle of your policy, which experience has proved to be the best calculated to prevent the systematic encroachments of the local authorities, ever on the watch to increase their oppressions when submitted to, but ready to yield to firmness founded on propriety and reason.

 

Called upon by the Bombay government at the solicitation of the commercial community of the presidency, your exertions were directed to obtain relief from the increasing exactions which threatened the extinction of their trade with this empire;  and to your continued firmness in the pursuit of this object, they are indebted for important advantages.  We would likewise record our grateful sense of the ready co-operation at all times afforded in our attempts to improve our commercial relations with the Chinese, to remove the disabilities to which we have been subjected, and the indignities so long and so pertinaciously heaped upon us, derogatory alike to British feeling and national character;  our warmest acknowledgments are equally due for your strenuous efforts to ameliorate the condition of society, with reference to the residence of families in Canton, and the general comfort of the community.

 

In thus conveying our sentiments on your quitting the direction of affairs, we confidently hope that the policy of your successors will not only maintain the advantages already gained, but, if possible, extend them whenever the interests of our country may call for similar perseverance and exertions.

 

With sincerest wishes for your health, happiness, and future welfare, we are, with much esteem, Gentlemen, your faithful and obedient servants,

            (Signed, 31 signatures)

 

Canton, 26th Nov. 1830.

 

 

Response to the Address

 

To the British Merchants in China.

 

Gentlemen,– We have received your address, and beg to return you our best thanks for the handsome manner in which you have come forward with this expression of your sentiments in approbation of our conduct while entrusted with the direction of the Honourable Company’s affairs in this country.

 

You, gentlemen, who have been resident in China, can best appreciate the necessity that existed for our exertions to place the trade on a better and more secure footing.

 

We are consoled in the reflection of having done our duty to the best of our judgment and ability, while acting as guardians of the important interests of the East India Company, and endeavouring to support the honour and national character of Great Britain.

 

We assure you, that whatever changes may await us, your kindness, evinced at this moment, will ever be remembered with feelings of the warmest gratitude.  Accept our sincere regards.

 

We remain, gentlemen, your much obliged and obedient servants,

 

                        William Baynes,

                        Charles Millett,

                        James Bannerman.

 

Canton, Nov. 29, 1830.

 

Source:  The Standard (London) Saturday 2 April 1831, p. 1 cols. D-E (from the Canton Register 4 December 1830).

 

 

Censuses

 

1841:  Hill Place, Droxford, Hampshire

1851:  Maiden Erlegh, Wokingham, Berkshire (landholder)

1861:  33 Grosvenor Street, Hanover Square, London (landholder)

1871:  18 The Cedars, Putney, Surrey (East India Civil Service, retired)

 

            Source:  U. K. Census Collection, 1841-1911.

 

 

 

 

44.    GEORGE MILLETT  (1793-1850)

Millett of Marazion

 

George Millett was the fourth child of George Millett (1762-1816) and Elizabeth Coggan (about 1764-1823), who married on 21 October 1786 at St Andrew Undershaft, Leadenhall Street, London.  George was born on 24 July 1793 at Norfolk Street, St Pancras, London, and baptised on 14 September 1793 at Wanstead, Essex.  He graduated B.A. from Trinity College Cambridge in 1814, was a Fellow of Christ’s College, and graduated M.A. in 1817.  He was a clergyman, Chaplain to the Lord Bishop of Ripon, and Vicar of Silkstone, Yorkshire, from 1845 to 1850.  He married Eliza Amelia Agnew (1795-1868) on 31 December 1818 at Cheam Church, Surrey;  between 1822 and 1831 they had 5 children.  George died on 26 April 1850 at Silkstone aged 57, and was buried there on 2 May 1850.

 

 

Life and death

 

Admitted to Trinity College, University of Cambridge 26 April 1810;  Matriculated Michaelmas Term 1810;  Scholar 1811;  B.A. (15th Wrangler) 1814;  1st Chancellor’s Medal 1814;  Fellow of Christ’s College 1814;  M.A. 1817.  Ordained deacon (London) 1 June 1817;  priest 21 December 1817.  Vicar of Silkstone, Yorkshire 1845-1850, and Chaplain to the Bishop of Ripon.  Died 29 April 1850, aged 56, at Silkstone.

 

Source:  Cambridge University Alumni, 1261-1900.

 

 

Census

 

1841:  Brighton, Sussex (clergyman)

 

            Source:  U. K. Census Collection, 1841-1911.

 

 

 

 

45.    HENRY MILLETT  (1795-1834)

Millett of Marazion

 

Henry Millett was the fifth child of George Millett (1762-1816) and Elizabeth C