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THOMAS UPTON

 

            Born about 1662 in Lincolnshire.

            Married Judith ?

 

            Children, including:

 

 

HENRY UPTON

 

Born 1700 at Silk Willoughby, Lincolnshire, baptised 11 August 1700 at Silk Willoughby.

            Married on 25 May 1725 at Swaton, Lincolnshire SARAH PADGET.

            Died May 1741 at Swaton.

           

            8 children, including:

 

 

HENRY UPTON

 

            Born 1726 at Swaton, Lincolnshire, baptised 18 October 1726 at Swaton.

            Married MARY ?

            Died December 1788 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire.

 

            5 children, including:

 

 

JOHN UPTON

 

            Born 1754 at Swaton, Lincolnshire, baptised 14 May 1754 at Swaton.

            Married in 1789 at Swaton MARY SMITH.

 

            3 children, including:

 

 

HENRY UPTON

 

            Born 27 December 1789 at Swaton, Lincolnshire.

Publican.

Married on 12 June 1815 at Aslackby, Lincolnshire SARAH LUNN, born about 1797 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire, baptised 15 October 1797 at Spalding, Lincolnshire, died 1874 at Pinchbeck.

Died May 1847 at Pinchbeck.

 

            10 children, including:

 

 

HENRY UPTON

           

Born 1816 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire, baptised 18 August 1816 at Pinchbeck.

            Surveyor and farmer.

 

Married on 27 November 1837 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire REBECCA TASKER, baptised 6 December 1814 at East Kirby, Lincolnshire, daughter of Parker Tasker (1790-1875) and Susanna Woods (born about 1791);  died 1905 at Oundle, Northamptonshire.

 

Died 31 October 1866 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire.

 

9  children:

 

 

(1)  ELIZA BROWN UPTON

 

            Born 1838 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire.

 

 

(2)  WILLIAM BROWN UPTON

 

            Born 1840 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire.

 

Emigrated to New Zealand on 11 September 1858 on the ship Evening Star, arriving in Auckland on 21 December 1858.

 

            Bookseller and stationer.

 

Married on 16 August 1866 at Auckland SOPHIA WALL, born 27 April 1843 at Kororareka, Northland, daughter of Edward Wall (1818-1877) and Elizabeth Gorrie (1818-1905);  died 22 May 1920 at Auckland.

 

Died 12 September 1870 at Auckland.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

            1861:  Franklin, Auckland

1866/67, 1867/68, 1868/69, 1869/70:  Union Street, Auckland

1870/71:  Union Street, Auckland;  Hobson Street, Auckland

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981

 

            Obituary

 

Quite a gloom was cast over the whole community yesterday by the death of Mr. W. B. Upton, senior partner of the firm of Upton Brothers.  Mr. Upton was generally respected and esteemed, no less for his sterling qualities as a citizen than for excellence of his character as a business man.  Devoted to his business as he was, he had displayed great enterprise and rare skill in providing for the wants of the reading portion of the community, and the brother who survives him will, we feel sure, often miss the judiciousness, discernment, and rare business capacity which had been chiefly instrumental in achieving that success, from the full enjoyment of which Mr. Upton is cut off.  The firm had only recently removed into more commodious premises, and it is believed that the worry and excitement attendant upon the work of arranging the new premises caused the illness from which Mr. Upton died.  Though by no means of a robust constitution, he always displayed remarkable industry, his devotion to business rendering him perhaps less careful with regard to his health than was prudent.  He leaves a wife and young family to mourn his untimely death, and his memory will be reverenced by a very large circle of friends who had learned to respect him.  The funeral will leave his late residence at three o’clock to-day.

 

                        Source:  Daily Southern Cross Tuesday 13 September 1870, p. 2 col. F.

 

We refer with sorrow to the untimely death of Mr. W. B. Upton, of the firm of Upton Brothers, booksellers, of this city.  Mr. Upton had been a pashing and enterprising citizen for some years past, and leaves a widow and family to deplore his loss.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 13 September 1870, p. 2.

 

Dissolution of Partnership

 

Notice is hereby given that the Partnership lately carried on by William Brown Upton and John Henry Upton, under the style of W. B. and J. H. Upton, as Booksellers and Stationers, in Queen-street, Auckland, was dissolved on the 12th day of September last;  and that the business of the late partnership will in future be carried on under the same style by John Henry Upton, by whom all debts due to and by the late partnership will be received and paid.  Auckland, January 24, 1871.

 

                        J. H. Upton,

                        Sophia Upton,

                        Administrators of the Estate of W. B. Upton, deceased.

 

Source:  Daily Southern Cross Wednesday 17 May 1871, p. 1 col. F

 

2 children: 

 

(1)  HENRY UPTON

 

Born 19 June 1867 at Auckland.

Farmer.

 

Married (1) on 15 December 1897 at Dunedin MARIANNA SCOTT, born 13 March 1866 at New Plymouth, daughter of John Scott (1828-1905) and Ann Hamilton (1834-1909);  died 12 July 1902 at Ponsonby, Auckland.  No children.

 

Married (2) on 27 April 1904 at Hamilton BESSIE HENRIETTA SANDES, born 18 March 1868, daughter of Robert Fitzmaurice Gordon Sandes (1843-1937) and Catherine Bond Peed (1845-1908);  died 17 November 1963 at Auckland.

 

Died 16 July 1951 at Auckland.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

1896:  St Mary’s Road, St Mary’s Bay, Auckland (engineer)

1899, 1900:  St Margaret’s Road, Auckland (engineer)

1905/06, 1908:  Hamilton (engineer)

1911, 1914:  Anglesea Street, Hamilton (engineer)

1919, 1922:  “Woodlands”, East Tamaki, Auckland (farmer)

1925, 1928, 1931, 1935:  East Tamaki, Auckland (farmer)

1938, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1949:  29 Carruth Road, Papatoetoe, Auckland (farmer)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

1890/91:  St Asaph Street, Christchurch

1902:  St Mary’s Road, Ponsonby, Auckland

1904, 1907, 1910:  Hamilton (engineer)

1913:  Anglesea Street, Hamilton (manager, Niven & Co)

1916, 1920:  Te Poi, Matamata (settler)

1926, 1930, 1933, 1936, 1938:  East Tamaki, Auckland (farmer)

1942, 1946, 1947, 1950-51:  29 Carruth Road, Papatoetoe, Auckland

1954:  53 Carruth Road, Papatoetoe, Auckland

 

Source:  New Zealand City and Area Directories, 1866-1954.

 

3 children: 

 

(1)  Norman Sandes Upton

 

Born 30 December 1904 at Hamilton, Waikato.

Insurance clerk.

 

Married (1) on 18 November 1930 at Pukekohe, Auckland Doris Beatrice Wright, born 7 April 1905 at Pukekohe, daughter of Adolphus Wright (1870-1943) and Ellen Matilda Roose (1871-1958);  died 1 January 1960 at Auckland.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

1928:  East Tamaki, Auckland (clerk)

1938, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1949, 1954, 1957, 1960, 1963, 1966, 1969:  21 Winstone Road, Mount Roskill, Auckland (clerk)

1972, 1975, 1978, 1981:  21 Winstone Road, Mount Roskill, Auckland (retired)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

Service with South British Insurance Company Ltd

 

Retired in 1965 after 45 years of service.

 

Source:  Vennell, C. W.  Risks and rewards: a policy of enterprise 1872-1972: a centennial history of the South British Insurance Company Limited.  Auckland, Wilson and Horton, 1972, p. 350.

 

Upton Family

 

History traced of early Auckland family

 

Roskill Masonic Village resident Norman Upton’s 100th birthday is celebrated with a genealogical display showing the accomplishments of his forebears and relatives.  Son Gordon set up the presentation to honour his father’s family history.

 

“My father's birthday was on December 30.  As celebrations on this date were impractical, we have mounted an Upton Genealogical History in New Zealand”, says Mr Upton.

 

“William Brown Upton was our first to come to New Zealand, where he opened shop in Queen St in 1863, and then as family rumour has it, he persuaded his younger brother, John Henry Upton, to follow him to the colonies and escape England’s freezing cold.  John Henry was an active person, and also mayor of Auckland from 1889 to 1891, and the initiator of the mayoral chain, which still bears his Maltese Cross as its hub”.

 

Members of the Upton family once lived in Herne Bay, near the Pt Erin baths, and the suburb’s Upton St is named after John Henry.

 

Norman Upton is the village’s oldest resident, and retains a sharp, inquiring mind.  The former Freemason remembers scoping out the site when the Masons were first considering opening a resthome.

 

Gordon Upton says he found it fascinating researching his family’s genealogy.  The family has always maintained a keen interest in higher education, and Gordon says assembling the illustrated history of his forebears was made easier by his newfound fascination with computers.  He intends to set up a website of the family’s history.

 

Source:  Central Leader (Auckland) Friday 21 January 2005, p. 7.

 

1 child: 

Gordon Wright Upton, born 24 August 1931 at Auckland.

Married Jill Robinson.

Died 11 June 2009.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

1954, 1957:  21 Winstone Road, Mt Roskill, Auckland (engineer)
1960, 1963:  51 Hillcrest Road, Glen Eden, Auckland (works manager, manager)
1966:  83 Hillcrest Road, Glen Eden, Auckland (manager)
1969, 1972:  83 Shetland Street, Glen Eden, Auckland (manager, company director)
1975, 1978:  94 Burnley Terrace, Sandringham, Auckland (company director)
1981:  23c Hillsborough Road, Hillsborough, Auckland (company director)


Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

3 children:  Simon Upton, Andrew Upton, Fiona Upton.

 

Married (2) Lizzie Webb.  No children.

 

Died  26 December 2005.

 

 

                                    (2)  Alice Mary Upton

                                               

Born 13 February 1906 at Auckland.

 

Married on 24 March 1931 at Howick, Auckland Laurie Somerville Montgomerie, born 30 October 1900 at Auckland, son of James Montgomerie and Elizabeth Colville Wallace (1870-1961);  died 26 April 1988 at Auckland.

 

Died 26 April 1988 at Auckland.

 

Residence in New Zealand

           

1928:  East Tamaki, Auckland (spinster)

1931, 1935, 1938, 1941, 1943:  Kirkbride Road, Mangere, Auckland (married)

1946, 1949, 1954, 1957, 1960:  Ihumatao Road, Mangere, Auckland (married)

1963, 1966, 1969, 1972, 1975, 1978, 1981:  192 Ihumatao Road, Mangere, Auckland (married)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

 

                                    (3)  Henry Maurice Upton

                                               

Born 13 June 1908 at Hamilton, Waikato.

Farmer.

 

Married in 1937 Adolie Nancy Cunnold, born 22 April 1914 at Otahuhu, Auckland, daughter of Edward Parry Cunnold (1874-1943) and Adolie Hilda Smales (1878-1975);  died 2 July 2003.

           

Died 19 September 1982 at Auckland.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

1931, 1935, 1938, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1949, 1954:  East Tamaki, Auckland (farmer)

1957, 1960, 1963:  Baverstock Road, East Tamaki, Auckland  (farmer)

1966:  2 Pleasant Place, Howick, Auckland (retired)

1969, 1972, 1975, 1978, 1981:  4 Pleasant Place, Mellons Bay, Auckland (retired)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1851-1981.

 

3 children:  John Maurice Upton, Bruce Robert Upton, Rosalind Denise Upton.

 

 

(2)  ALICE UPTON

 

            Born 2 November 1868 at Auckland.

 

Married on 2 October 1899 at Ponsonby, Auckland THOMAS SIMSON, born 13 July 1867 in Dunedin, son of Andrew Simson (1839-1898) and Ann Livingstone (1841-1912);  died 21 February 1936 at Auckland.

 

Died 29 December 1948 at Auckland.

           

                                    New Zealand Residence

 

                                    1896:  St Mary’s Road, St Mary’s Bay, Auckland (domestic duties)

1905/06, 1908, 1911, 1914, 1919:  Mt St John Avenue, Epsom,   Auckland (married)

1922, 1925, 1928, 1931, 1935:  51 Mt St John Avenue, Epsom, Auckland (married)

1938, 1941, 1943, 1946:  51 Mt St John Avenue, Epsom, Auckland (widow)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

 

(3)  ALBERT UPTON

 

            Born 1841 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire.

 

Married on 11 May 1865 at Pinchbeck ELIZA CAULTON, born 20 February 1841 at Crowland, Lincolnshire, died 1912 at Leicester, Leicestershire.

 

Died 23 September 1875 at Spalding, Lincolnshire.

 

6 children:  Ellen Upton (born 1866);  Frances Mary Upton (1868-1893);  Eliza Upton (born 1869);  Albert Upton (1871-1872);  William Henry Upton (1872-1895);  Alice Upton (born 1874).

 

 

(4)  MARY ANNE UPTON

 

            Born 1843 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire.

 

           

(5)  JOHN HENRY UPTON

 

            Born 30 May 1845 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire.

 

Emigrated to New Zealand on 10 August 1866 on the ship Chile, arriving in Auckland on 4 December 1866.

 

Bookseller and stationer;  company director.

Auckland City Councillor 1884-1885, Mayor of Auckland 18 December 1889-16 December 1891.

 

Married on 9 May 1870 at Auckland ELEANOR GORRIE, born 17 February 1848 at Auckland, daughter of William Gorrie (1786-1861) and Mary Maria Morton (1810-1877);  died 14 October 1929 at Auckland.

 

Died 28 May 1929 at Parnell, Auckland.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

1869/70:  Union Street, Auckland

1870/71:  Hobson Street, Auckland

1875/76, 1880/81, 1890, 1893, 1896, 1900, 1905/06, 1908:  Shelly Beach Road, St Mary’s Bay, Auckland (stationer)

1911:  49 Shelly Beach Road, St Mary’s Bay (retired)

1914, 1919, 1922:  St Stephens Avenue, Parnell, Auckland (director)

1925, 1928:  5 St Stephens Avenue, Parnell, Auckland (company director)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

1876:  Shelly Beach Road, Ponsonby, Auckland (bookseller & stationer)

1878-79:  Dedwood (Ponsonby), Auckland (bookseller & stationer)

1881:  Shelly Beach Road, Ponsonby, Auckland

1907, 1910, 1913:  49 Shelly Beach Road, Ponsonby, Auckland (bookseller)

1916:  5 St Stephens Avenue, Parnell, Auckland (bookseller)

1920:  5 St Stephens Avenue, Parnell, Auckland

1923, 1926:  5 St Stephens Avenue, Parnell, Auckland (director, Bank of New Zealand)

1930:  5 St Stephens Avenue, Parnell, Auckland

 

Source:  New Zealand City and Area Directories, 1866-1954.

 

Ship ownership

 

John Henry Upton, Stationer, of Auckland is recorded as owning the Awhina from 1885-1888.  The Awhina was a 4.86 ton cutter rig, 100 x 21.2 x 10.4 ft, 1 pair of engines, 50 h.p., built at Auckland by Hector McQuarrie in 1884.

 

Source:  Watt, Morris Netterville.  Index to the New Zealand Section of the Register of All British Ships, 1840 to 1950 (inclusive).  Wellington, New Zealand Ship and Marine Society, 1963, part 1 p.51, part 2 p. 148.

 

Details of the Awhina are given in:  Marshall, Gordon de L.  Maritime Albany remembered: Les Douglas et al.  Kalamunda, W.A., Tangee, 2001.  336 p.

 

Mayoral Elections

 

MR UPTON UNANIMOUSLY ELECTED

 

There seem to be no two opinions as to who should occupy the responsible office of Mayor of the city of Auckland for the ensuing term.  The time for receiving nominations was up at noon to-day, and Mr J. H. Upton being the only candidate nominated, was declared by Mr S. Brooking, the Returning Officer, to be duly elected.  Mr Upton, as a citizen of Auckland during the past 20 years, and as one who has always taken a lively interest in all that affects the welfare of this part of the colony, takes upon him the title of "His Worship the Mayor of Auckland" with the best wishes of all.  He has been the recipient of general congratulations, and will take office under the most auspicious circumstances.  Mr Upton will assume his position on the 18th December, on which date the customary installation will take place.  Mr Upton was not a member of the City Council at the time of his election to the Mayoralty, and it must be very flattering to him to know that the members of that body have been pleased to accept him as their chairman, when the custom is to give members of the Council priority of claim to the office.  Mr Upton, however, will be no amateur hand at the helm of the City Council ship, having been one of its most active members about four years ago, when he was one of the members chosen to represent Ponsonby Ward for two successive years.  The interest he has taken in matters educational is well known, and it is pretty generally recognised that he has been foremost in the bringing about of sundry reforms in the system of management by the Board of Education.  He has been a member of the Board, and has occupied the responsible position of Chairman in that body for two years past.  Mr Upton's term of office as Chairman of the Board will expire on the 31st March next, and notwithstanding the onerous duties attached to the Mayoralty, many will be pleased to learn that he has no intention of severing his connection with the Board so long as the School Committees desire his services as a member of that body.  During Mr Upton's chairmanship, the Board of Education has undertaken and carried out successfully the very difficult task of methodical administration and the securing of a greater economy than formerly, without seriously impairing the efficiency of the system of education in the primary schools;  but instead of acting on the impulse of the moment, the endeavour of the Board, and of the Chairman especially, has been to act upon some settled principle in the administration of both finance and educational matters directly.  Mr Upton was also Chairman of the Ponsonby School Committee for some time, and is at present one of the three members of the Grammar School Board of Governors elected by the Governor, having been connected with that body for about six years.  Another responsible position which Mr Upton holds just now is trustee of the Auckland Savings Bank, and a glance at his past record as a public man will satisfy those who have reposed their trust in him to preside over the interests of the city of Auckland, that they have everything to hope for and nothing to fear from his administration of municipal affairs.

 

Source:  Auckland Evening Star Saturday 16 November 1889, p. 8.

 

Investiture of Mayor Upton

 

The retiring Mayor, Mr A. E. Devore, said that he thought the public would be well served in having secured the services of Mr Upton as Mayor.  Mr Upton was a gentleman well known throughout the whole city.  He came to them as a tried public servant with well-known business abilities, and with a well-known close and thorough application to whatever he took in hand.  Those qualities, in any sphere of life, and especially as Mayor, would be sufficient to ensure improvement and progress, and would tend undoubtedly to the great advantage of the ratepayers at large.

 

Mr J. H. Upton then signed the customary declaration.  He said that in assuming the position of Mayor of the city, he would frankly say that the uppermost feeling in his mind was a doubt as to his own ability and his own powers to adequately discharge the duties pertaining to the office in the way that they ought to be discharged.  The difficulty was increased by circumstances in which they all rejoiced – the conspicuous success of the administration of Mr Devore, for which they were all grateful to him.  (Hear, hear).  It would be impossible to perform the duties of Mayor of Auckland with greater discretion and judgment than had characterised the administration of Mr Devore.

 

Since he had consented to accept office, he had asked himself what were the duties the Mayor had to perform, and Mr Philips, the Town Clerk, who appeared to know what was in the mind of any Mayor at any particular moment, had a few minutes previously supplied him with a copy of the Municipal Corporations Act.  From this Act it appeared that the duties of the Mayor were to preside in the Council, and that as a matter of fact, there had commenced between himself and the Councillors a partnership which would probably last for a year.  He could only say that he hoped that partnership would be characterised by the same good feeling as had characterised the relations which had existed between the late Mayor and the Council.  The duties of the Mayor to a very large extent were not different from the duty of every Councillor, viz., to do all that in them and him lies to make this city a pleasant and comfortable place for those who inhabit it and for those whom we desire to come.  How to do that, of course, was a matter of detail, and was one of the duties that appertained to this office.

 

The duties of the Mayor were certainly large enough to satisfy the mind of any man.  First of all, the Council was also the Board of Health.  They also had the administration of the streets with their thousand and one difficulties, an illustration of which they had very recently when they discovered that they would have to decide a matter which had not before been decided in the whole history of municipal law.  Then there was the question of the water supply which involved a business quite as large as that of the Gas Company.  There was the Library, Art Gallery, Public Parks, and last scene of all, the cemetery at Waikomiti.  To efficiently perform these duties, to see after all these departments was a sufficiently onerous matter for the most greedy of Mayors upon entering that office.

 

Foremost amongst these multifarious duties was the question of the public health.  They lived here in a most beautiful climate, surrounded by every advantage that nature could give them, where, if a man had only a healthy mind in a healthy body, it should be happiness to get, and it would be their own fault if they did not conserve the health of this city by every means in their power.  No man could be happy who lived in an unhealthy place, and all sorts of evils arose from want of care in sanitary matters.  They should be especially careful in insisting upon giving effect to their own by-laws.

 

The next subject of importance was the Library, and he desired to congratulate Mr Devore in this matter for having brought about the appointment of a committee to select suitable books, making the Library not only a source of public instruction, but an attraction to people to settle in this place.  Next to the establishment of the Library this appointment of an advisory committee was the most important step that had been taken, and its usefulness had also been greatly enhanced by the addition of a lending department.

 

Another important thing was the management of their Art Gallery, and in this they owed a great deal to their fellow-citizens.  For ten years Dr. Campbell had cultivated the young plant, at his own expense, maintaining a school of instruction in drawing, but this had now ceased, owing to the liberality of Dr. Elam, who had established a school of art for the very purposes for which Dr. Campbell had provided accommodation for ten years previously.  In addition to this they had the handsome donations of Mr Mackelvie to cultivate and educate the people, who would not be happy if removed from centres of the cultivation of art, which was one of the things most attractive to the mind of man.  They could encourage art by occasionally purchasing a picture from those most successful amongst their own amateurs, and this was one of the things he would like to see done.  In this way Auckland might be regarded not only as the most beautiful and most healthy, but also the most cultured of places, even becoming the centre of art in the Southern as was Greece in the Northern Hemisphere.

 

There was another and more prosaic duty to perform in the administration of the large revenues of this city.  If there was one thing more than another conducive to good government it was the observance of a necessary though sometimes unpleasant principle of strict economy.  Nothing could be more uncomfortable for people in any place than that they should be overtaxed.  They were overtaxed in this colony, and there was a great danger that they might be overtaxed in this city also.  Ordinarily, there was nothing more attractive to the individual than to feel during the years when in the enjoyment of the full possession of his powers that he was laying aside some provision for the time of weakness and old age.  The possession of property was to many people a great advantage, but it had, unfortunately, came about – although he believed the depression was only temporary, and that the dawn of better times was at hand – it had come about that the possession of property had absolutely proved to be disadvantageous, and it would be their duty to so administer the public revenue of this city that this pressure should not be felt more heavily than need be.  They had, of course, a large amount of interest on borrowed money that must be paid, some half a million in addition to the floating debt of £20,000.  In the meantime, they could make no reduction of the great funded debt, but they could in the future make an alteration in the floating debt as had already been done during the administration of Mr Devore.  No doubt, in matters of public health it was necessary to expend money even when they did not desire to do so, but it was not at a time when they were extremely poor that they should go into great works even for the sake of the public health.  If they had managed to live and be healthy up to the present time a few more years would not hurt them.  He would therefore strenuously oppose any attempt to launch out into new works, excepting works of the greatest necessity, that would tend to increase this floating debt of the city.  He saw no reason why this floating debt should not be wiped off.  There was a feeling in this colony that it was not discreditable to be in debt, but he held that in public matters, as well as in private affairs, the borrower was the slave to the lender.  He had never seen any good whatever come of it, and he would be very glad if it were possible for them to wipe off at least a portion, and in time the whole, of the floating debt.

 

Mr Upton also spoke of the desirability of refraining from the utilisation of profit obtained from the water supply for other works, thereby giving the ratepayers the benefit of a reduced water rate, and concluded by inviting those present to a pleasant ceremony that was to take place in the Art Gallery, and also to drink his health in the Mayor’s room.

 

Source:  Auckland Evening Star Wednesday 18 December 1889, p. 8.

 

The Mayoral Election

 

Yielding to a generally-expressed desire that he should accept a second term, Mr Upton announces in another column that he will be a candidate for re-election as Mayor of the city.  The nomination takes place on Saturday next, but there is no likelihood of opposition.  During his occupancy of the office, Mr Upton has been more than ordinarily successful in winning golden opinions from all classes of citizens.  In the Council he has striven uniformly to secure economical administration, and has succeeded in improving the condition of the municipal account.  It was not Mr Upton’s good fortune to hold office when borrowed thousands enabled the Council to carry out works in every direction and meet the demands of residents in ill-formed streets with pleasant assurances of speedy amendment.  His task has been the more disagreeable one of resisting applications which would have received favourable consideration if the bank overdraft had been less formidable.  The past year has shown that the streets can be kept in good repair and the city services maintained in a state of efficiency out of the general city revenues.  The municipality, like the colony, requires a period of rest, to give the recuperative processes free play, and without any ostentatious obtrusion of the iron hand, His Worship has quietly exercised a repressive influence over any manifested tendencies towards extravagance.  In connection with the Free Public Library, Art Gallery, and Albert Park his personal efforts have contributed materially towards the improvement of those popular institutions.

 

In discharging those more or less ornamental functions which appertain to the Mayoral office – the reception and entertainment of visitors, and presiding over public gatherings – Mr Upton has acquitted himself with credit.  A graceful and effective speaker, his platform utterances always command respectful attention.  During the past year a more than average share of this kind of work has fallen to the lot of the Mayor.  Altogether, Mr Upton has well-earned the distinction of a second term, and we believe that the announcement of his willingness to fulfil the duties for another year will be received with general satisfaction by the citizens.

 

                        Source:  Auckland Evening Star Thursday 13 November 1890, p. 4.

 

Mr Upton returned unopposed

 

Nominations for the office of Mayor of the City of Auckland were due at noon to-day, when John Henry Upton was proposed by William Crowther and James M. Lennox.  There being no other nomination the Returning Officer declared Mr Upton to have been duly elected.  Mr Upton’s second term will commence on the 17th December next.

 

                        Source:  Auckland Evening Star Monday 17 November 1890, p. 3.

 

“Turn again, Upton, Mayor of Auckland –

John Henry Upton, of bookselling fame;

Perhaps, before long, for the City of Auckland

You’ll sit, with the tail, ‘M.H.R.’ to your name !”

 

[M.H.R. = Member of the House of Representatives]

 

Source:  The New Zealand Observer and Free Lance: an Illustrated Journal of Interesting and Amusing Literature Saturday 27 December 1890, p. 9 col.B.

 

Uptonian Sunday

 

Some time ago, in the Diocesan Synod, in an unguarded moment, Mr Upton gave a description of what has since been known historically as “the Uptonian Sunday” –namely, “have a good dinner, stretch oneself on a sofa with a book, and fall asleep”.  The Rev. C. H. Garland wrestled with “the Uptonian Sunday”, and tore it to tatters – the result being some epistolary correspondence between Mr Upton and the rev. gentleman, which eventuated in a treaty of peace.  Mr Upton has since been supersensitive on the subject of the Uptonian Sunday ...


Source: Otago Daily Times Monday 10 August 1891, p. 4.

 

What Mr Upton actually said was reported as:  “What seemed to him the most appropriate way of spending the Sunday was to go to church, then have dinner, then smoke your pipe, lie flat on your back on the sofa, and go to sleep”.  (Laughter).

                       

Source:  New Zealand Herald 17 November 1888, p. 3.

 

Mr Upton gave a lengthy response to critics of his jocular remarks in a letter to the editor, New Zealand Herald 26 November 1888, p. 3.

 

Presentation of Mayoral Chain of Office

 

The Mayor of Auckland, Mr. J. H. Upton, has signalised his term of office by making a most appropriate present to the City Council.  It consists of a large and massive gold Maltese cross, which is intended to form the central pendant of a Mayoral chain to be worn by the gentlemen who will have the honour of being his successors.  The idea is that each Mayor should add a link to the chain, with his name, year of office, and a motto indicating his estimation of the duties of the position engraved thereon, so that the chain may be a record, annually increasing in interest, of the names and sentiments of our chief citizens.  Mr. Upton made his presentation to the Council last night. ...

 

The emblem consisted of the arms of the city set in a Maltese cross, with two mottoes engraved upon it:  “Be just and fear not”, and “Do well your part;  there all the honour lies”. ...

 

Mr. Upton expressed the hope that the Council would accept his offering as a token of how highly he appreciated the honour of having been for two years Mayor of the city of Auckland. ...

 

The Town Clerk then placed the broad black silk ribbon upon which the emblem is suspended round the Mayor’s neck, a ceremony that was accompanied by enthusiastic applause.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 13 November 1891, p. 4, 6.

 

A gift of the arms of Auckland in gold enamel, to be appended to the Maltese cross in the mayoral chain, has been made to the City Council by Mr. J. H. Upton, who donated the first portion of the chain during his term of office as mayor.  The council passed a resolution heartily thanking Mr. Upton.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 8 February 1924, p. 8.

  

Retirement from Mayoralty

 

It would be ungracious to allow Mr Upton to retire from office without testifying to the very able manner in which he has discharged the exceedingly onerous duties devolving upon him as the executive head of our city.  We do not hesitate to say that none of his predecessors has filled the office more worthily or has earned a larger share of public respect and esteem.

 

Source: Auckland Star Wednesday 16 December 1891, p. 4.

 

Mr. Upton has been most careful and painstaking in his administration, and he is deserving of the gratitude of the citizens.  Taking office at a somewhat critical time, he has all through kept a tight hold on the finances, so that at the present time Auckland can look at the future without trepidation.  Mr. Upton has been constant and attentive in his discharge of business at the Council offices, and he has given every satisfaction in his management on ceremonial occasions when high dignitaries have visited the city.  He has been enabled during his term of office greatly to increase that noble institution the Free Library, the Committee for the selection and purchase of books (over which he has presided) having been greatly aided by his business habits, and his special knowledge in that department.  He has also succeeded in carrying through a very satisfactory arrangement in regard to the Mackelvie collection, which will be placed in a building adjacent to the present Art Gallery, and will, in the course of time, become a grand attraction of the city.  At the gathering of the Friendly Societies last Sunday, Sir George Grey said that he hoped to see Mr. Upton representing the citizens of Auckland in another capacity.  We may say that we should very gladly see a person of his practical shrewdness and common sense representing the city of Auckland in the House of Representatives.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 17 November 1891, p. 4.

 

Life and career

 

Mr. John Henry Upton, who filled the Mayoral Chair of Auckland with credit to himself and profit to the city for the years 1889-90 and 1890-91, holds a record in the public service well entitling him to the high esteem in which he is held.

 

Mr. Upton was born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1845, and is the second son of the late Mr. Henry Upton, a surveyor and farmer of that county.  Educated at the private academy of the Rev. Percy Strutt, M.A., at Spalding, Mr. Upton, on attaining his majority, sailed for Auckland in the ship Chili.  On arrival, he entered into partnership with his late brother in the still well-remembered firm of Messrs. W. B. and J. H. Upton – the flourishing concern which is now so well known as “Upton and Co”.

 

To enumerate all the public offices held by Mr. Upton during his active life at the Northern Capital would occupy more space than it is convenient to allow, and a few must suffice.  Whatever he has undertaken has been faithfully carried to a successful issue, this being the natural result of his unvarying rule to thoroughly qualify himself for any office he might be called upon to fill.  As an instance of this it may be mentioned that, before accepting the onerous position of chairman of the Education Board, he made himself well acquainted with the duties of the office by assiduous attention as a member of the Board throughout a period of four years.  This, with his two years’ chairmanship, made a total membership of six years, following upon some experience as a school committeeman, and as a member of the Board of Governors of the Auckland College and Grammar School.

 

In like manner, Mr. Upton served some four years as a borough councillor before entering upon the more responsible position of mayor.  During his occupancy of the chief civic office, Mr. Upton was fortunate in securing for the city a great boon by an arrangement with the trustees of the Mackelvie Trust, under the authority of the Supreme Court, to “house” the famous Mackelvie Art Collection in the same building as the city collection.  Later on, when a vacancy occurred through the death of one of the Mackelvie Trustees, Mr. Upton was elected to the Board.  Another very important office which Mr. Upton holds is that of chairman of the Auckland City Sinking Fund Commissioners – a post of honour and usefulness occupied by him since the inception of the Board, now (1897) more than ten years ago.

 

The South British Insurance Board and that of the Auckland Gas Company claim Mr. Upton as an active member, the chairmanship of the South British Company having been in his hands for the year 1895, and that of the Auckland Gas Company for 1897.  After many years of trusteeship of the Auckland Savings Bank, Mr. Upton became, and was at the time of writing (July, 1897) vice-president of that institution.  For twenty years he has been a member of the Auckland Institute, and was president of that influential society for the year 1894-5.

 

As a churchman, Mr. Upton has been prominent for a quarter of a century.  He either is or has been connected with almost every Anglican Church function, including the Diocesan Synod for many years, and the General Synod when held at Christchurch, Auckland, and Dunedin.  He is a member of the General Trust, the Melanesian Mission Trust, and many other boards.

 

Though a better worker than player, Mr. Upton has not been slow to help forward the harmless varieties of legitimate recreation, and many a struggling society has been encouraged and aided by his friendly advice and generosity.

 

In 1870 Mr. Upton was married to Miss Gorrie, daughter of the late Mr. William Gorrie, and sister of Mr. Upton’s present partner.  They have seven children – five sons and two daughters.

 

Source:  The cyclopedia of New Zealand:  industrial, descriptive, historical, biographical facts, figures, illustrations.  Vol. 2, Auckland provincial district.  Wellington, Cyclopedia Co., 1902, p. 126-7.

 

            Accident

 

TRAP ACCIDENT IN ALBERT-STREET: A WONDERFUL ESCAPE

 

A trap accident, which very nearly escaped being attended with serious results, occurred in Albert-street yesterday afternoon.  Mr. J. H. Upton had been met by his groom with a horse and trap in Wyndham-street, where a parcel had to be picked up.  Mr. Upton had got into the trap and taken his seat, and the groom went to adjust the horse's headgear.  By some means the bridle came off, and the horse becoming startled bolted full gallop up the street and into Albert-street, where it dashed into a dray.  Mr. Upton, who, of course, was powerless to steer or control the unbridled horse, very fortunately succeeded in jumping out of the trap as the collision occurred, and he received nothing worse than a slight shaking.  His escape from injury was really a wonderful one.  The trap was smashed to pieces, and the dray also sustained some slight damage.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 11 August 1904, p. 4.

 

Upton and Company, Booksellers & Stationers

 

See also Millett, Tony.  Bibliography of works published by Upton and Company, Auckland, with a brief history of the Company 1864-1916.  Takapuna, Auckland, Tony Millett, 2013.  18 p.  http://tonymillett.tripod.com/uptonhist.html.

 

Upton & Company, formerly Upton Brothers and W.B. & J.H. Upton, located at 158-160 Queen Street, Auckland, was sold to George Hawkes Whitcombe of Whitcombe & Tombs Ltd in June 1916.

 

Sources: Index Auckland, record 78040;  Rogers, Anna and Rogers, Max.  Turning the pages: the story of bookselling in New Zealand.  Auckland, Reed, 1993.

 

Big Book-Selling Business Changes Hands.  Purchased by Whitcombe and Tombs.

 

One of the oldest businesses of Auckland city changed hands yesterday, when the bookselling and stationery establishment of Messrs Upton and Co., of Queen Street, was taken over by the equally well known southern house of publishers and booksellers, Messrs Whitcombe and Tombs.

 

It is the intention of the new proprietors almost immediately to commence the erection of fine new premises at the corner of Queen and Durham Streets, to which the present business will be transferred as soon as they are completed.  Meantime the business will be continued as usual, excepting that the purchasers take over immediate control.  The management of the business will be under the personal supervision of Mr. B. E. H. Whitcombe, the general manager of the company, who is at present in London, but is expected to return about October.

The passing of Messrs Upton and Company’s business will be of considerable sentimental interest to old residents, for, established more than fifty years ago by Mr W. B. Upton, who was joined in 1866 by his brother, Mr J. H. Upton, and who died in 1870, its name is now familiar to three generations of Aucklanders.  The repute of the old firm is not confined to Auckland, but extends throughout the Dominion, for the wholesale department of the firm has been an important branch of its activities.  The retail trade of the firm was very extensive, and one of its specialties which has brought its name into considerable prominence has been the sale of educational works and the encouragement of the demand for high-class literature.  Mr J. H. Upton retired from the firm about seven years ago.  Since then it has been conducted by his sons, Messrs P. T. and S. Upton.  Mr J. H. Upton has been closely identified with many of the leading commercial activities of the province.  He is the acting-chairman of directors of the Bank of New Zealand, and as a director of other leading mercantile companies has occupied the position of chairman of the Auckland Gas Company, the South British Insurance Company, the Northern Steamship Company, the Northern Roller Mills, and is on the directorate of several other concerns.  Amongst Anglican churchmen Mr Upton’s is a prominent name;  for, as a member of the Diocesan Trust Board and other lay organisations of the Church, he has rendered long and useful service.

 

Source:  Auckland Star 16 June 1916, p. 6.

 

Auckland Business Sold.  Messrs. Upton and Company.

 

The bookselling and stationery business of Messrs. Upton and Co., of Queen Street, has been disposed of to Messrs Whitcombe and Tombs, publishers and booksellers, who have branches at present at Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin.  The building operations which have been decided upon by the purchasers will involve an expenditure of £18,250.

 

The business of Messrs. Upton and Company was established more than 50 years ago.  The founder of the firm was Mr. W. B. Upton, who died in 1870.  Four years before his death he was joined by his brother, Mr. J. H. Upton, who carried on the business until he retired about seven years ago, leaving the management of the firm’s affairs to be conducted by his sons.

 

Mr. J. H. Upton became associated with many leading commercial enterprises.  He is acting-chairman of the directors of the Bank of New Zealand during the absence from the Dominion of the chairman, Mr. Harold Beauchamp.  He is chairman of directors of the Auckland Gas Company, and has occupied a similar position on the directorate of the South British Insurance Company, the Northern Roller Mills and the Northern Steamship Company, of which and other concerns he is at present a director.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 17 June 1916, p. 5.

 

Service to Anglican Synod

 

Reference was made in the address of Bishop Averill at the opening of the Anglican Synod to Mr. J. H. Upton’s absence from his accustomed place.  The Bishop said Mr. Upton had not sought re-election to the present Synod.  That gentleman had been a member of the Diocesan Synod since 1873, and filled the important office of chairman of committees from 1893 to 1916.  For many years he represented the diocese on the General Synod, and had been a member of the Melanesian Trust Board since 1873, and of the Diocesan Trust Board since 1884, and still retains his seat on both Boards.  From 1892 till 1912 he was also a member of the St. John’s College Trust Board.  “Such a record of service”, said Bishop Averill, in his address to the synod yesterday, “speaks for itself and needs no comment, save the remark that few men in their day and generation can show a similar record and no man can take his place”.

 

Source:  Auckland Star Friday 19 October 1917, p. 4;  New Zealand Herald 20 October 1917, p. 8.

 

Cordial reference to the services rendered by Mr. J. H. Upton as a member of the Anglican Synod was made at the meeting of that body last evening.  The following resolution was carried, on the motion of Archdeacon G. MacMurray:  “That the synod, on the retirement of Mr. Upton as a member, desires to place on record its high appreciation of his services to the Church, as a member of the Diocesan Synod for 44 years, as chairman of committees for 13 years, and as a member of the General Synod for many years, and especially for his valuable services on the General Trust Board and other trusts;  Mr. Upton freely gave of his time and business knowledge to the work of the Church, and the synod, while thanking him for his past services, hopes that he will continue to help the Church on the Trust Board and the Melanesian Trust Board for many years to come”.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 23 October 1917, p. 4.

           

Service with South British Insurance Company Ltd

 

Director:  1890-1929

 

Chairman:  1891-1892, 1894-1895, 1897-1898, 1900-1901, 1903-1904, 1907-1908, 1911-1912, 1917-1918

 

Source:  Vennell, C. W.  Risks and rewards: a policy of enterprise 1872-1972: a centennial history of the South British Insurance Company Limited.  Auckland, Wilson and Horton, 1972, p. 344-345.

 

            Biography

 

Upton, John Henry (1863-1929), second son of Henry Upton, surveyor and farmer, was born in Lincolnshire, and educated at the Rev. Percy Strutt’s academy in Spalding.  Arriving in Auckland in 1866 by the Chili, he joined his brother as booksellers and stationers in the business later known as Upton and Co.  He was a member of the education board (1884-89) and chairman for a year, a member of the City Council in 1884, mayor of Auckland (1889-91) and chairman of the Auckland sinking fund commissioners from 1884.  He was also a director of the South British Insurance Co. (1895-1929), of the Auckland Gas Co. (1897-1920), the Northern Steam Ship Co., the Hikurangi Coal Co., New Zealand newspapers and for some years of the Bank of New Zealand.  He took part in founding the Riverhead paper mills, and was a trustee of the Auckland Savings Bank (1883-1929), of the Melanesian mission trust from 1874, and of St. John’s College.  For many years he was a member of the Auckland Museum and Institute, and in 1902 he was president of the Auckland Chamber of Commerce.  Upton married in 1870 a daughter of William Gorrie.  He died on 28 May 1929.

 

Source:  Scholefield, G. H.  A dictionary of New Zealand biography.  Wellington, Dept of Internal Affairs, 1940, v. 2 p. 413.

 

Obituaries

 

The people of Auckland will learn with sincere regret of the death of Mr. J. H. Upton, long one of our best-known and most prominent citizens.  For over half a century he has been closely associated with the public and commercial life of this city.  Forty years ago he was chairman of the Education Board;  he was Mayor of Auckland in 1891-2;  and he took a leading part in the direction and development of some of our most important financial and commercial concerns – the Auckland Savings Bank, the Auckland Gas Company, and the South British Insurance Company.  Mr. Upton was a devout churchman, and his interest in the Melanesian Mission, in St. John’s College, and in the administration of Anglican Church affairs involved the expenditure of a large amount of time and energy.  A man endowed with a strong sense of personal and public responsibility, vigorous, clear-sighted and enterprising, Mr. Upton proved himself always worthy of the confidence reposed in him by his fellow-citizens.  Auckland owes much to the conscientious industry and the vigorous personality of some of our older citizens, and to the high standard of personal and commercial integrity that they set up;  and the name of John Henry Upton is well worthy of inclusion in the list of those founders of our civic life whose memory we should delight to honour.

 

Source:  Auckland Star Tuesday 28 May 1929, p. 6.

 

Mr. John Henry Upton, aged 84, is dead.  He was a former chairman of the Bank of New Zealand and one of its directors.  He was also connected with many leading Auckland business organisations.

 

Though in the main an Auckland man, Mr. Upton had a Dominion standing from the fact that for several years he was a director of the Bank of New Zealand, after it came under partial Government control subsequent to the great financial crisis of the early ’90s, and at one period, during the absence from the Dominion of Sir Harold Beauchamp, then chairman of the bank directors, he held the office of acting-chairman.  Mr. Upton was a native of Lancashire, where he was born in 1845.  He came out to Auckland as a young man, and carried on the business of a stationer in Auckland for a very long period, eventually selling out the concern to Whitcombe and Tombs, Ltd.  For many years he was a member of the Auckland City Council, and he was Mayor of the city for two years.  He was largely instrumental in arranging with the trustees of the late Mr. J. T. Mackelvie for the housing of the valuable Mackelvie collection of art treasures in the Auckland Art Gallery, of which it forms a very important part.  For six years he was a member of the Auckland Education Board, and for two years its chairman.  Since 1883 he has been one of the trustees of the Auckland Savings Bank, to which he has also held the office of vice-president.  Of the Auckland Institute he has long been a prominent member, and for two years he was president.  He was for long a director of the South British Insurance Company and the Auckland Gas Company, and has been chairman of both bodies.  In the Anglican Church he was an office-bearer for half a century, was a member of the Auckland Diocesan Synod and the General Synod of New Zealand, a member of the Melanesian Mission Trust, and other boards of the church, and for 25 years he was chairman of the committee to the Auckland Synod.

 

Source:  Evening Post 28 May 1929, p. 10 col. E.

 

A prominent citizen – long and useful life

 

It is with regret that we have to record the death of Mr. J. H. Upton, which occurred at his residence in St. Stephen’s Avenue this morning.  He was in his 84th year.  As a rule men who have lived as long are known to the current generation merely on account of their great age, and some vague sort of former reputation for activity.  But he never seemed old, and it must come as a surprise to even many of his friends to realise that he actually was nearly eighty-four.  Always a man of tireless energy, there seemed but little slackening as the years passed, and it was only very recently that there were any indications that he exceeded by over a decade the allotted span of life.

 

Probably few men have given so much of their time for the public good.  Look for any movement that has helped to mould Auckland’s history during the past sixty years and you are almost certain to find the name of J. H. Upton somewhere in the forefront.  And the remarkable thing about his whole life was that whatever he did he did well;  success always seemed to follow his name.  It was not a mere matter of luck;  the secret was that he never took charge of anything until he was thorough master of all the details.

 

And he was remarkably versatile.  He was equally at home whether presiding over a meeting of hard-headed shareholders, over a meeting of scientific people and amateurs at the New Zealand Institute, over a gathering of people interested in art, or acting as chairman of committee at the Synod.  His wide knowledge of life, of human nature, and his inherent keenness and interest in current events gave him a unique position in Auckland.  Many different men have filled similar positions, but one can think of no other one man who has filled so many and such varied positions.

 

Born in Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire, in 1845, his father being a well-known surveyor and farmer of that county, Mr. Upton came to Auckland by the ship Chili sixty-three years ago, when he was 21 years of age.  He joined a brother in a business which later became a household word in Auckland, Upton and Co., the well-known booksellers, a firm which had a place in Queen Street for many years, and later was absorbed by Messrs. Whitcombe and Tombs.

 

He has held so many offices in public and social life during the past 63 years that a simple enumeration of them seems like a page out of a directory.  Taking civic affairs first, we find that he was four years a councillor before taking the office of Mayor – always true to his rule to first serve an apprenticeship.  His election to the Mayoral chair was inevitable, and he served two terms, 1889-90 and 1890-91.  It was during his term of office that he brought about the arrangement with the Mackelvie trustees which permitted the housing of the Mackelvie collection in the same building as the city art collections.  Under the will the Mackelvie collection was supposed to be placed in a separate building, but the difficulty was got over by erecting it alongside the city Art Gallery.  Always keenly interested in art, he afterwards became a Mackelvie trustee, and took the keenest interest in his duties.  His services to the Auckland Society of Arts should also be mentioned.

 

In education matters we again see his rule applied, for he served several years as committeeman, member of the Education Board and member of the board of governors of the Grammar School, so that he was well-fitted for the office of chairman, which he filled in 1888-89 with great success.

 

The Auckland Institute was one of Mr. Upton’s hobbies.  He was a regular attendant at the meetings, and could always be relied upon to contribute something useful to the discussions that used to follow the delivery of papers on scientific subjects.  A very well-read man, he had more than the usual layman’s knowledge of matters that were dealt with at these meetings.  Naturally he filled the presidential chair.

 

Until some years ago he was one of the most prominent members of the Auckland Diocesan Synod, and his business ability had full scope on the General Trust Board, of which he was a member for a long period.  The Melanesian Mission Trust and St. John’s College Trust were two other boards which have to thank him for much.  He was also a member of the General Synod over a period of years.

 

Mr. Upton had a wide range of business interests.  After he retired from his own business he still continued take keen interest in the many concerns with which he was connected.  His sound judgment and knowledge of affairs led to him becoming chairman of the City Sinking Fund Commissioners away back in 1886.  Two years before that date, however, he was president of the Auckland Savings Bank.  That seems a long while ago, but in 1924 we find him just retiring from the position of chairman of directors of the Bank of New Zealand – the most important financial position in the Dominion.  Such a record illustrates in a striking manner the long period of activity covered by his life.

 

If he had a partiality for one of his many city interests it would probably be the South British Insurance Company, of which for many years he had been a director and also chairman.  He had been connected with it for half a century and saw it grow from a very modest local affair to the very solid concern it is to-day, with world-wide connections.  And his judgment and experience went a long way towards putting the company in its present proud position.  Another concern with which his name will always be remembered in the city is the Auckland Gas Company, of which he was director for years.  He assisted to form the Riverhead Paper Mills (now the New Zealand Paper Mills), was a director of the Northern Steamship Company, the Hikurangi Coal Company, New Zealand Newspapers Ltd., and even that long list does not exhaust his activities.

 

Although he had been suffering with his heart for the past few years, he kept up an interest in a surprising number of things, and died as he would have wished, in harness.

 

The family, who will have wide sympathy, are Mrs. Upton, three surviving sons and two daughters – Mr. W. B. Upton, Mr. Percy H. Upton, general manager of the South British Insurance Company, Mr. Parker T. Upton, of Messrs. Richards and Upton, Mrs. J. M. Stevenson and Miss E. M. Upton, all of Auckland.  There are nineteen grandchildren.

 

After a service in St. Mary’s Cathedral, Parnell, the funeral cortege will leave for Waikumete Cemetery at 3 p.m.

 

                        Source:  Auckland Star Tuesday 28 May 1929, p. 8.

 

Mr. J. H. Upton

 

The life of this city has so long and so intimately had interwoven with it the personality of Mr. J. H. Upton that it is wellnigh impossible to think of it without him.  Yesterday he died.  Many to-morrows will become yesterdays ere that very regrettable event is fully realised, and many more ere his name ceases to be a household word.  The records of Auckland for more than half a century have that name indelibly written in them, and round it gather through the years story upon story of civic and commercial and social achievement.  By the capable and devoted enterprise of such as he, the city that is came to its manifold prosperity, and the city that will be can never have its broadening activity explained without grateful reference to the many-sided service of which his career was so signal an instance.  It was more than an instance:  it was in the full sense an example.  It is the genius and guerdon of such lives that they inspire others and will continue to inspire.  Whenever J. H. Upton is recalled there will persist a wonder that he touched the city’s life at so many points and always helpfully.  Never was exemplified more notably the truth that “one man in his time plays many parts”, and he always played them well, in no mere histrionic way, but with a vigour and sincerity quite native to him.  He was marked out by versatile aptitudes for varied responsibilities.  The places he filled were amazingly numerous – yet not amazingly, for he brought to them natural gifts suiting them all.  In commercial finance he won remarkable trust and distinction;  in municipal business he was eminently honoured and successful;  in work for educational advance, through active participation in this and that society for the promotion of science and of art, he was ever usefully busy.  Often he was given leadership as a natural and inevitable right;  always he lent a hand, willing and able, to what was clearly seen by him to be for the good of his fellows.  That as a churchman he should have been entrusted frequently with high duty was in the fitness of things, for in character and in quiet religious ardour he was a veritable “serving brother”.  Thus through the years that did little to age him he shed his genial and pervasive influence, and this remains and will long be felt.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 29 May 1929, p. 12.

 

Mr. J. H. Upton’s Death

Former Mayor of Auckland

Notable career of service.  Wide and varied interests.

 

The death of Mr. J. H. Upton, one of Auckland’s best-known citizens, and a former Mayor of the city, occurred yesterday at his residence, in St. Stephen’s Avenue, Parnell.  Mr. Upton, who was within two days of his 84th birthday, was for over half a century prominent in the commercial and public affairs of the city, and many of the associations he had held through long years he retained until his death.

Born in Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire, on May 30, 1845, Mr. Upton was the second son of the late Mr. Henry Upton, surveyor and farmer.  He was educated at the private academy of the Rev. Percy Strutt, M.A., at Spalding, and, at the age of 21, sailed for Auckland in the ship Chili, mainly to recruit his health, which was never robust.  Soon after arrival in Auckland Mr. Upton entered into partnership with his elder brother, the late Mr. W. B. Upton, who had preceded him to New Zealand, in a bookselling and stationery business.  The firm was later known as Upton and Company, under which title the business was continued until 1916, when it was purchased by Messrs. Whitcombe and Tombs.

 

Achievements as Mayor.

 

During a residence of over 60 years in Auckland, Mr. Upton identified himself prominently with almost every phase of public activity.  Serving an apprenticeship of four years on the Auckland City Council, he was in November, 1889, elected unopposed as Mayor of the city, on the retirement of the late Mr. A. E. T. Devore.  Mr. Upton was again elected unopposed in the following year, retiring from the position in 1891.  During his term the jubilee of Auckland and New Zealand was celebrated, and Mr. Upton was a central figure in the memorable function at the Domain which marked the occasion in January, 1890.

 

A conspicuous service performed by Mr. Upton as Mayor was the arranging with the Mackelvie trustees for the housing of the Mackelvie art collection in the same building as the city art collection.  Later, when death caused a vacancy on the board of trustees, Mr. Upton was appointed a trustee, and he was chairman at the time of his death.  Mr. Upton was also closely associated with the Auckland Institute and the Auckland Society of Arts.  For six years also he was a member of the Auckland Education Board, being chairman for the last two years of the term.  He also served the cause of education as a member of the Grammar School Board of Governors, of which he was for one term chairman.

 

As a member and office-bearer of the Church of England, Mr. Upton also gave a conspicuous service.  He had been connected with almost every important church function in Auckland, and, besides being a member of the Diocesan Synod for many years, he also sat in General Synod for several terms.  As a member of the Melanesian Mission Trust, the St. John’s College Trust, and the General Trust Board he also did fine work.  For 23 years Mr. Upton was chairman of committees of the Auckland Synod, a position from which he voluntarily retired in 1916.

 

In the Realm of Commerce.

 

His business interests covered an amazingly wide range.  “I gave up work to carry bricks”, he was wont to remark, and certainly his retirement from his own business left him scant leisure, so numerous and diversified were his remaining activities.  Perhaps in the commercial realm his long record as a director of the South British Insurance Company stands out most conspicuously.  Joining the directorate in 1890 he served continuously until his death, being chairman of directors on several occasions.  As a director of the Auckland Gas Company continuously from February, 1892, and chairman for 23 years of that period, Mr. Upton retained to the end another early business association.  It was only last August that through the weight of advancing years he felt constrained to vacate the chairmanship.

 

Yet, great as were the terms of his service in connection with the South British Insurance Company and the Auckland Gas Company, both were eclipsed by his period as trustee of the Auckland Savings Bank.  He was elected a trustee in 1883, and still held office at his death.  He was vice-president of the institution in 1895, a position equivalent to the present office of president, which was formerly held by the Governor of New Zealand.  Mr. Upton was the only trustee of the present board who was in office at the time of the well-remembered one-day “rush” on the bank in 1893, when depositors besieged the bank to withdraw their money, but, being later convinced that rumour once more was a lying jade, kept the bank staff feverishly engaged until 11 o’clock that night re-accepting deposits.

 

Tribute of Half-Masted Flags.

 

Capping his fine record as a financier Mr. Upton served on the directorate of the Bank of New Zealand, and was for a term acting-chairman during the absence of Sir Harold Beauchamp.  Mr. Upton retired from the board in June, 1924.  Mr. Upton was chairman of the Auckland Sinking Fund Commissioners for several years, and was in 1902 president of the Auckland Chamber of Commerce.  At the time of his death he was on the directorates of the Northern Steamship Company, the Northern Roller Mills and New Zealand Newspapers, Ltd.  Mr. Upton was a member of the Auckland and Northern Clubs.

 

Mr. Upton married Miss Eleanor Gorrie, a daughter of the Rev. John Gorrie, on June 9, 1871.  He is survived by Mrs. Upton, three sons and two daughters.  They are Mr. W. B. Upton, Mr. Percy H. Upton, general manager of the South British Insurance Company, Mr. Parker T. Upton, Mrs. J. M. Stevenson and Miss E. M. Upton, all of Auckland.  A service will be conducted in St. Mary’s Cathedral by the Rev. P. T. Williams at three o’clock this afternoon, after which the cortege will leave for the crematorium at the Waikumete Cemetery.

 

Half-masted flags in the city yesterday indicated the wide esteem in which Mr. Upton was held.  A resolution of sympathy with Mr. Upton’s relatives was passed at a meeting of the Auckland Harbour Board yesterday.

 

“Mr. Upton’s death is a big loss to the city”, said the Mayor, Mr. G. Baildon, at a special meeting of the Auckland City Council last evening.  Brief reference was made to Mr. Upton’s services as Mayor and as one of the city’s sinking fund commissioners, and a resolution of condolence with the relatives was carried.

 

Members of the Auckland Institute paid a tribute to the memory of Mr. Upton at a meeting last evening.  On the motion of Professor A. P. W. Thomas it was resolved:  “That this meeting of members of the Auckland Institute places on record its warmest appreciation of the great public services rendered by the late Mr. J. H. Upton, and especially of his lifelong interest in the Auckland Institute and Museum, first as one of its earliest members and afterwards as past president and chairman of the Museum Trust Board”.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 29 May 1929, p. 14.

 

Parting tribute

 

The high esteem in which the late Mr. J. H. Upton was held by citizens of Auckland was given full expression yesterday afternoon, both at the service in St. Mary’s Cathedral and at the funeral at Waikumete Cemetery.  Upwards of 400 friends and associates in business attended at the cathedral, where a brief service was conducted by Canon P. T. Williams.  More than 200 beautiful floral tributes were carried in four special motor cars and the cortege comprised over 50 cars. ...

 

Reference to the loss sustained by the Auckland Institute and Museum by the death of Mr. Upton was made at the annual meeting last evening.  The president (Mr. H. E. Vaile) said that Mr. Upton had been a continuous member of the institute for about 60 years and that he was president on several occasions and chairman of the Trust Board.  Members paid the customary mark of respect.

 

At the opening of the annual exhibition of the Auckland Society of Arts last evening the president (Dr. E. B. Gunson) made feeling reference to the death of Mr. Upton, who, at the time of his death, was a vice-president of the society.  Dr. Gunson said that Mr. Upton had served the cause of art for a great number of years and had rendered especially notable service as chairman of the Mackelvie Trust.  His death was a great loss to the community.

 

                        Source:  Auckland Star Thursday 30 May 1929, p. 11.

  

Will

 

The will of the late Mr. J. H. Upton has been filed at the Supreme Court, the value of the estate for the purposes of probate being sworn at under £130,000.

 

                        Source:  Auckland Star Monday 10 June 1929, p. 3.

 

            An insurance pioneer

 

At to-day’s meeting of shareholders in the South British Insurance Co. the chairman of directors said that before proceeding with the business of the meeting it was with profound regret that he recorded the death of the late Mr. J. H. Upton, who had been a member of the board for nearly forty years.  Mr. Upton was appointed a director at a time when the company was undergoing an experience that not infrequently befalls young insurance companies, an experience that many are unable to survive.  In their case, as older shareholders remembered, reconstruction involving a writing down of capital was necessary.  It was fitting that this phase of their history should be brought to light upon this occasion, for Mr. Upton was the last surviving member of the board who guided the company through those troublous times, and by their policy of conserving the underwriting surplus laid the foundation of its ultimate success.

“No one had the interests of this company more at heart than Mr. Upton”, said the speaker.   “His knowledge and insight into its affairs, his business acumen and probity, his lifelong devotion to building up its resources, won for him a unique place in our counsels.  Auckland is the poorer by his death and we, in common with many Auckland institutions, mourn his loss”. ...

 

Source:  Auckland Star Thursday 24 October 1929, p. 10.

 

A banking pioneer

 

One of the most prominent men in Auckland of his time, John Henry Upton, a trustee of the [ASB] bank from 1883 through 1929, was vice-president in 1895 and 1896.  Upton was born in Lincolnshire in 1845, came to New Zealand at the age of twenty-one and went into a bookselling and stationery business with his brother.  In his sixty years here, he was mayor for two terms, and a member of the Auckland Education Board, the Grammar School Board of Governors, the Diocesan Synod, the General Synod, the Melanesian Mission Trust and the St John’s College Trust, and was chairman for a period of most of those organisations.  He was a director of the South British Insurance Company, the Auckland Gas Company, the Bank of New Zealand, the Northern Steamship Company, Northern Roller Mills and New Zealand Newspapers Ltd.  He was president of the Auckland Chamber of Commerce in 1902.  The family business, Auckland and Company, was sold to Whitcombe and Tombs in 1916.

 

Upton was not untypical of the type of person who controlled the ASB -- shrewd, experienced and with a strong civic sense of obligation to the welfare of deposit-holders.

 

Source:  McLauchlan, Gordon.  The ASB: a bank and its community.  Auckland, Four Star Books, 1991, p. 57.

 

            Obituaries of wife Eleanor Gorrie (1848-1929)

 

An old and much-respected resident of Auckland, Mrs. J. H. Upton, died at her home, St. Stephen’s Avenue, Parnell, this morning.  Her health had been failing since the death of her husband in May this year.  Mrs. Upton was a sister of the late Mr. W. Gorrie, a former partner of her husband.  She was married in 1870 to Mr. Upton, and lived a great part of her life in Ponsonby.  Mr. and Mrs. Upton joined All Saints’ Church, Ponsonby, in the days when the Rev. W. Bree was vicar.  It was then a centre of the social life of that district, and both Mr. and Mrs. Upton were active workers in connection with that Church for many years.  Mrs. Upton was well known in musical circles in this city, and in her earlier years she possessed a very fine voice.  During the period that Mr. Upton was Mayor of Auckland, his wife was unremitting in her attention to the many activities attendant upon the position of Mayoress.

The following children survive:  Mrs. J. M. Stevenson, Miss Upton, Mr. P. H. Upton, general manager of the South British Insurance Co., Mr. Parker T. Upton and Mr. William Upton.

 

Source:  Auckland Star Monday 14 October 1929, p. 8.

 

The death occurred yesterday at her residence in St. Stephen’s Avenue, Parnell, of Mrs. J. H. Upton, aged 81.  Mrs. Upton had been in failing health since the death of her husband last May.

Mrs. Upton was a daughter of the Rev. John Gorrie, and her brother, the late Mr. W. Gorrie, was a former partner of her husband.  She married Mr. Upton in 1871, and they lived for many years in Ponsonby.  Both she and her husband were prominent church workers, and they were particularly interested in All Saints' Church, Ponsonby, to which they belonged in the days when the Rev. W. Bree was vicar.

Mrs. Upton was possessed of a very fine voice, and in her earlier years was well known in musical circles in Auckland.  During the time that her husband was Mayor of Auckland, from 1889 to 1891, Mrs. Upton was actively engaged in the many duties attendant upon her position, and earned wide respect.  She is survived by three sons and two daughters.  They are Mr. W. B. Upton, Mr. Percy H. Upton, general manager of the South British Insurance Company, Mr. Parker T. Upton, Mrs. J. M. Stevenson and Miss E. M. Upton, all of Auckland.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 15 October 1929, p. 14.

 

            7 children:

 

                        (1)  WILLIAM BROWN UPTON

 

                        Also known as Bill.

Born 6 June 1871 at Auckland.

                        Unmarried.

Died 17 April 1934 at Auckland.

 

                        Obituaries

 

The death occurred yesterday of Mr. William Brown Upton, of St. Stephen’s Avenue, Parnell, at the age of 62 years.  Mr. Upton, who was the eldest son of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Upton, was widely known in athletic circles in Auckland, particularly for the interest which he displayed in club cricket and for the liberality with which he gave trophies to encourage young players.  Formerly for several years he was a keen supporter of the Ponsonby Cricket Club, and for the past 12 years had been a vice-president of the Parnell Cricket Club, of which he was also a life member.  He was well known on the field, rarely missing the opportunity of witnessing a match.

 

Mr. Upton’s connection with the Auckland Grammar School Old Boys’ Association was a close and active one.  Himself an old boy of the school, he was a life member of the association, and held office in several of the affiliated bodies, being a vice-president of the Miniature Rifle Club and of the Swimming Club.  He also gave a number of swimming trophies, and took a practical interest in the Boy Scout and Cub movements.  For a period he was actively interested in the cub pack attached to St. Mary’s Cathedral, of which he was a parishioner for many years.  Born in Auckland, he lived in the district practically all his life, and never took an active part in business affairs.

 

Mr. Upton, who was a bachelor, is survived by two brothers, Mr. P. H. Upton and Mr. P. T. Upton, and two sisters, Mrs. J. M. Stevenson and Miss E. M. Upton, all of Auckland.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 18 April 1934.

 

An Auckland resident who was widely known in athletic circles, Mr. William Brown Upton, of St. Stephen’s Avenue, Parnell, died on April 17, aged 62.  He was the eldest son of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Upton, and is survived by two brothers, Mr. P. H. Upton and Mr. P. T. Upton, also two sisters, Mrs. J. M. Stevenson and Miss E. M. Upton.  Born in Auckland, Mr. W. B. Upton was a life member of the Auckland Grammar Old Boys’ Association, vice-president of the Miniature Rifle Club and of the Swimming Club, and took a practical interest in the boy scout movement.  He was keenly interested in club cricket, being for a time a supporter of the Ponsonby Cricket Club, and for the past 12 years was a vice-president of the Parnell Cricket Club, of which he was a life member.  He was the donor of various trophies to encourage young cricketers.  He also gave a number of trophies for swimming.  Mr. Upton never married.

 

Source: Auckland Star Thursday 19 April 1934, p. 9.

 

                        Residence in New Zealand

 

                        1896:  Waimai, Ngaruawahia (settler)

1900, 1905/06:  Waimai, Ngaruawahia (farmer)

1908, 1911:  49 Shelly Beach Road, St Mary’s Bay, Auckland (settler)

1914, 1919, 1922:  5 St Stephens Avenue, Parnell, Auckland (retired)

1925, 1928, 1931:  5 St Stephens Avenue, Parnell, Auckland (gardener)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

1898-99, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1907:  Waimai, Ngaruawahia (farmer)

 

Source:  New Zealand City and Area Diurectories, 1866-1954.

 

 

                        (2)  MARY MORTON UPTON

 

                        Born 5 October1872 at Auckland.

 

Married on 6 June 1901 at All Saints Church, Auckland JAMES MELVILLE STEVENSON, born 16 October 1866 at Auckland, son of James Young Stevenson (1836-1878) and Margaret Clark (1841-1910);  died 11 August 1937 at Auckland.

 

3 children:  John Melville Stevenson (1902-1966), Robert Selwyn Stevenson (1906-1984), Eleanor Mary Stevenson (1909-1993).

 

Died 9 December 1943 at Auckland.

 

                        Residence in New Zealand

 

1893:  Shelly Beach Road, St Mary’s Bay, Auckland (home duties)                       1896, 1900:  Ponsonby Road, Ponsonby (domestic / home duties)

1905/06, 1908, 1911, 1914:  Waimai, Ngaruawahia (domestic duties)

1919, 1922:  12 MacMurray Road, Remuera, Auckland (married)

1925, 1928, 1931:  4 Bassett Road, Remuera, Auckland (married)

1935:  16 Bassett Road, Remuera, Auckland (married)

1938, 1941:  16 Bassett Road, Remuera, Auckland (widow)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

 

(3)  PERCY HENRY UPTON

 

Born 21 April 1874 at Auckland.

Insurance manager.

 

Married on 28 January 1908 at Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Auckland FLORENCE SARAH NIHILL PIERCE, born 31 March 1878 at Auckland, daughter of George Patrick Pierce (1825-1891) and Eleanor Connell (1845-1912);  died 18 September 1954 at Stanley Bay, Auckland.

 

Died 29 June 1960 at Milford, Auckland.

Cremated 2 July 1960 at Purewa Cemetery, Meadowbank, Auckland.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

1914, 1919, 1922:  Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland (insurance manager)

1925, 1928, 1931, 1935, 1938:  67 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland (insurance manager)

1941, 1943, 1946, 1949, 1954:  247 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland (manager)

1957:  247 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland;  31 Kitchener Road, Takapuna, Auckland (retired)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

1913:  Market Road, Remuera, Auckland  (insurance assessor)

1916:  Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland (general manager, South British Insurance Co)

1920:  67 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland (South British Insurance Co)

1923:  67 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland;  Minnehaha Avenue, Takapuna, Auckland (manager, South British Insurance Co)

1926, 1930:  67 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland (manager, South British Insurance Co)

1933:  67 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland;  Minnehaha Avenue, Takapuna, Auckland (manager)

1936:  67 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland;  12 Minnehaha Avenue, Takapuna, Auckland (manager) 

1938:  67 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland;  14 Minnehaha Avenue, Takapuna, Auckland

1940, 1942, 1946, 1947, 1950-51, 1954:  247 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland

 

Source:  New Zealand City and Area Directories, 1866-1954.

 

Appointment

 

The board of directors of the South British Insurance Company has appointed Mr. Percy H. Upton as general manager of the company, that gentleman having for the last three years filled the important position of inspector and visited most of the foreign branches.  Mr. Upton joined the South British Company in 1892, and went to India in 1896, subsequently becoming local manager at Singapore.  He returned to Australia in 1901 as manager of the South Australian branch, and was afterwards transferred to Melbourne.

 

Source:  Evening Post 4 December 1914, p. 6 col. I.

 

The directors of the South British Insurance Company have appointed Mr. Percy H. Upton as general manager.  Mr. Upton joined the company in 1892, being stationed in Auckland.  After holding several positions in Australian and New Zealand branches, Mr. Upton went to India in 1896, subsequently becoming local manager in Singapore.  He returned to Australia in 1901 as manager of the South Australian branch, being afterwards transferred to Melbourne.  Three years ago he was appointed inspector of the company and in that capacity has visited most of the foreign branches.

 

Source: New Zealand Herald 2 December 1914, p. 9.

A small man in a big way

 

Everybody has heard of Henry Ford, Mr. Lang, Zane Grey and Gipsy Smith – they’ve all taken good care of that – but there are plenty of men in our own country, equally famous in their own particular line, who shun the searchlight of publicity as they would the plague, and remain shut up within the four walls of their offices, unheard of by the general public.

 

In the insurance world few names stand out more prominently than that of Percy H. Upton, who has spent practically a lifetime in the service of South British – that world-wide concern of which he is now general manager.

 

It is the small men, very often, who do the big things in life.  Percy Upton is proof of that.  His slight figure gives no indication to the casual observer of the energy which is the driving force behind South British, but his shrewd eyes and determined chin tell quite a different story.

 

As well as representing his firm in most parts of the Dominion, P. H. Upton has also furthered its interests in the East and in Australia, being manager both in South Australia and in Victoria some time ago.

 

Born in Auckland, where the name of Upton is very well known, P. H. Was educated at Auckland Grammar and now sits on the board of governors of his old school.  He is also chairman of the King’s College board.

 

Source:  New Zealand Truth 10 February 1927, p. 6 col. E.

 

South British Insurance Company Limited

 

Started                        1892

General Manager        1914-1934

Retired                        1934

Director                      1934-1938

Years of service          42

 

Guardian Trust & Executors Company of New Zealand Limited

 

General Manager        1915-1923

 

Source:  Vennell, C.W.  Risks and rewards: a policy of enterprise 1872-1972: a centennial history of the South British Insurance Company Limited.  Auckland, Wilson & Horton, 1972.  368 p.

 

Career

 

Percy Henry Upton joined the Auckland Branch of the South British Insurance Company in 1892, transferred to the Adelaide Branch in 1894, returned to New Zealand to the Napier Branch in 1895, then went to the Calcutta Branch in 1896 and the Singapore Branch in 1898.  He became Branch Manager in Adelaide in 1901 and the same position in Melbourne in 1909.  He returned to New Zealand as Inspector of Branches in 1911, and became General Manager from 1914 to 1934, when he retired.  On his retirement he was appointed a Director and served on the Board until 1938.

 

He was an Auckland champion swimmer during the 1880s, and a member of the winning South Australian rowing eight in 1905.  He was a member of the Auckland Grammar School Board, King’s College Board, Dilworth Trust Board and the Plunket Society.

 

Source:  Jaques, Anthony Patrick Pierce.  George Patrick Pierce and the Pierce Family in New Zealand.  (Unpublished manuscript MS 1735 held at the Auckland War Memorial Museum Library).

                       

Obituary

 

                        Top insurance man Mr P. H. Upton dies.

 

A former director and general manager of the South British Insurance Company, Mr Percy Henry Upton, has died aged 86.

 

Mr Upton was born in Auckland in 1874 and educated at Auckland Grammar School.  He joined the Auckland branch of the South British Insurance Company in January 1892.

 

In 1894 he was transferred to the company’s Adelaide branch, returning to New Zealand a year later.  He was then appointed to the branch in Napier.

 

His next move was to Calcutta in 1896.  Two years later he went to Singapore.

 

In 1901, at 27, he returned to Adelaide to become branch manager.  He remained there until 1909, when he took up a similar position in Melbourne.

 

He returned to New Zealand in 1911, when he was appointed inspector of branches.  He became general manager in 1914, a position he held until 1934.

 

On his retirement he was appointed to the board of directors and remained a director until 1938.

 

Mr Upton was a keen athlete and golfer in his younger days.  He was Auckland champion swimmer during the 1880s, and a member of a winning South Australian rowing eight in 1905.

 

He was a member of the Auckland Golf Club until 10 years ago, and belonged to the Auckland Racing Club and the Northern Club.

 

Mr Upton also was a member of the Auckland Grammar School Board, the King’s College Board, the Dilworth Trust Board, and the Plunket Society.

 

He is survived by three daughters.  His wife died five years ago, and his only son, Sub-Lieutenant J. P. Upton, died on active service in 1942.

 

Source:  Auckland Star 1 July 1960, p. 3;  New Zealand Herald  1 July 1960, p. 12.

 

4 children:

 

            (1)  ELEANOR FLORENCE UPTON

 

Born 13 March 1910 at Melbourne, died 26 November 1973 at Takapuna, Auckland.

 

Married on 3 November 1938 at Remuera, Auckland:

 

EDWARD TRACEY FLETCHER MILLETT (Ted), younger son of George Nicholls Millett (29 August 1880-5 February 1962) and Isabella Robertson Fletcher (11 January 1881-3 December 1965), born 28 January 1906 at Wanganui, insurance manager, died 17 December 1989 at Takapuna, Auckland.

 

South British Insurance Company Limited

 

Started                        1924

Retired                        1966

Years of service          42

 

Source:  Vennell, C.W.  Risks and rewards:  a policy of enterprise 1872-1972: a centennial history of the South British Insurance Company Limited.  Auckland, Wilson & Horton, 1972.  368 p.

 

War Service

 

Good Job Done – Fairmile Launches Return from Pacific

 

After a tour of duty in the Pacific which lasted for nearly 18 months, 12 Fairmile motor-launches of the Royal New Zealand Navy returned recently to Auckland.

 

The tour of duty began on February 6, 1944, when the first five Fairmiles left for the Solomon Islands.  The other seven departed on March 25, 1944.  Since then the flotilla has been engaged in patrols, escort, and anti-submarine work and has provided screens for vessels engaged in loading war materials at various places.

 

The officer in command of the base, H.M.N.Z.S. Kahu, from which the Fairmiles worked, was Lieutenant-Commander H. E. Cave, R.N., Gisborne. Senior officer of the flotilla was Lieutenant-Commander H. J. Bull, D.S.C., R.N.Z.N.V.R., Auckland, and the commanders of the 12 ships at the close of the tour of duty were Lieutenants ... E.T.F. Millett, Auckland, D. C. Algie, Auckland ...

 

Each of the Fairmiles carried two officers, two petty officers, and 12 ratings.  At the base in the Solomons there were 10 officers and 53 ratings.

 

On his return to the Dominion Lieutenant-Commander Cave was enthusiastic in his praise of the work of the officers and men under his command.  He expressed gratitude for the co-operation and assistance received from the United States navy.  He said that since the Fairmiles had left New Zealand they had travelled a total distance of 380,000 miles.  Though their work in the main had been monotonous, with no action by or against the enemy, it had been important, and the American naval authorities had been very appreciative of the manner in which it had been carried out.

 

“The Fairmiles stood up to the work very well, and I must congratulate the New Zealand builders of these little ships on their excellent workmanship”, said Lieutenant-Commander Cave.  He added that it was not at all the work for which the ships had been designed.  They had been intended for short coastal patrols, but during the Pacific tour had taken part in convoys over hundreds of miles.

 

Ratings in one of the Fairmiles expressed gladness at being back in the Dominion after the tour of duty, which had been partly interesting and partly monotonous.  They said food and conditions on the small ships had been very good, but they were pleased to taste fresh milk again.  Asked if they had any complaints, they gave a unanimous “No”.

 

Source:  Evening Post 30 July 1945, p. 7 col. F.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

1931, 1935:  67 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland (spinster)

1941, 1943, 1946, 1949:  14 Minnehaha Avenue, Takapuna, Auckland (married)

1954, 1957, 1960, 1963, 1966:  24 Minnehaha Avenue, Takapuna, Auckland (married)

1969, 1972:  10 O’Neills Avenue, Takapuna, Auckland (married)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Riolls, 1853-1981

 

Children:

 

EDWARD JOHN UPTON MILLETT (John), born 5 March 1940 at Takapuna, Auckland.  Farmer.

 

ANTONY PERCY UPTON MILLETT (Tony), born 1 May 1942 at Takapuna, Auckland.  Librarian.

 

RICHARD TRACEY MILLETT, born 16 April 1946 at Takapuna, Auckland, died 28 April 2010 at Waiheke Island, Auckland.  Sales executive.  Married on 3 May 1969 at Devonport, Auckland CREINA MARY DENTITH, born 12 December 1948 at Narrow Neck, Auckland, daughter of James Dentith (1901-1984) and Norah Alice Clarke (1905-1990).  2 children: Christopher Tracey Millett (born 15 September 1971), Jennifer Mary Millett (born 29 August 1974).

 

 

(2)  MARGARET ISOBEL UPTON

 

Born 14 September 1911 at Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.

 

Married in 1948 in Auckland  KENNETH SYDNEY TURTILL, born 20 February 1914 at Prescot, Lancashire, son of Hubert Sydney Turtill (1880-1918) and Mabel Edith Hancock (1884-1946), school liaison officer, died 8 July 2000 at Auckland.

 

Died 9 September 1990 at Takapuna, Auckland.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

1935, 1938:  67 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland (spinster)

1941, 1943, 1946, 1949:  247 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland (spinster)

1954, 1957, 1960:  132 Hurstmere Road, Takapuna, Auckland (married)

1963, 1966, 1969, 1972, 1975, 1978, 1981:  258 Hurstmere Road, Takapuna, Auckland (married)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

Children:

 

PAUL HANCOCK TURTILL, born 10 October 1950 at Takapuna, Auckland, died 13 August 1971 at Te Kauwhata, Waikato.

 

IAN SEYMOUR TURTILL, born 4 December 1952 at Takapuna, Auckland, died 19 April 2014 at Auckland.  2 children:  Paul John Turtill (born 22 July 1974), Andrew Upton Turtill (born 25 May 1976).

 

 

(3)  JOHN PIERCE UPTON

 

Born 14 April 1913 at Remuera, Auckland.

Solicitor (Russell McVeagh, Auckland).

 

Married on 23 October 1940 at St Mark’s Church, Remuera, Auckland MARION HENDERSON FRATER, born 1921 at Auckland, daughter of James Henderson Frater (1884-1955) and Ella Sydney Florence Gill (1884-1959);  died 5 October 2006 at Auckland.  No children.

 

Died 16 February 1942 in Bangka Strait, off Sumatra, Indonesia.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

1935:  67 Remuera Road, Remuera, Auckland (clerk)

1938, 1941:  35 Bassett Road, Remuera, Auckland (clerk)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

War Service

 

Royal New Zealand Naval Volunteer Reserve, HMS Fanling.  Died (killed in action) in the Bankra Straits, Sumatra on 16 February 1942.  Lt Upton volunteered for naval service and left for Singapore in November 1940 to serve in Coastal Defence craft, and early in 1942 a motor vessel.  The motor vessel of which he was in charge was shipping evacuees at the time it was lost in Bangka Strait, Sumatra.

 

Source:  Auckland War Memorial Museum Cenotaph Database http://muse.aucklandmuseum.com/databases/cenotaph/locations.aspx

 

The patrol boat HMS Fanling, commanded by Lieutenant Upton and carrying a number of army staff officers, was intercepted by a Japanese cruiser in Bangka Strait.  She opened fire with her four-pounder gun but was quickly sunk.  Upton was killed in this action.

 

Source:  Waters, Sydney David.  The Royal New Zealand Navy.  Wellington, Historical Publications Branch, 1956.  (The Official History of New Zealand in the Second World War, 1939-1945).  Chapter 29:  New Zealanders in the Royal Navy, p. 474-475.

 

The following letter was sent to John Pierce Upton’s wife, Mrs M. H. Upton, 52 Bassett Road, Remuera, Auckland by W. J. G. Prophit, Naval Secretary, Naval Office, Wellington on 25 March 1946:

 

Death of Lieutenant Upton

 

In command of ex Customs launch “FANLING” left Singapore with a party under Brigadier Aird-Smith, comprising 6 other officers and a few British N.C.O.s and Indian other ranks (all being ex-members of Lt. Gen. Heath’s staff) who had been instructed to get away from Singapore if possible.

 

Left night of Feb. 15th 1942.  At 6.30 a.m. on 16th found they had steamed into a Jap. Fleet of 1 cruiser, 2 destroyers and other smaller craft.  Upton decided to go straight on in the hopes that his boat would not be noticed.  Japs fired shot across their bows whereupon Upton stopped and brought his solitary gun, a 4-pounder, into action.  “FANLING” was sunk by H. E. and incendiaries about 15 miles from land.

 

These facts are taken from a letter dated July 14th 1942, to Lt. Gen. Heath from Lt. Col. R. H. Long, who made Banka Island just before dawn on Feb. 18th after being nearly 48 hours in the water, swimming with a lifebelt.  He is believed to be the only survivor.

 

The enemy made no attempt to pick up any who survived the shelling.  Upton’s very gallant action in going down fighting against impossible odds deserves to be placed on record.

 

(sgd) Sir Shenton Thomas

            Governor of Straits Settlements and

            High Commissioner Malay States

                                                                      4. 9. 43

 

Source:  National Archives of New Zealand Auckland Office:  BBAE series 1570 box 715 record 460/1946.

 

 

(4)  CECIL MARY UPTON

 

Born 25 August 1916 at Remuera, Auckland.

 

Married on 13 January 1942 at All Saints Church, Pimlico, London DONALD COLVIN ALGIE, born 27 January 1915 at Rotorua, son of Colvin Stewart Algie (1887-1916) and Alice Victoria Elizabeth Corlett (1887-1960);   accountant and company executive, died 16 May 1990 at Takapuna, Auckland.

 

Died 16 February 2002 at Takapuna, Auckland.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

1946:  11 Lake Road, Takapuna, Auckland (married)

1949, 1954, 1957, 1960, 1963:  224 Lake Road, Takapuna, Auckland (married)

1966, 1969, 1972, 1975, 1978, 1981:  253 Hurstmere Road, Takapuna, Auckland (married)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

University Degree

 

The degree of B.A. was conferred upon Miss Cecil Upton at a recent Congregation at Oxford University.  Miss Upton, who is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Percy Upton, of Remuera, has been a student at St. Hugh's College since October, 1937, and was successful in the Final Honours School of Modern History last July.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 16 January 1941, p. 12.

 

Wedding

 

Advice has been received of the wedding of Miss Cecil Mary Upton, youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs Percy Upton, of Remuera road (Auckland), and Sub-Lieutenant Donald Algie.  The bride, who has been in England since 1937, took her B.A. degree at Oxford University, and shortly after war broke out she joined the clerical staff of the B.B.C., where she has been employed ever since.  Sub-Lieutenant Algie, who lived in Auckland for some years, and was a member of the R.N.Z.N.V.R., has served in H.M.S. Chitral and H.M.S. King Alfred since leaving New Zealand in May of last year.

 

Source:  Christchurch Press 16 February 1942

 

Children:

 

ELIZABETH MARGARET ALGIE, born 10 July 1943 at Auckland, married on 17 December 1965 at St Peter’s Church, Takapuna, Auckland THOMAS FRANK BAYLISS, born 14 November 1936 at Gisborne.  3 children:  Rosemary Jane Bayliss (born 18 April 1971), Ian William Bayliss (born 8 June 1973), Andrew James Bayliss (born 12 August 1975).

 

MARY FLORENCE ALGIE, born 2 April 1946 at Takapuna, Auckland, married on 25 November 1967 at St Paul’s-by-the-Sea, Milford ADRIAN CASSAIDY, born 3 May 1944 at Preston, Lancashire.  3 children:  David John Cassaidy (born 15 June 1968), Anne Elizabeth Cassaidy (born 19 August 1970), Sarah Margaret Cassaidy (born 25 July 1975).

 

JOHN ALEXANDER ALGIE, born 20 October 1947 at Narrow Neck, Auckland, married in 1969 ELIZABETH ANNE PHILLIPS.  2 children:  Penelope Sarah Algie (born 12 July 1973), Emma Jane Algie (born 24 January 1976).

 

MATTHEW COLVIN ALGIE, born 12 August 1950 at Narrow Neck, Auckland, married (1) in 1971 MARGARET DONALDSON.  3 children:  Melinda Anne Algie (1971-1972), Kellie Alice Algie (born 27 April 1976), Keryn Algie (born 1978).  Married (2) WENDY THOW.

 

 

                        (4)  ALBERT UPTON

 

                        Born 7 July 1875 at Auckland.

Farmer.

 

Married on 22 February 1905 at Ngaruawahia, Waikato ETHEL LYDIA WILSON, born 14 January 1881 at Raglan, daughter of Thomas Wilson (1848-1934) and Mary Ann Cogswell (1854-1931);  died 12 August 1964 at Hamilton, Waikato.

 

4 children:  Harold Wilson Upton (1906-1997), John William Selwyn Upton (1908-1996), Ethel Charlotte Upton (1910-1993), Thomas Wilson Upton (1920-2008).

 

Died 8 October 1921 at Waimai, Waikato.

 

                        Residence in New Zealand

 

1896, 1900, 1905/06, 1908, 1911, 1914, 1919:  Waimai, Waikato (settler)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

1897:  Pepepe, Ngaruawahia (farmer)

1898-99, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1907, 1910, 1913, 1916, 1920:  Waimai, Ngaruawahia (farmer)

 

Source:  New Zealand City and Area Directories, 1866-1954.

 

Motor Accident

 

Mr Albert Upton, a well-known farmer of the Waimai district, was killed near Glenmassey last night in a motor accident.

 

Mr Upton was returning home to Waingaro from a visit to Auckland, driving a car in which were also seated Messrs John Darrow, Harry Hegh, and Frank Bogue.  Turning a dangerous bend near Glenmassey, on a road made treacherous by heavy rain, the car lights suddenly failed.  The wheels skidded, and the car missed the turn and went over a bank on to a rocky bottom some forty feet below.  Mr Upton was killed instantly, but the other members of the party escaped with cuts and bruises. ...

 

The deceased gentleman, who was educated at the Auckland Grammar School, settled with a number of Aucklanders at Waingaro over twenty years ago, when a new area of land was thrown open for settlement, and had farmed successfully ever since.  He was a son of Mr J. H. Upton, of Auckland, a director of the Bank of New Zealand.  He was about 48 years of age, and widely known and respected.  He is survived by a widow and four children.

 

Source:  Auckland Star Monday 10 October 1821, p. 7.

 

An inquest into the circumstances connected with the death of Mr. Albert Upton, who was killed in a motor-car accident near Glenmmassey, was held yesterday, a verdict of accidental death being returned.  The evidence adduced showed that the party left Ngaruawahia at 6 p.m. on Saturday in a steady downpour of rain.  The slope known as Mile Bush was negotiated safely, but on the brow of the hill, when deceased changed gears, the lights became very dim, and the car ran into loose earth in the darkness, skidded, and rolled over sideways about 30 feet.  The three other occupants of the car escaped with severe bruises.  The medical evidence showed that the deceased was killed instantly.  Reference was made to the fact that the Glenmassey miners rendered every assistance possible.

 

Source:  Auckland Star Tuesday 11 October 1921, p. 5.

 

 

                        (5)  PARKER TASKER UPTON

 

                        Born 9 February 1877 at Auckland.              

Merchant.

 

Married on 25 January 1910 at All Saints’ Church, Auckland MARGARET JOSEPHINE MOLLOY, born 28 April 1885 at Te Kopuru, Northland, daughter of Joseph Molloy (1860-1930) and Mary Murray (1862-1932);  died 10 March 1953 at Devonport, Auckland.

 

5 children:  Henry Tasker Upton (1910-2000), Mary Josephine Tasker Upton (1911-1994), Elizabeth Tasker Upton (1915-2001), James Tasker Upton (1917-1943), Margaret Susan Tasker Upton (1922-1984).

 

Died 26 July 1955 at Auckland.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

1900, 1905/06, 1908:  Shelly Beach Road, St Mary’s Bay, Auckland (stationer)

1911, 1914, 1919, 1922:  Victoria Avenue, Remuera, Auckland (bookseller & stationer)

1925, 1928, 1931:  18 Orakei Road, Remuera, Auckland (merchant)

1935, 1938:  40 Orakei Road, Remuera, Auckland (merchant)

1941, 1943:  25 Burwood Crescent, Remuera, Auckland (merchant)

1946:  36 Jubilee Avenue, Devonport, Auckland (merchant)

1949:  22 Tahora Avenue, Remuera, Auckland;  9 Stanley Point Road, Stanley Point, Auckland (retired)

1954:  9 Stanley Point Road, Stanley Point, Auckland (retired)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

1913, 1916:  Victoria Avenue, Remuera, Auckland (bookseller & stationer)

1920, 1923, 1926:  32 Victoria Avenue, Remuera, Auckland (Friar & Richards)

1926:  18 Orakei Road, Remuera, Auckland

1930:  40 Orakei Road, Remuera, Auckland

1942:  25 Burwood Crescent, Remuera, Auckland (merchant)

1946, 1947:  36 Jubilee Avenue, Devonport, Auckland (merchant)

1950-51:  22 Tahora Avenue, Remuera, Auckland

1954:  9 Stanley Point Road, Stanley Point, Auckland (merchant)

 

Source:  New Zealand City and Area Directories, 1866-1954.

 

Obituary

 

Mr Parker Tasker Upton, a member of an old Auckland family, has died in hospital, aged 78.

 

Born at Auckland in 1877, Mr Upton was educated at Auckland Grammar School, and worked for several years as manager of an Auckland stationery firm.  He later became a partner and then owner of an engineering hardware company.  He retired to his home at Stanley Bay in 1947.

 

Mr Upton was a member of the Auckland Gold Club and the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron for many years.  He is survived by three daughters, one son and seven grand-children.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 10 August 1955.

 

 

(6)  SELWYN UPTON

 

Born 16 September 1878 at Auckland.

Company secretary.

 

Married on 20 April 1911 at Ponsonby, Auckland WINIFRED HARTLEY LEYS, born 15 May 1881 at Auckland, daughter of Thomson Wilson Leys (1850-1924) and Charlotte Oxley (1849-1912);   died 20 July 1958 at Auckland.

 

3 children:  Geoffrey Thomson Upton (1912-1989), Winifred Joan Upton (1915-1997), Frances Ruth Upton (1918-2005).

 

Died 24 October 1922 at Auckland.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

1900, 1905/06, 1908:  Shelly Beach Road, St Mary’s Bay, Auckland (compositor)

1911, 1914:  Argyle Street, Herne Bay, Auckland (compositor)

1919, 1922:  25 Victoria Avenue, Remuera, Auckland (company manager)

 

Source:  New Zealand Elecrtoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

1913, 1916:  Argyle Street, Ponsonby (stationer)

1920, 1923:  25 Victoria Avenue, Remuera, Auckland (Brett Printing Co)

 

Source:  New Zealand City and Area Directories, 1866-1954.

 

Accident

 

On Wednesday evening Selwyn Upton, a son of Mr J. H. Upton, of Shelly Beach Road, met with a rather painful accident.  It appears that he was riding along Ponsonby Road on his bicycle, when a dog suddenly rushed in front of his machine, the result being that the rider was thrown with considerable violence to the ground.  He fell on his head, and was rendered unconscious for a time.  The young man was taken home and medical assistance procured.  He is now progressing favourably.

 

Source: New Zealand Herald 1 October 1897, p. 5.

 

Obituaries

 

The announcement of the death of Mr. Selwyn Upton, secretary to the Auckland Gas Company, will cause feelings of regret among a wide circle of personal friends and members of the commercial community with whom the deceased came in contact.  Mr. Upton was the youngest son of Mr. J. H. Upton.  Upon the retirement of his father from the old-established business of bookseller and stationer, Queen Street, he took over the business in conjunction with his brother, but it was subsequently disposed of to Messrs. Whitcombe and Tombs, and Mr. Selwyn Upton became commercial manager of the Brett Printing and Publishing Company.  When Mr. W. Stewart resigned the position of secretary to the Gas Company, Mr. Upton received the appointment.

 

Born in Auckland forty-four years ago, Mr. Selwyn Upton was educated at the Auckland Grammar School.  He was always actively interested in athletic sport especially tennis, in which game at one time he was the Auckland provincial champion.  He also represented the province in Rugby football.  He was an ardent gardener, and as a grower of daffodils had few equals in New Zealand.  Personally quiet and unassuming, without aspirations for public office, his genial sympathetic nature made him a universal favourite with the young Aucklanders of his own generation.  His sympathies were warmly enlisted on behalf of the blind, and at the time of his death he was a trustee of the Institute for the Blind, Parnell.  Mr. Upton married a daughter of Dr T. W. Leys, and is survived by his wife and three children.  The internment took place at Purewa cemetery this afternoon.

 

Source: Auckland Star Tuesday 24 August 1922, p. 5.

 

The death, at an early hour yesterday morning, of Mr. Selwyn Upton, secretary to the Auckland Gas Company, will cause very sincere regret.  His passing, however, terminating as it did a severe illness extending over nine months, was not unexpected.  Mr. Upton, who was 44 years of age, was the fifth and youngest son of Mr. J. H. Upton.  He was educated at the Auckland Grammar School.  In conjunction with his brother, Mr. Parker T. Upton, he took over the business of bookseller and stationer in Queen Street upon the retirement of his father.  The business was subsequently acquired by Whitcombe and Tombs, Ltd., and Mr. Upton was appointed commercial manager of the Brett Printing and Publishing Company.  This position he held until about 18 months ago, when he became secretary to the Auckland Gas Company, in succession to Mr. W. F. Stewart.  Always keenly interested in athletic sport, Mr. Upton was at one time lawn tennis champion of the Auckland Province, and he also represented the province in Rugby football.  In the sphere of horticulture, he achieved notable success as a grower of daffodils.  Mr. Upton was a trustee of the Jubilee Institute for the Blind, Parnell.  His wife, who is a daughter of Dr. T. W. Leys, survives him, and there are three children.  The internment, which was of a private character, took place at Purewa cemetery yesterday afternoon, the Rev. John Wilkinson, vicar of St. Aidan’s Church, Remuera, conducting the service at the graveside.

 

Source: New Zealand Herald 25 October 1922, p. 8.

 

 

(7)  ELEANOR MARGARET UPTON (Nellie)

 

Born 15 August 1887 at Auckland.

 

Unmarried.

 

Died 9 October 1954 at Auckland.

 

Residence in New Zealand

 

1908, 1911:  49 Shelly Beach Road, St Mary’s Bay, Auckland (spinster)

1914, 1919, 1922, 1925, 1928, 1931:  5 St Stephens Avenue, Parnell, Auckland (spinster)

1935:  16 Bassett Road, Remuera, Auckland (spinster)

1938, 1941, 1943, 1949, 1954:  35 Bassett Road, Remuera, Auckland (spinster)

 

Source:  New Zealand Electoral Rolls, 1853-1981.

 

Obituary

 

Miss Eleanor Margaret Upton has died at her home in Bassett Road, Remuera.  The younger daughter of the late Mr and Mrs J. H. Upton, she was for many years interested in the work of the Auckland Institute and Museum, and gave it considerable financial support.

 

A life member of the Institute, Miss Upton helped often with spring native flower shows.  She obtained regularly for the museum the Curtis Botanical Magazine, a rare and prized publication.

 

Over the years Miss Upton was a generous giver to a large number of causes.  She was at one time president and captain of the Auckland Ladies’ Golf Club.

 

Source:  New Zealand Herald 11 October 1954.

 

 

(6)  FRANCES SUSAN UPTON

 

            Also known as Fanny.

Born 1847 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire.

            Died 30 September 1893 at Pinchbeck.

 

 

 

(7)  CHARLOTTE UPTON

 

            Also known as Lottie.

Born 1850 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire.

            Died 17 May 1934 at Parnell, Auckland.

           

            Charlotte Upton was the unmarried sibling of well-known Aucklanders William Brown Upton (1840-1870) and John Henry Upton (1845-1929), who founded the Booksellers and Stationers firm of Upton Brothers.

 

The value of Charlotte’s estate at the time of her death on 17 May 1934 was £13,532, according to the Auckland Star for Tuesday 29 August 1944 p. 6, or £16,382 according to the New Zealand Herald for Wednesday 30 August 1944 p. 7.

 

Will

 

Charlotte left a somewhat strange will, the terms of which included an annuity payment to five of her nieces and a nephew named in the will, who were the children of Charlotte’s younger sister Lizzie Upton (born 1861 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire who married Henry Stokes at Pinchbeck in 1888).  The surplus income once the annuities were paid out was then apportioned to her other nieces and nephews survived by her.  However, under the terms of the will her estate could not be distributed until 21 years after the death of the last direct descendant, which occurred on the death of Margaret Christine May Freeman (née Stokes) on 25 August 1991 – meaning that the estate could not be distributed until after 25 August 2012.

 

Newspapers carried the following items regarding Charlotte Upton’s will:

 

DISAPPEARANCE

 

Spinster’s nephew beneficiary under will.

 

The complete disappearance of a man, Henry Upton Stokes, entitled to an annuity of £100 a year under the will of an aunt was the subject of an application by the Guardian Trust (Mr. Wallace) in the Supreme Court to-day before Mr. Justice Callan.  The defendant was represented by Mr. Hamer, and counsel asked the Court to make an order directing certain inquiries to be made.

 

On May 17, 1934, Charlotte Upton, a spinster, living in Parnell, died, leaving an estate then valued at £13,532.  Her will provided that an annuity of £100 be paid to Henry Upton Stokes, of Oundale, Peterborough, county of Northampton.  It was learned, however that Stokes, a married man and the father of three children living in Yaxley, had left home in search of employment in 1931 and had not returned, although it was known that he was employed as a commercial traveller by the Hoover Company, Ltd.  In April, 1942, he ceased corresponding with his wife and since then had completely disappeared.

 

In Court to-day counsel pointed out that Stokes’ wife, according to an affidavit, did not seem to be greatly concerned over the disappearance of her husband, although, if it could be proved that he had died subsequent to the death of testatrix, she would have claim to the annuity, the accrued amount of which was now over £1300.

 

Source:  Auckland Star Tuesday 29 August 1944, p. 6.

 

            MISSING MAN

UNCLAIMED ANNUITY

 

Parnell woman’s estate

 

The disappearance some 12 years ago of an annuitant under the will of a Parnell woman was the subject of an application heard by Mr Justice Callan yesterday.  The testatrix was Miss Charlotte Upton, of Parnell, who died on May 17, 1934, leaving an estate, the present value of which is estimated at £16,382.  She bequeathed an annuity of £100 sterling to her nephew, Henry Upton Stokes, of Gundale, Northampton, and annuities to each of four nieces.

 

Appearing on behalf of the Guardian Trust and Executors Company of New Zealand, Ltd., as executors of the estate, Mr Wallace asked whether or not Stokes should be presumed to be dead, and if so, that his share of the estate should be dealt with accordingly.  He outlined fruitless inquiries that had been made by the executors for the missing man, who was married in 1919 and had three children.  He was farming in Huntingdonshire until in 1931 he became a traveller for the Hoover Company in Nottingham.  He corresponded with his wife and family for a time, but completely disappeared in 1932.  The annuities that had accrued to his credit now amounted to over £1300.

 

Mr Hamer, who appeared by order of the Court to represent the missing man, suggested other possible lines of inquiry that might be followed.

 

His Honour directed that further inquiries be made from the Hoover Company in Nottingham, from the police in England, from the authorities concerned with the registration of deaths and with registration for national service, that appropriate advertisements be inserted in London and provincial daily newspapers.  The relevant papers are to be served upon Mrs Stokes in England.

 

            Source:  New Zealand Herald Wednesday 30 August 1944, p. 7.

 

ADVERTISEMENT IN BRITISH NEWSPAPERS, NOVEMBER 1944

 

ESTATE OF CHARLOTTE UPTON. – Late of Auckland in New Zealand, deceased.

 

To HENRY UPTON STOKES formerly of Ashton near Oundle, Northamptonshire, and Yaxley, Huntingdon and later of the City of Nottingham, Commercial Traveller and to others claiming through him Take Notice that by Order of the Supreme Court of New Zealand enquiry is being made for the above-named Henry Upton Stokes as beneficiary under the will of the above-named Charlotte Upton, deceased.  The said Henry Upton Stokes or any person claiming through him is required to prove his claim in writing to the undersigned on or before the 1st day of March 1945 failing which he may be excluded from participation in the said estate.  Any person knowing the whereabouts of the said Henry Upton Stokes or whether he is dead or alive is requested to communicate with the undersigned immediately.  The said Henry Upton Stokes was born at Nassington Northamptonshire in 1893 and from 1919 to 1931 was farming at Ashton and at Yaxley and in 1931 was employed in Nottingham as a Commercial Traveller by the Hoover Company Limited.  In view of the danger of the loss of mails by enemy action the Court has directed that the said Henry Upton Stokes or any person claiming through him or having knowledge concerning him be advised to communicate with the undersigned by cable as well as by mail.

 

FRED KNIGHT,

Registrar of Supreme Court Auckland.

 

Source:  Andrews Newspaper Index Cards, 1790-1976 (via Ancestry.com).

 

AFTER MANY YEARS BENEFICIARY FOUND

 

Man living in England

 

Unexpected success in a search which had been made for some years for a beneficiary under an Auckland will was reported in the Supreme Court to-day.

 

Under the will of Miss Charlotte Upton, leaving an estate then valued at £13,500, provision was made for a legacy to Henry Upton Stokes.  The beneficiary could not be located at the time by the trustees, the New Zealand Guardian Trust, and last August it was reported to the Court that in May, 1943, a sum of £1228 had been set aside to provide an annuity to H. U. Stokes, but that the trustees had been unable to locate him.  The Court then directed that final efforts be made by advertisement in Australia and elsewhere to locate the beneficiary.

 

To-day a report was made to Mr. Justice Finlay by Mr. Wallace, for the Guardian Trust, that the beneficiary had been located at Gosperton, in Lincoln County, England.  Application was made by counsel, assented to by Mr. Hamer for Stokes, and Mr. White for other beneficiaries, to have Stokes declared the beneficiary referred to in the will, and his Honour agreed to make the declaration accordingly.

 

            Source:  Auckland Star Monday 8 October 1945, p. 3.

 

BENEFIT UNDER WILL

MISSING MAN TRACED

 

Widespread inquiries

 

The discovery of a beneficiary under a will who had been missing since 1932 was reported to Mr Justice Finlay in the Supreme Court yesterday.  The beneficiary was Henry Upton Stokes (Mr Hamer), who was made an annuitant under the will of his aunt, Miss Charlotte Upton, of Parnell, whose death occurred in May, 1934.

 

When the matter was before Mr Justice Callan in August of last year it was stated that the present value of the estate was over £16,000 and that over £1300 had then accrued to pay the £100 annuity to Stokes.  Mr Wallace, then appearing for the Guardian Trust and Executors Company of New Zealand, Ltd., as executors of the estate, told of the many fruitless inquiries that had been made for Stokes and asked whether or not he should be presumed to be dead.  He had married in 1919 and had three children, but had completely disappeared in 1932.

 

Mr Justice Callan then made an order for numerous advertisements to be published in English papers and other inquiries to be made.  It was thought here that Stokes had either been killed in an air raid or had left England.

 

Mr White appeared yesterday for four nieces who are beneficiaries.  Mr Wallace, again appearing for the executors, submitted proof that the police had located Henry Upton Stokes, nephew of the testatrix, at Gosberton, in Lincolnshire, England.  He asked for an order declaring him to be identical with the person named in the will.  He said substantial costs had been incurred in England and it was a question whether these should come out of the accumulated annuity or be borne by the whole estate.

 

His Honour said he would make an order as suggested and asked counsel to submit a minute to him on the question of costs.

 

            Source:  New Zealand Herald Tuesday 9 October 1945, p. 7.

 

 

(8)  PERCY UPTON

 

            Born 1855 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire.

            Died 1879 at Pinchbeck.

 

 

(9)  LIZZIE UPTON

 

            Born 1861 at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire.

           

Married in 1888 at Pinchbeck HENRY STOKES, born about 1850 at Colleyweston, Northamptonshire.

           

5 children:  Henry Upton Stokes (1893-1972), Nora Kathleen Stokes (1894-1979)

Alice Mary Stokes (born 1895), Eleanor Frances Stokes (born 1898), Margaret Christine  May Stokes (1905-1991).

 

 

 

 

 

Updated 4 August 2016

John Henry Upton, 1845-1929
John Henry Upton, 1845-1929

John Henry Upton, 1845-1929
John Henry Upton, 1845-1929

John Henry Upton, 1845-1929
John Henry Upton, 1845-1929

Upton & Co., 158-160 Queen Street, Auckland
Upton & Co., 158-160 Queen Street, Auckland, New Zealand

charlotte_upton_will_page_1.jpg
Will of Charlotte Upton (1850-1934), page 1

charlotte_upton_will_page_2.jpg
Will of Charlotte Upton (1850-1934), page 2

charlotte_upton_will_page_3.jpg
Will of Charlotte Upton (1850-1934), page 3

Percy Henry Upton, 1874-1960
Percy Henry Upton, 1874-1960

Florence Sarah Nihill Upton nee Pierce (1878-1954)
Florence Sarah Nihill Upton nee Pierce (1878-1954) and Children

Eleanor Florence Millett and Percy Henry Upton
Eleanor Florence Millett nee Upton and Percy Henry Upton

Eleanor Florence Millett nee Upton, 1910-1973
Eleanor Florence Millett nee Upton, 1910-1973

Eleanor Florence Millett nee Upton, 1910-1973
Eleanor Florence Millett nee Upton, 1910-1973

Edward Tracey Fletcher Millett, 1906-1989
Edward Tracey Fletcher Millett, 1906-1989

Edward Tracey Fletcher Millett, 1906-1989
Edward Tracey Fletcher Millett, 1906-1989

Edward John Millett, 1940-
Edward John Millett, 1940-

Antony Percy Upton Millett, 1942-
Antony Percy Upton Millett, 1942-

Richard Tracey Millett, 1946-2010
Richard Tracey Millett, 1946-2010

Creina Mary Millett nee Dentith, 1948-
Creina Mary Millett nee Dentith, 1948-

Percy Upton, Florence Upton with Margaret Upton
Percy Upton, Florence Upton with Margaret Isobel Upton

Margaret Isobel Upton and Kenneth Sydney Turtill
Margaret Isobel Turtill nee Upton and Kenneth Sydney Turtill

John Pierce Upton, 1913-1942
John Pierce Upton, 1913-1942

Cecil Mary Algie nee Upton, 1916-2002
Cecil Mary Algie nee Upton, 1916-2002

Cecil Mary Algie nee Upton and Donald Colvin Algie
Cecil Mary Algie nee Upton and Donald Colvin Algie

Elizabeth Margaret Bayliss & Thomas Frank Bayliss
Elizabeth Margaret Bayliss nee Algie and Thomas Frank Bayliss

Mary Florence Cassaidy nee Algie & Adrian Cassaidy
Mary Florence Cassaidy nee Algie and Adrian Cassaidy

Matthew Algie and Wendy Thow with Andrew Bayliss
Matthew Colvin Algie and Wendy Thow with Andrew James Bayliss

Geoffrey Thomson Upton, 1912-1989
Geoffrey Thomson Upton, 1912-1989